Round 7
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • Catapano is one of our bigger sleepers on Day 3. He has a quick get-off as a pass-rusher, with active hands and the ability to bend the edge. Catapano also plays with leverage and can set the edge and maintain outside contain as a run-defender. We love his relentless motor and potential to develop into an impact edge rusher.
  • Harris has a rare blend of height and top-end speed, but he is lean and needs to add some bulk to his frame. While he gets his hands on a lot of passes, he's not a natural playmaker.
  • Butler has the size and enough top-end speed to factor in as a downfield vertical threat. He needs polish with his routes and will have an occasional focus drop, but we like his upside at this point.
  • McCray has above-average size and flashed at the NFLPA all-star game. He has good length and quick feet, but he has some tightness and lacks an extra gear needed to recover when caught out of position. McCray will step up in run support, and his best fit appears to be as a press corner. The Jaguars, who have had to rebuild their CB corps, have added one free agent and three players in this draft. That should give them a lot of flexibility.
  • Williams has prototypical size as a traditional 'Y' tight end. He lacks agility and burst, and is most effective as a short-to-intermediate target. We like his hands and focus in traffic. Williams also has upside as an inline blocker with his size and natural strength, but he can become a more consistent finisher.
  • Kruger has a prototypical frame with excellent length. He has good core strength, but needs to learn to play with more consistent pad level when setting the edge in the run. Kruger isn't an impact pass-rusher at this point, and must learn to stay low firing off the ball. We do like his effort, though, and he has potential to add depth up front.
  • Mauti has exceptional instincts and leadership skills. However, he has suffered three major knee injuries in the past four seasons, which has really hurt his fluidity in space. At this point, it will take a lot for him to stick in the league, and a lot will depend on his hard work in rehab and the ability to maintain his health moving forward. The Vikings did not draft an ILB, even though a lot of people projected Manti Te'o to go to Minnesota. They are obviously still looking for a guy they can count on, but Mauti has been devastated by knee injuries. His success will be directly dependent on his ability to stay healthy.
  • Bond has a big frame and rare length with 35.6-inch arms. He can play right tackle or guard, but he's a marginal athlete who slips off too many blocks and doesn't play with enough of an edge.
  • Bohanon is one of the most versatile fullbacks in this class. He can line up all over the field, including in the backfield, at tight end and flexed out wide. Bohanon is a grinder who does the dirty work necessary for the position. In addition, while he doesn't have a lot of quickness and speed as a receiver, he has a great feel for routes and is a natural pass-catcher who can adjust to throws outside the frame.
  • Johnson is an Eastern Kentucky transfer who eclipsed the 1,000-yard mark in his only two seasons at Grand Valley State, and he turned heads by running in the high 4.3s at his pro day. He can also elevate, but the question is whether he can separate and read coverage at the NFL level.
  • Bryant has some upside in terms of athleticism and flexibility as a pass-rusher. He needs to work on his technique and learn to play with more consistent pad level, but Bryant likely would have been off the board earlier if not for some character concerns.
  • We are surprised Poyer lasted this long. He shows good technique and has above-average instincts finding and playing the ball. Poyer has experience playing both inside and outside. His lack of an ideal size and speed combination likely caused him to drop this far.
  • Jefferson was converted from quarterback and is a grown man in terms of his frame. He excels as an inline blocker, plays with a chip on his shoulder and works to finish. Jefferson doesn't have great speed to separate, but he has above-average athleticism and strong hands as a pass-catcher.
  • Seymour is an undersized positional blocker who has the quickness and foot speed that zone-heavy teams covet. He can also keep defenders in front of him in pass pro, but he is on the lighter side and lacks power, so he doesn't generate great push as a drive-blocker and can give ground to bull-rushers.
  • Sorenson has a strong arm to make all the throws, but he is a developmental project who must improve his mechanics. In particular, his footwork is inconsistent and he has a ways to go in terms of accuracy and touch. However, he has the physical tools to potentially be molded into a backup.
