Round 1
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Round 1
PK(OVR)TEAMNAMEPOSSCHOOL
1(1)San FranciscoAlex SmithQBUtah
 There isn't a lot that separates Aaron Rodgers from Alex Smith. Rodgers has the better arm, but Smith has the bigger frame. What it ultimately came down to was that new 49ers coach Mike Nolan fell in love with Smith's intelligence, charisma and overall intangibles -- and who can blame him?
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2(2)MiamiRonnie BrownRBAuburn
 New head coach Nick Saban and his staff have addressed a number of needs via free agency, but running back still was the top need entering the draft, and Brown was the most deserving candidate. Brown is big, strong and fast enough to carry a heavy load, and he also possesses considerably better skills in the passing game -- blocker and receiver -- than those of Cedric Benson and Carnell Williams.
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3(3)ClevelandBraylon EdwardsWRMichigan
 Even though the Browns have greater needs at OT and QB, new general manager Phil Savage isn't going to stray from his draft philosophy of selecting the best available player, regardless of position. Edwards has an outstanding combination of size and speed, and he's a flat-out playmaker when the ball is up for grabs. His ability to stretch defenses could make up for a lot of other weaknesses.
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4(4)ChicagoCedric BensonRBTexas
 The Bears desperately need some playmakers on offense, and Benson is a better fit for new offensive coordinator Ron Turner's power running scheme than is Carnell Williams. Last year's offensive scheme emphasized versatility at the running back position, but with the focus now on power, Benson shapes up as a 25-30 carry-per-game workhorse.
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5(5)Tampa BayCarnell WilliamsRBAuburn
 Bucs coach Jon Gruden fell in love with Williams while coaching him at the Senior Bowl, and this is a definite need area. Williams still needs to improve as a blocker, but he's the shiftiest and most elusive of the big three RBs (Brown and Benson), and he has the hands to become a legitimate weapon as a receiver out of the backfield.
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6(6)TennesseeAdam JonesDBWest Virginia
 The Titans lost both starting corners to free-agency -- Andre Dyson and Samari Rolle -- and looked for a replacement with their first-round pick. Jones has the speed, toughness and confidence to develop into a shutdown cover corner in the NFL and he's also an explosive return man.
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7(7)Minnesota (from Oakland)Troy WilliamsonWRSouth Carolina
 This pick might come as a surprise with Mike Williams still on the board, but the Vikings are looking for a vertical threat, and Williamson gives them more deep speed than Williams. Williamson has the size, long arms, hands and explosive speed to quickly develop into a deep threat in the NFL.
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8(8)ArizonaAntrel RolleDBMiami (FL)
 With the top three running backs already off the board, the Cardinals were determined to draft the best available defensive player at pick No. 8. Cornerback was clearly their biggest defensive need, and Rolle has the instincts, toughness and athletic ability to quickly become a solid starter in the NFL.
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9(9)WashingtonCarlos RogersDBAuburn
 There was a lot of speculation as to what the Redskins might do here, including the possibility of trading the pick or drafting WR Mike Williams. Ultimately, though, they chose to stick with filling a need on defense. Rogers has good size and speed. Most important, he is a physical cover corner with the athletic ability and confidence to play both man-to-man and zone coverage in the NFL.
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10(10)DetroitMike WilliamsWRUSC
 When a player like Mike Williams falls to you at No. 10, you almost have to go off the board and take him, regardless of your other needs. Speculation had Detroit targeting defense here, possibly with LB Derrick Johnson, but Williams' availability changed that. Williams has star potential, and he joins an already stellar receiving corps with Roy Williams and Charles Rogers.
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11(11)DallasDeMarcus WareDETroy
 The Cowboys have filled a number of needs in free agency, and with two first-round picks had the opportunity to address a couple of more. Ware fills one. He is a hybrid DE/OLB with explosive speed and loads of pass-rushing potential. Ware's draft stock skyrocketed after an impressive showing at the combine.
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12(12)San Diego (from N.Y. Giants)Shawne MerrimanLBMaryland
 The Chargers had hoped to be able to land an offensive playmaker here, but when the Lions took Mike Williams, it pretty much sealed the deal for San Diego to address a defensive need instead. Merriman has the speed, athleticism and instincts to immediately upgrade the pass rush.
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13(13)New Orleans (from Houston)Jammal BrownOTOklahoma
 The Saints had a hunch the Panthers might be interested in Brown at pick No. 14, so they traded up with Houston to get him at No. 13. Brown needs to become more physical, but he has the size and feet to develop into a solid starter in the NFL. He also has enough experience at the highest collegiate level to possibly step right in as a starter in 2005.
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14(14)CarolinaThomas DavisDBGeorgia
 The Panthers have made their bones on defense under John Fox, and Davis gives them a hard hitter and a sure tackler, whether he lines up at safety, as he did in college, or at outside linebacker, where a lot of people project him in the NFL. Wherever he lines up, he'll be a physical presense and a playmaker.
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15(15)Kansas CityDerrick JohnsonLBTexas
 The Chiefs wanted Thomas Davis here and actually tried to trade out of this pick when the Panthers took Davis. But they instead ended Johnsons' free-fall. He had been rated the top defensive player on some draft boards, but he's a classic OLB in a 4-3 scheme, and most teams looking defense earlier in the round were looking for a 3-4 edge rusher.
