Round 6
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • Evans has above-average diagnostic skills and reads quarterbacks' eyes well. He has adequate range to handle half the field, but he is limited in terms of handling the point in center field. We like his aggressiveness and tackling in run support, and he is not afraid to deliver a big hit. He should add depth and be a quality special-teams contributor.
  • Kush is a blue-collar player with a quick first step, and he has some experience at tackle. The question is whether he can make the adjustment to the speed and complexity of the NFL game after playing at California (Pa.). There are also durability concerns.
  • Fuller has above-average size and works mainly from the slot. He shows strong awareness and has the top-end speed to stretch the middle of the field. Fuller is a bit tight getting out of lateral breaks but has strong ball skills.
  • Kasa has an ideal frame and is an effective positional blocker with an strong inline power base. As a receiver, he doesn't have a ton of upside in terms of athleticism, but he runs adequate routes and can be an effective short-to-intermediate target. This is a real position of need for the Raiders as they got nothing from their TEs a year ago. Kasa doesn't look like a guy who is going to change that trend much.
  • Painter is a one-year starter who has the size, mobility and length to contribute at guard or tackle at the next level. It's important that he improve his power and hand placement. The Broncos' O-line is pretty good overall, so this is a depth pick on a guy who might be able to play any position if he's good enough in pass protection.
  • Swope is a quick starter who can stretch the field. As a slot receiver, he is fearless working the middle of the field and shows great focus in traffic. Swope needs some polish as a route runner, and he has small hands, which can result in a few drops. He also brings versatility as a punt returner, though he does have a history of concussions.
  • Slaughter has some durability issues and saw his senior year cut short, but on tape he has adequate fluidity and the range to hold up at the point. We like his angles in general, and he flashes a physical presence as a tackler. However, he must learn to play more under control when filling the alleys in run support.
  • Quessenberry has good length but a bit of a linear build. He played left tackle in college but showed the ability to kick inside to guard at the Senior Bowl, which might be his best fit at the next level. While he lacks a prototypical anchor, he bends fairly well to gain leverage and has enough foot quickness and arm length to shuffle and mirror to stay in front of rushers.
  • Hopkins is the all-time leading scorer in NCAA history. He has a big leg and can hit from long distance in inclement weather. The ball jumps off his foot, and he drives his kickoffs with more-than-adequate distance.
  • Campbell played some offensive line in addition to defensive tackle at Michigan. He's a powerful interior run-plugger who plays with a good motor and flashes the ability to collapse the pocket. The downside is he's a limited athlete who doesn't have much upside as a pass-rusher.
  • Williams doesn't have ideal length, but he is put together well. He is heavy-handed and shows a powerful punch. He can set the edge in the run game. While he won't win with first-step quickness, Williams has active hands and is relentless as a counterpuncher. He has a junkyard-dog feel to his game, and while he isn't pretty, he scraps and finds a way to make plays.
  • Moody is a former safety who doesn't have great size for a linebacker prospect. He can be engulfed as a run defender, but he can hold up at linebacker because he reads his keys and locates the ball quickly enough to beat blockers to the point. He shows decent range in zone and can re-route receivers at the line of scrimmage.
  • Murray is stocky and has a low center of gravity as a runner. He has above-average balance and shows adequate strength for a 205-pound back. Murray doesn't have game-breaking speed, but he flashes a quick short-area burst to and through the hole. He is still developing as a receiver out of the backfield.
  • Barner is an undersized back who doesn't have great power, and he will bounce out of bounds to avoid contact. The plus side is he has quick feet, accelerates well and makes the most of his blocks. He can also contribute in the return game. The Panthers' offense wants to pound the ball with a physical run game, so Barner has a chance to be a changeup guy.
  • Johnson is a small-school prospect with the height, weight and speed combination to make the jump to the NFL. He's an effective power rusher who can get to the quarterback, but he has to improve his instincts and discipline as a run defender.
  • Rivera is undersized, and he's never going to be anything more than an adequate positional blocker. However, he can make a difference as an 'F' tight end who moves around the formation, primarily lining up in the slot and the backfield. He catches the ball in stride and can make defenders miss in space.
  • Holloman is a hybrid and played the 'spur' position for South Carolina last fall. He is a former safety who lacks ideal range in the back end but has the experience if needed there. His best fit will be as a strongside linebacker. We really like his leverage and ability to take on and get off blocks. Holloman shows adequate range but could learn to be more consistent in space as a tackler. He brings good value at this point and will be a versatile defender who should be able to make an impact on special teams immediately. This is now a 4-3 defense with former OLBs DeMarcus Ware and Anthony Spencer moving to DE, with their hands in the dirt. That leaves the Cowboys with a need for OLB depth.
  • Brown is a big-bodied receiver who brings a physical element to his game. He has some tightness out of his breaks and doesn't always get great separation. However, he does a nice job of using his frame to shield defenders and flashes the ability to win one-on-one downfield battles. He also has versatility as a punt returner. He doesn't have game-breaking speed in this area, but he is consistent fielding the ball, is decisive and can pick up positive yards.
