Round 2
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Quick's got excellent size, combined with very good athleticism and agility. He's a little raw at this point, but he's a big body that can get down the field, and he excels when the ball is in the air to win one-on-one matchups.

    How he fits: 

    The Rams did add Steve Smith from Philadelphia in free agency, but knee problems make him a real question mark. And all the rest of their receivers are just complementary players with very little explosiveness and no ability to stretch the field. Even though he's not complete at this stage, Quick's a big guy who will eventually learn to get deep and should help on third down and the red zone, which were both major problems for the Rams a year ago. He has a chance to either start or at least be in their nickel package and multi-receiver packages.

  • What he brings: 

    Fleener's clearly the best tight end prospect in this class. He's a big athletic target, with enough speed and body control to stretch the field. He needs to develop as a blocker, but he has the frame to get better in that area. The comfort level between him and Andrew Luck should make the transition easier for both of them.

    How he fits: 

    This has been a big, productive position for the Colts in the past, but this new coaching staff but basically cleaned it out and is starting from scratch. Obviously, Fleener and Luck have a great rapport with their Stanford background and on an offense that will struggle early with passing weapons, he could be very effective in motion sets, playing wide and looking for good matchups. He will likely be Luck's favorite go-to target -- along with Reggie Wayne -- as a rookie. New offensive coordinator Bruce Arians loves to use tight ends even in double sets.

  • What he brings: 

    Upshaw excels at setting the edge in the run game, and also comes off the ball with great leverage. Upshaw's a very stout and strong defender, and he has excellent finishing power as a pass rusher.

    How he fits: 

    He is the perfect fit for Baltimore's aggressive 3-4 aggressive defense. He should be excellent off the edge as a pass-rusher and run defender. He can even put his hand in the dirt in some sub packages. This linebacking corps is not as deep as it has been in the past and he has a chance to line up opposite Terrell Suggs and be a consistent sack producer. They're trying to get younger at this position.

  • What he brings: 

    Wolfe is a versatile player who can line up anywhere along the defensive line and plays through the whistle on every snap. He makes up for his lack of elite explosiveness with violent hands and above-average athletic ability.

    How he fits: 

    This was the No. 1 need for the Broncos as they try to get bigger and more physical on defense, especially inside. They're making the transition from 3-4 to 4-3 and injuries and losses in free agency has really robbed them of their depth. They need a big inside run stuffer and he will fill that bill but also give them some penetration and one-gap looks. It's a nice need pick for the Broncos.

  • What he brings: 

    Concerns about a back injury and his average pass-blocking skills hurt his draft stock. On the other hand, he has everything you're looking for in a starting right tackle. He's a four-year starter, he's smart, tough and strong.

    How he fits: 

    Schwartz is a big, physical guy who will likely step in immediately as a starter at right tackle to pair with Joe Thomas. He will be a better run blocker and pass protector, but in this new run-oriented West Coast offense, which will not only get the ball out quickly but will also hand off a lot to Trent Richardson, he should be fine and his weaknesses will not be exposed. He has a chance to develop with this new offense.

  • What he brings: 

    Branch is still developing in terms of instincts, but he's got a quick first step as a pass rusher, excellent use of hands and can bend the edge. In addition, he has enough athleticism to play in space if need be. He's strong against the run and plays with a great motor.

    How he fits: 

    This was a huge need for this Jaguars defense, one that actually felt it was just one edge rusher away from being a complete unit. Injuries and age leaves them with marginal depth and some question marks. Branch could either be a starter or be in a three-man rotation and he will really add to the inside pass rush in the 4-3 defense.

  • What he brings: 

    One of, if not the most talked about prospect in this class, Jenkins' off-the-field issues are well-documented at this point. The risk is clearly worth the reward for the Rams here, though. Jenkins is arguably the most pure cover-corner in this class.

    How he fits: 

    We know about his obvious skill set and his off-the-field problems, but if he plays like he should, he upgrades a tremendous weakness. This was a horrible unit in 2011 and a lot of it had to do with injuries, but it may have been the biggest patchwork group in the NFL. When they faced multi-receiver packages they had no chance. Free agent Cortland Finnegan is a huge upgrade and he can cover the opposition's best receiver. That means they need Jenkins to step in immediately at No. 2 as they're going to play a significant number of man-to-man schemes. If they can become a good turn-and-run duo, it can cover up a lot of this defense's weaknesses.

  • What he brings: 

    Silatolu is a mauler with the core strength to move defenders off the ball as a run blocker and has the potential to develop into an effective pass blocker. The two concerns with him are the level of competition he played against in college and his ability to hold up against quicker pass rushers, especially if he's asked to play tackle.