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16(16)Houston (from New Orleans)Travis JohnsonDEFlorida State
 Scouts Inc. rated Johnson the best defensive tackle in this year's draft class. Houston is in need of a plugger in the middle of its 3-4 defensive line, and that's what Johnson provides. He's a one-gap penetrating DT with enough bulk and strength to hold the point of attack.
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17(17)CincinnatiDavid PollackLBGeorgia
 As head coach Marvin Lewis continues to rebuild his defense, he was looking for a pass-rusher to take some pressure off RDE Justin Smith. Pollack provides that and more. While he might lack ideal size and top-end speed, Pollack has the quickness, power and playmaking instincts to contribute immediately in the NFL.
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18(18)MinnesotaErasmus JamesDEWisconsin
 The Vikings have to be elated. They got a speed-burner at No. 7 and a pass-rushing upgrade here. James' less-than-impressive workout at the combine and his history of injuries might have caused him to slip a little bit, but he's still one of the best pass-rushing DE prospects in this class.
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19(19)St. LouisAlex BarronOTFlorida State
 Finding a replacement for ROT Kyle Turley was a huge priority for the Rams, and Barron is clearly the most naturally gifted offensive lineman in this draft. He might have gone higher if not for his inconsistent effort and poor technique. Nevertheless, he has the size, strength and feet to develop into a starting right or left tackle in the NFL.
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20(20)Dallas (from Buffalo)Marcus SpearsDELSU
 Coach Bill Parcells wants his team to get bigger and more physical on defense, and the team has needs at both defensive-line spots that Spears would help fill nicely. Spears is a hard worker, and his combination of size and athleticism make him a terrific fit in Dallas' 3-4 scheme.
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21(21)JacksonvilleMatt JonesWRArkansas
 In easily the most surprising pick of the first round, the Jaguars drafted a college quarterback who projects as a slot receiver or tight end. Jones has terrific size and blazing speed, but he lacks experience at receiver and essentially is a developmental prospect.
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22(22)BaltimoreMark ClaytonWROklahoma
 With Travis Taylor gone from Baltimore, the Ravens still need WR depth, and Clayton is a great value here. He lacks elite size but has everything else scouts look for in a first-round wide receiver prospect, including quickness, speed and reliable hands. He might be the most polished receiver prospect in this year's draft.
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23(23)Oakland (from Seattle)Fabian WashingtonDBNebraska
 The Raiders traded up twice to get to this spot, once with the Jets to get to 26, then with the Seahawks to get to 23. Oakland also just traded CB Phillip Buchanon to Houston, creating a need that the speedy (4.27 40-yard dash) Washington can fill nicely.
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24(24)Green BayAaron RodgersQBCalifornia
 Rodgers was talked about as a potential No. 1 overall selection, but some bad luck and some concerns about his throwing motion and ability to adjust to NFL offenses sent him sliding. Nevertheless, there are worse places to land than as Brett Favre's understudy.
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25(25)Washington (from Denver)Jason CampbellQBAuburn
 When the Redskins traded into the first round earlier in the week, many observers dismissed the notion they were targeting Campbell. But having landed CB Carlos Rogers at No. 9, Washington could afford to pick a QB who might take a couple of years to fully develop.
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26(26)Seattle (from N.Y. Jets through Oakland)Chris SpencerOCMississippi
 While something of a surprise, this pick actually makes a lot of sense for the Seahawks, as it addresses a need before it becomes critical and gives the team tremendous verstility on the offensive line. Spencer is athletic and versatile -- he can play center and both guard positions -- and has great size with room to get even bigger.
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27(27)AtlantaRoddy WhiteWRUAB
 White has decent size and explosive speed, which should provide QB Michael Vick with a terrific deep threat to stretch defenses and open things up underneath for Warrick Dunn and Alge Crumpler.
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28(28)San DiegoLuis CastilloDTNorthwestern
 Castillo became a household name when it was revealed he failed a drug test at February's combine. He later admitted taking androstenedione, classified by the NFL as a steroid, to help recover from an injury. Despite the positive test, Castillo's stock continued to rise. He has size and quickness and will fit in nicely alongside Shawn Merriman, the team's pick at No. 12.
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29(29)IndianapolisMarlin JacksonDBMichigan
 Jackson is a big, physical corner whose aggressiveness and tendency to bite on run fakes will be somewhat alleviated by Indianapolis' cover-2 scheme. The Colts need to get tougher on defense, and this pick will help them accomplish that.
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30(30)PittsburghHeath MillerTEVirginia
 The Steelers had been hoping Miller would last this long, and thanks in part to a lingering hernia injury that kept him from working out for NFL teams, Pittsburgh got its wish. Miller is a crisp route-runner who catches anything thrown in his area. He runs with good power and is surprisingly productive after the catch.
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31(31)PhiladelphiaMike PattersonDTUSC
 The defending NFC champions have plenty of picks in this draft and few glaring needs. Drafting Patterson gives them both depth and insurance against the durability of the aging Hollis Thomas and Paul Grasmanis. Patterson's anticipation and initial quickness make him a good fit in Philadelphia's one-gap scheme.
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32(32)New EnglandLogan MankinsOGFresno State
 The Patriots lost OG Joe Andruzzi to free agency, so drafting the versatile Mankins makes a lot of sense. He played tackle in college but could move to guard in the NFL. He plays with the kind of mean streak coach Bill Belichick loves and also has a solid work ethic.
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