  • Gragg missed most of the 2012 season with a knee injury, and all of the 2009 season with a dislocated ankle, so there are obviously concerns about his ability to stay healthy at the NFL level. He doesn't have a great frame, either, but he can make an immediate impact as a receiver. He has the speed to work the seam and produce after the catch, plus he has a 37-inch vertical and can win jump-ball situations.
  • Williams has size and flashes some versatility. However, he is still developing in terms of technique and playing with proper pad level, particularly against the run. Williams brings more upside as a pass-rusher at this point, and can potentially add depth up front.
  • Dorsey has the size and enough top-end speed to stretch the field vertically. He averaged over 17 yards per catch and shows the body control, strength and enough leaping ability to win one-on-one downfield battles. Dorsey is raw as a route-runner, but he has the tools to potentially add depth as a fourth or fifth receiver on a roster.
  • Herman is a four-year starter whose average-at-best athletic ability shows up in pass protection at times, but he is an effective run-blocker who fights to stay in position once locked on. He's also a backyard brawler who blocks through the whistle and gets under the skin of defenders.
  • Buchanan has some tightness and isn't an overly flexible athlete. However, he is strong in the core and plays with leverage. He also has active hands and strong motor. He flashes as a counter-puncher as a pass-rusher.
  • Gilkey will likely line up at guard due to his lack of ideal length and lateral agility. He anchors well in pass pro and flashes a strong punch. As a run-blocker, he needs to polish his footwork and initial angles, but he does have enough inline power to get movement once in solid position.
  • Jamison has a low center of gravity and the lateral agility to get in and out of traffic near the line of scrimmage. We also like his finishing ability, and he will will lower his pads on contact. The big knocks on Jamison are his lack of top-end speed and some maturity issues that likely caused him to drop a little.
  • Dawkins is an above-average athlete with active hands. He is undersized and has a hard time anchoring when teams run at him. He also has just average initial quickness and doesn't close well as a pass-rusher.
  • Williams is undersized and lacks power as a runner. He must also learn to be more patient. However, he brings a lot of versatility as a pass-catcher and in the return game, and flashes an extra gear to pop a big play at any point.
  • Powell is a former safety who put on weight and converted to defensive end last year. He has a lot of upside in terms of agility, quickness and raw strength. Powell can play standing up or with his hand in the dirt. He brings a lot of potential as a pass-rusher. He had some off-the-field issues that likely caused him to fall to this point.
  • Barrington is a thickly-built linebacker who packs a heavy punch. He's surprisingly fluid for a 250-pound linebacker and played faster than his times speed indicated. He can improve his run fits and will be a quarter-count late with his recognition at times, but he is a reliable and strong tackler when in position.
  • Bass stacked and shed blockers with better consistency on tape than he did the week of the East-West Shrine Game, raising some concerns about his ability to make the jump to the NFL. He's an effective hand-fighter who flashes above-average speed-to-power moves. He doesn't have great burst or closing speed, though.
  • Dysert has good physical tools and the arm to make all the NFL throws. He shows ability to get through his progressions and was hurt by a lot of drops. Dysert also has underrated mobility within the pocket. Dysert must work on his leadership skills and body language on the field. This is an interesting pick and obviously, one of value. Peyton Manning can probably play another two or three years. Brock Osweiler is the apparent successor, but there's a good chance Dysert will get a chance to really improve as the No. 3 guy and maybe compete for the No. 2 spot by 2014. It gives the Broncos the flexibility to possibly trade one of these two guys down the line.
  • Beauharnais brings above-average instincts and a physical presence to the game. In addition, he has the versatility to put his hand in the dirt and provide some pass rush off the edge. He lacks ideal range and athleticism, though.