    How he fits: 

    This is a run-oriented offense that really needed an upgrade -- up front, especially on the right side because of injuries and free agency defections. If their tackles return healthy, which is a question mark, he can step in probably at right guard, which would be his best position. If he's forced to play outside at tackle because of injuries, he may struggle playing in space and stopping speed rushers.

  • What he brings: 

    Glenn is a four-year starter who struggled in pass protection early in the 2011 season, but really improved later on. He has the arm length, strength and enough mobility to be a Day 1 starter at right tackle.

    How he fits: 

    Offensive tackle has been a huge need for this offense, and the coaches have moved Chris Hairston from ROT to LOT and seem comfortable with it. That will allow Glenn to step in at ROT, or he could be in a three-man rotation with Hairston and Eric Pears. Look for the Bills to make one of the two guys they have the left tackle and slide Glenn in at right tackle.

  • What he brings: 

    Martin's light on his feet, and has good lateral quickness in pass protection. However, he's a guy who needs to get stronger in the core, especially in the run game, as well as anchoring against power moves, which may be a reason why he fell to the second round.

    How he fits: 

    His skill set probably fits more at LOT, but with Jake Long sitting there, he will likely have a great chance to start at ROT, which was a huge weakness. That's where Marc Colombo was a weak link a year ago. If Martin can handle ROT, it gives the Dolphins the flexibility of keeping their guards inside and not have to move a guy outside. It could give them six quality offensive lineman.

  • What he brings: 

    Hill has an excellent blend of size and top-end speed to stretch the field vertically. Hills is raw, though, coming from Georgia Tech's triple-option scheme, and will need time to develop his underneath route running. However, he does a good job tracking the ball in the air and has a knack for making the tough catches outside of his frame.

    How he fits: 

    He fills a significant need for an offense with a lot of complementary guys. The Jets have only one playmaker in Santonio Holmes and because of that Holmes gets a lot of attention and rolled coverages. Hill is enough of a deep threat to really open up some defenses and with the Jets' new effort to run the football, he could become an effective play-action receiver. His size should give them good third-down and red zone production. He should also be able to help move the chains.

  • What he brings: 

    Allen is a four-year starter who's an above-average pass blocker for an interior offensive lineman. He does a good job covering up defenders as a run blocker, as well. The only concern is he doesn't have that nasty disposition or overall power teams covet in offensive lineman.

    How he fits: 

    He was an offensive tackle in college, but will likely step inside in this offense. Although there are some interesting scenarios, the production inside for the Chiefs a year ago was inconsistent, which is a problem for an inside run game. There just aren't enough guys to develop. Interestingly, LOT Branden Albert is their best player and he could fit well inside, which could open up Allen to moving back outside where he played in college. There are some moving parts in this pick, but we know this an offense that wants to run first.

  • What he brings: 

    Jeffery's got outstanding size and one of the better sets of ball skills in this year's class. However, a lack of suddenness with his routes brings up concerns about his ability to create separation at the next level. He should bring an immediate impact in the red zone, though.

    How he fits: 

    This has not been a receiving corps that the Bears can count on in the past, though they made a major upgrade by trading for Brandon Marshall. There are injury problems with Johnny Knox, no one knows whether Devin Hester be an every-down player, the other guys are developing and there's virtually no threat at tight end. Jeffery's a big guy who should be able to help them initially in sub packages, maybe out of the slot. He should improve them in third-down situations, where they really struggled in the red zone, and he should be a big target for Jay Cutler. In a new run-oriented offense, he may get some nice matchups.

  • What he brings: 

    Kendricks makes up for his lack of ideal take-on skills with instincts and quickness. So he beats blockers to the point instead of stacking and shredding. His real value is on third down, though. He can both rush the passer and make plays in coverage.

    How he fits: 

    The linebacker corps for the Eagles was their worst unit a year ago and it wasn't until late in the season that they finally started to jell in their Wide Nine scheme. They gave up a lot of big yards early. They have four young guys outside that have developmental qualities, but are not complete yet. The real question noware they just backups and special teams guys? DeMeco Ryans is an excellent free-agent pickup from Houston at MLB and he will solidify the front seven. But their need is probably for an OLB that could start and make plays or an ILB who could back up Ryans. Kendricks has experience in both positions, He gives them another interesting young guy to develop. They'll eventually get this position right.

  • What he brings: 

    Wagner's an instinctive run defender with above-average range and tackling ability. While he might not have great man-to-man cover skills, he shows good range and zone. He's also a relentless pass rusher.

    How he fits: 

    Pete Carroll made it a priority to upgrade the overall speed and explosive plays for their linebacking group, which seemed to be missing last season. Outside starters Leroy Hill and K.J. Wright are adequate and MLB Barrett Rudd is solid, but they need a difference maker to develop quickly to push the starters and Wagner probably fits best outside. But will he become a three-down player?

