Pressure mounts as clock ticks

A draft room can go from calm to chaotic in a hurry, especially when there's a trade proposal on the table, writes Floyd Reese.

Originally Published: April 26, 2007
By Floyd Reese | Scouts Inc.
The draft room has evolved over time. In the draft's early years, a team's owner, general manager and coaches would sit around a large table and make all the selections.

The modern-day draft room, which is usually found in each franchise's facility, is much more crowded. The basic players in the room include the head coach, scouts, director of college scouting, director of player personnel, general manager and occasionally the owner. All of these individuals will be involved in a weekend-long conference call with the team's representative in New York.

Every inch of the large draft room is used for information. On one wall you will find the pro board, which consists of invaluable information that can help the player personnel department act as prognosticators and predict upcoming picks. The college draft board, generally the largest board in the room, consists of a player's height and weight, 40-yard dash times and Wonderlic test scores. It also includes the area scout's grade, director's grade and team grade. In addition to the boards, it is beneficial to have salary-cap information on each team, trade tables or values that are assigned to each pick, and tapes on pro and college players.

Former Tennessee Titans general manager Floyd Reese contributes frequently to ESPN.com.