Commentary

Q&A on X's and O's for AFC

Training camp is a time of optimism. Every team has a shot at the Super Bowl, and every question has an answer. Here are the biggest questions and answers each AFC team has heading into training camp.

Updated: July 22, 2008, 10:09 AM ET
By Jeremy Green | Scouts Inc.
Training camp is a time of optimism. Every team has a shot at the Super Bowl, and every question has an answer. Here are the biggest questions and answers each AFC team has heading into training camp.

AFC East

Have the Buffalo Bills adapted to their new West Coast offense?
This system, installed by new offensive coordinator Turk Schonert, should be beneficial for QB Trent Edwards, who needs to get his completion percentage above the 60 percent mark. Yes, he finished at 56.1 percent last year, but was also guilty of having games in the 30 percent range. Edwards lacks big-time arm strength, but he is a cerebral quarterback who makes good and quick decisions. This is a system that really benefits the Bills' personnel, from Edwards to WR Lee Evans, who can make plays with the ball in his hands, to rookie WR James Hardy, who is a big target and can work the middle of the field, to RB Marshawn Lynch, who will see more seven-man fronts from three-receiver sets. Along with a maturing defense, the ability for Edwards to run this new system will go a long way toward determining the Bills' playoff hopes.

Who is going to play quarterback for the Miami Dolphins?
This has been the question in most every Miami training camp since Dan Marino retired. Of the three options, veteran QB Josh McCown gives the Dolphins the best chance to win now. He has starting experience in Arizona and Oakland, but is also mistake-prone and hardly the future of the organization. Playing McCown wouldn't be worth the extra win or two he could give Miami because it still does not translate to a playoff berth. That means it should come down to second-year QB John Beck and rookie Chad Henne. Beck was drafted in 2007 as the future quarterback of the franchise, but that was by the previous personnel and coaching staff. He'll be given every chance to prove himself, but so far, Henne has looked the best in minicamps and OTAs. But playing a rookie has risks because history says he could get hit often and lose confidence. Still, this is a question Miami must answer early in camp to silence any controversy and allow the team to rally behind the player at the most important position on the field.