  • Questionable mental toughness and a dispute with WSU head coach Mike Leach likely caused Wilson to drop this far. However, on tape we saw a guy with Day 2 talent. He has length and is a smooth route-runner who shows excellent body control and hands adjusting to the ball. He could be a steal at this point if he puts it together. The Bears did not address this position until now. They desperately need other weapons besides Brandon Marshall, the most targeted WR in the NFL. With Devin Hester now primarily a return specialist, it gives Wilson a chance to get on the field quickly if his attitude is right.
  • Daniels has the mobility to run San Francisco's read-option package, but he's undersized and broke his left leg last year. His 52-to-39 touchdown-to-interception ratio also raises a red flag. Arizona's Matt Scott would have been the better pick here in terms of value.
  • Mellete has good size and is a adequate route-runner. He also shows the body control and strength to win downfield battles. However, he lacks ideal top-end speed and had too many body catches throughout his career. Mellete could bring strong value at this point.
  • King has an ideal frame and excellent core strength. He is strong enough to hold his gap at the point of attack. However, he provides very little as a pass-rusher and lacks ideal athleticism in general. King could provide another big body for depth up front as a run-stopper.
  • Fragel moved from tight end to offensive tackle last year and made great strides over the course of the season. There's still work to do in terms of his footwork and recognition skills, but there's no question he has the nasty disposition to play in the NFL. He plays with an edge and flashes the ability to finish.
  • Smith dominated at times at the FCS level, and he stood out during the Texas vs. Nation all-star game. He has active hands and good size, but is inconsistent in terms of motor and pad level.
  • Bowie has a massive frame, and a lot of upside in terms of athleticism and natural power. However, he is raw at this point and needs work in terms of technique and awareness, and will need time to adjust to the NFL level.
  • Ishmael plays with an aggressive demeanor and is active in run support, showing good angles and body control as a tackler. He has some limitations in coverage, though, and can struggle to transition quickly getting off the hash.
  • Motta's stock took a hit when he ran a 4.72 at the NFL combine, but he shows good instincts and range in zone coverage on tape. He's also an aggressive run-stopper who gets downhill and flashes the ability to deliver the big hit.
  • Hepburn has a great frame and thick trunk, providing him with strong point-of-attack skills. However, he lacks ideal instincts and fluidity in space. He can provide depth, but will need to excel on special teams to stick around.
  • Bykoski plays with an edge. However, he is a bit heavy-footed and struggles to move laterally against more explosive edge-rushers. He might be best suited to bump inside to guard at the NFL level.
  • Anthony is a balanced mover who changes directions well. However, he lacks an ideal closing burst and range. We are very impressed with his instincts and ability to get a quick break on the ball.
  • Stafford played the ball better in 2012 and flashed the ability to develop into a playmaker. He also fills hard in run support, but he needs to take better angles, and has a tough time tracking and locating the ball at linebacker depth. His height will be an issue when matched up against tight ends, and he doesn't have the burst to match up with a lot of slot receivers.
  • Renfree has a strong physical skill set and got excellent tutelage under Duke head coach David Cutcliffe. However, a shoulder injury suffered in their bowl game likely caused him to fall. He has a chance to learn from Matt Ryan and develop into an adequate backup.
  • Jones lacks elite size, but shows adequate instincts and athleticism. He must learn to take better angles, but we like his active demeanor down the middle of the field. Jones also has the ability to contribute on special teams as a non-returner.
  • Johnson can get caught lunging and off-balance in pass protection, but he's an adequate positional run blocker. He's also a smart player who can line up at guard or center.
  • Cooper has ideal size, length and strength for a cornerback prospect. He has the potential to make it as a press corner, but he needs to develop in terms of instincts and doesn't have great fluidity to stick with quicker receivers.
  • Cox graduated from Michigan and then transferred to Massachusetts to get more playing time. He has good size and adequate speed, but limited experience is an issue and he hasn't shown he can contribute on third down.
  • Cunningham isn't much of a threat to stretch the field or produce after the catch. He is an above-average blocker and reliable possession receiver who can box out defenders underneath and make plays in traffic.

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