  • What he brings: 

    Wilson has versatility at both safety and corner. He's a fluid athlete with good top-end speed. However, he must get stronger and improve his overall instincts in coverage.

    How he fits: 

    He is another great example of a player with tremendous versatility, which Bill Belichick loves. He can play corner or safety, man-to-man or zone, and those positions are big needs for the Pats. If he plays inside, their best cover corner, Devin McCourty, can stay at corner full time. If he plays outside, McCourty can move inside full time. Remember, they got free safety Steve Gregory from San Diego, which upgrades their range. Belichick will mix and match and figure out their best skills, and Wilson should give them depth in their sub packages.

  • What he brings: 

    Reyes is the prototypical 3-4 defensive end. He has the long arms and core strength to set the edge against the run, in addition to enough explosiveness and lower-body power to collapse the pocket as a bull rusher. He's also versatile enough to kick inside a defensive tackle.

    How he fits: 

    He fits perfectly as a physical 3-4 DE in this defense that will not ask him to give them a lot of pass-rush production. Their ends got pushed around a lot and they fell off in the run game. He will have the chance to start at DE and be part of a three- to four-man rotation which should upgrade them on the edges against the run. Anything they get in the pass rush will be a bonus.

  • What he brings: 

    Pead's got a nice combination of lateral quickness and top-end speed. He runs with better balance than his size would indicate, and brings versatility in the passing game and as a returner on special teams.

    How he fits: 

    Steven Jackson is still a very productive back, but he doesn't have a lot of help. In an offense that will now really emphasize the run with Jeff Fisher and Brian Schottenheimer, Pead can be a complementary player who could help the Rams a little bit in the return game and have some production on third down in the short passing game for Sam Bradford. He could take a few snaps away from Jackson.

  • What he brings: 

    The concern with Worthy is you don't know what you're getting from snap to snap. At his best he's an explosive upfield disruptive player, against the run and the pass. The problem is he can get moved off the ball when he's not playing at his highest level, and there are also concerns about his endurance.

    How he fits: 

    Although the Packers don't expect a lot of pass-rush production from their defensive line, this is a position they needed to upgrade. They don't make a lot of plays, although nose tackle B.J. Raji can dominate. They could lose DE Mike Neal for the first four games with a suspension. Worthy looks like he can fit in on a DE rotation and the one thing he may give them is some inside penetrating skills as a one-gap pass rusher, which could be very effective if he's lined up next to OLBs Clay Matthews or first-round pick Nick Perry.

  • What he brings: 

    The knock on Brown is he doesn't have great instincts and he gets caught out of position a little too much. He's still a good value at this point because of his range. He's a sideline-to-sideline run defender, and he's capable of matching up in man coverage.

    How he fits: 

    This defense was at the bottom of the league in sacks last season. They made a major upgrade with Kamerion Wimbley from Oakland as a defensive end, and now Brown gives them speed and athleticism as an OLB. He can blitz off the edge and he can make plays in space. He gives them a chance to create turnovers and game-changing plays that they have not had enough of in this defense.

  • What he brings: 

    The reason Still didn't come off the board in the first round is inconsistent effort. In terms of natural ability, he has everything you're looking for in a defensive tackle. He's quick, he's proven his ability to get off his hands, and he's strong enough to anchor against the run.

    How he fits: 

    He'll play a DT in their base 4-3 defense and a DE when they throw in some 3-4 wrinkles. The Bengals like to use a deep DL rotation and they prefer to attack the QB without a lot of blitzes, although they will as necessary. The thing that makes Still unique is the fact that he has some good inside penetrating skills that can disrupt a quarterback. He's a little bit of a feast-or-famine guy; at his best his inside playmaking will upgrade this DL.

  • What he brings: 

    Broyles is quicker than fast working from the slot as a wide receiver. However, his best attributes are his hands and his toughness working the middle of the field. Assuming he recovers his full strength from his injury, Broyles could end up bringing great return at this point.

    How he fits: 

    At first, this doesn't look like a big need for the Lions as they have an interesting group of players. However, Broyles gives them a chance to upgrade at the slot receiver position. In this offense, they run a lot of short to intermediate routes that are fairly low-risk. Broyles is a guy who knows how to get open and work zones. If he can be that slot guy, he can really open up things outside for Calvin Johnson. He gives Matthew Stafford a consistent target.

  • What he brings: 

    Konz has to get stronger and show that he can stay healthy, but he's by far the best center prospect in this class. He's big and athletic, he does a good job of getting into position as a run blocker, and he rarely loses as a pass blocker.

    How he fits: 

    This is a good football player who really fills a need. Current OC Todd McClure is probably in his last year and while the Falcons have some serviceable guys, they don't have a guy ready to step in and take McClure's spot. Konz can play all three inside positions as a rookie and can take over at center a year from now, which is imperative in a run-oriented offense.

