Coaches not meeting expectations

Eric Mangini, Sean Payton and Jeff Fisher have done incredible coaching job this season, writes Gary Horton.

Updated: December 8, 2006, 2:40 PM ET
By Gary Horton | Scouts Inc.
As the regular season winds down, three coaches have performed remarkably under difficult circumstances. They deserve a lot of credit for getting their teams to play better on a weekly basis than their talent level indicates. Let's look at all three and discuss why they are having success.

Eric Mangini -- New York Jets
When he accepted the job after the 2005 season, the first thought that came to mind was that the New York media would devour Mangini. Even though his coaching pedigree was impressive, this job might be too big for him. Those observations have not held true. Everything Mangini does reminds you of his mentor, Bill Belichick, especially in the art of secrecy.

Like the Patriots, the Jets' players say virtually nothing to the outside world and have virtually no locker room turmoil surrounding them. His players really believe in Mangini's intelligence and feel he gives them a competitive edge.


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Gary Horton spent 10 years in the NFL as a scout and another 10 years at the college level as an assistant coach and recruiter. He is the founder and most seasoned member of the Scouts Inc. staff, and his extensive experience at all levels of football make him an excellent talent evaluator.