  • What he brings: 

    Adams is one of the most frustrating prospects to watch on film. He has the quick feet and length teams covet at left tackle, and he's also an effective run blocker who can cover up defenders. However, he's highly inconsistent and seems uninterested at times.

    How he fits: 

    He is a big, gifted athlete. The reason he dropped this far is well-documented. He probably best fits at LOT because of his feet, but the Steelers recently moved Marcus Gilbert from ROT to LOT. You would think they could move Gilbert back to ROT and insert Adams at LOT, and along with OC Maurkice Pouncey and new ROG David DeCastro, this offensive line that has struggled in pass protection and run blocking is all of a sudden starting to look like a much-improved unit. Big Ben should be the happiest guy in town.

  • What he brings: 

    Osweiler has exceptional size at nearly 6-foot-7, and has above-average athleticism considering his length. While he's a bit raw and needs to work on his mechanics, he flashes tremendous upside with a quick release, a strong arm and natural accuracy.

    How he fits: 

    The Broncos have hopefully learned that as great as Peyton Manning is, he needs a quality backup. He didn't have it in Indy, but Osweiler is that guy in Denver. He's a big with a tremendous skill set and he's playing behind Manning. He can take his time to play under center and run an NFL offense as opposed to the spread packages in college. Right now, Caleb Hanie is the backup and Osweiler will be No. 3 for this year, but look for him to be developed the way Aaron Rodgers was behind Brett Favre. This is a great spot for him.

  • What he brings: 

    David lacks elite size but he plays with great leverage, both as a tackler and taking on blocks. He brings great versatility on third down to hold up zone and man coverage, which should help considering the NFL's trend to pass-happy offenses.

    How he fits: 

    This is an adequate linebacker group without a lot of big explosive plays, especially on the outside. In fact, the Bucs have thought about moving MLB Mason Foster outside to give them more athleticism. But now, David can play outside and probably allow Foster to stay inside. His biggest contribution early will be in sub packages as a cover/space linebacker.

  • What he brings: 

    Curry's a better football player than he is athlete. He has a quick first step, comes off the ball with leverage and has strong and powerful hands. He plays with a great motor and will make an immediate upgrade as a pass rusher.

    How he fits: 

    The Eagles can never have enough pass-rushers. They believe need a deep defensive line rotation so they can bring waves of defenders at opposing QBs, with a lot of one-gap penetrating schemes out of the 4-3 front. How they play in the DL directly effects the linebackers behind them. Curry can give them another guy in this rotation with a little more power than the other guys. He's going to be a complementary player for a while.

  • What he brings: 

    Osemele is a mountain of a man who needs to improve his technique and play with more consistent effort. But he has the strength and size to be an immediate starter at guard. If he can improve his footwork he has the potential to be a starting right tackle.

    How he fits: 

    This offensive line is in a little bit of a transition phase at LOG, where the Ravens lost a good player in Ben Grubbs in free agency. They thought about moving one of their OTs inside to fill the hole, but Osemele takes away that need. He will be expected to step right in at LOG and become an immediate starter.

  • What he brings: 

    James is a change-of-pace back that's lightning-quick and has the ability to get to top-end speed instantly. He has great versatility as a receiver out of the backfield in the passing game, as well as a returner on special teams.

    How he fits: 

    Frank Gore is still the man in the 49ers' run game and UFA acquisition Brandon Jacobs brings them size and power. Even their third back, Kendall Hunter, has some production, so James is going to have to work hard to find some quality snaps. His explosiveness, big-play capability and potential receiving skills make him interesting. This coaching staff is excellent at moving weapons around to find good matchups. You can bet that the 49ers will find a role for James.

  • What he brings: 

    Hayward is a physical corner who's at his best re-routing receivers at the line of scrimmage. He's not a natural pass-catcher, but he makes a lot of plays in coverage because of his outstanding instincts. He's consistently in position to make a play on the ball, and there's a lot to like about the way he plays the run.

    How he fits: 

    With safety Nick Collins not coming back, Charles Woodson may move to safety full time and that may open a spot for Hayward. He's physical and makes a lot of plays, but he's not elite in turn-and-run situations. This secondary gave up a ton of passing yards a year ago, but it also led the NFL with 31 INTs. Maybe he'll bring some stability to the Packers secondary.

  • What he brings: 

    Randle played in a run-heavy scheme and likely suffered from inconsistent quarterback play. He needs to get better as a route runner, but he has the size, speed and athletic ability to challenge most corners one-on-one. He's strong enough to make plays underneath when he doesn't separate, and athletic enough to compete for jump balls down the field.

    How he fits: 

    He joins a wide receiver corps that already has pretty good players. He will have to work his way into three- and four-wide receiver sets. The Giants develop their WRs well and Eli Manning will really work with him. His size and ability to run the intermediate routes should give Manning a safe target.