  • Ellington is an undersized change-of-pace back. He has had durability issues throughout his career but remained healthy throughout 2012. Ellington has quick feet and plays faster than his timed speed indicates. In addition, he is one of the more versatile pass-catchers of the running back class. Ellington should provide depth and brings a lot of value at this point. The Cardinals have Rashard Mendenhall and Ryan Williams, but neither has shown explosive qualities and durability has been an issue. So Ellington has a chance to play in nickel packages.
  • Washington has rare size and speed. He has the burst and bend to make an impact off the edge, plus the length and strength to set the edge against the run. While there are concerns about a motor that runs hot and cold, the risk is worth the reward at this point in the draft.
  • James isn't flashy and doesn't excel in any one area. However, he caught our eye at the NFLPA all-star game and does a lot of little things well. James has vision and patience and runs with nice body control and balance. He isn't a burner but can manufacture yards if provided a crease. In addition, he gives great effort on special teams and should make an impact in that area right away.
  • Burkhead is built well, runs with determination and makes the most of his blocks. There are a lot of holes in his game, though. He has marginal top-end speed, has better balance than power and doesn't hold up well in pass protection despite giving good effort. His injury history also raises concerns about his ability to stay healthy in the NFL.
  • Rambo likely dropped due to some minor off-field issues. He has some limitations in coverage, but he is instinctive and has a knack for finding and playing the ball. He also shows a quick close when filling in run support but could clean up his angles. Rambo brings good value at this point and adds immediate depth, and he can eventually develop into a starter down the road.
  • Boyett lacks ideal measurables and athleticism and has some durability issues, and his 2012 season was cut short due to double knee surgery. However, he is a pure football player with outstanding instincts and a natural feel for the game. Boyett has a chance to bolster the back end of a roster if able to return to full health.
  • Palmer is an Illinois transfer who has experience at defensive end and outside linebacker. He ran fairly well at Northwestern's pro day but may not have the speed to turn the corner at the NFL level. He might need to bulk up to improve against the run.
  • Ware doesn't have a great combination of speed and quickness. However, he has a thick trunk and runs with good power and determination. Ware shows the ability to grind out tough yards and has enough lateral agility to occasionally make a defender miss in short areas. He will need to be a heavy contributor on special teams early on while he develops as an offensive player. This is already a very complete RB corps, and the Seahawks added Christine Michael earlier in the draft. So you would think most of Ware's contributions will come on special teams.
  • Bonner isn't the biggest or fastest receiver. However, he has a natural feel for the position and shows some savvy. He does a great job of working defenders in his stem to create separation and has reliable ball skills. He will never be a big-play threat and will need to work for every inch of separation. But Bonner does the little things well and could stick on the back end of the roster as a possession receiver.
  • Baca brings a lot of versatility on the interior. He is just an average athlete and isn't pretty, but he is tough and works to sustain blocks. In pass protection, he shows awareness and gets into proper position. While he lacks ideal lateral agility, he can sustain once he's able to lock on.
  • Hamilton has a big frame and a wide catching radius. He may struggle to create separation underneath and has some occasional drops. However, he is a strong route runner who shows up in the middle of the field. Hamilton also has the size, body control and leaping ability to win one-on-one downfield battles.
  • Jones is an overachiever who makes up for his below-average measurables, including marginal top-end speed, with tenacity and toughness. He doesn't take snaps off or back down. He's also an effective hand fighter who can get off blocks even if he gives ground initially.
  • Riddick played a hybrid running back/receiver role for Notre Dame. He is undersized but is a gifted athlete who is quicker than fast. Riddick brings a lot of versatility to the Lions' spread offense with his ability to create in space. The Lions have been trying to fix this position for a long time, and it looks as if free-agent acquisition Reggie Bush will give them versatility. But Riddick should be able to contribute in nickel packages as an outlet receiver, and it will be interesting to see if the coaches can figure out a way to have Riddick and Bush on the field at the same time.
  • Lewis-Moore suffered a major knee injury in the BCS title game and would have been off the board much earlier if he were healthy. He has a strong anchor at the point of attack and heavy hands to get off blocks. In addition, he has upside as an interior pass-rusher. We viewed Lewis-Moore as one of the most underrated prospects in the nation prior to the knee injury. The Ravens have really attacked the D-line this offseason, and they have six guys who look like they can produce. That should allow Lewis-Moore to take his time to get healthy.
  • Griffin is a reliable possession receiver who has adequate burst after the catch and the frame to develop into an effective in-line blocker. He has just average top-end speed, though, and he doesn't project as a big-play threat at the next level.
  • Wooten has quick feet and adequate instincts. However, he is a bit tight and can struggle to limit separation when left on an island in man coverage. Wooten is willing to step up in run support but needs to clean up his angles and technique as a tackler.
  • Jensen will likely have to move to guard after playing tackle in college because of concerns about his length and body control. He has the footwork, initial quickness and nasty disposition to develop into a starting guard in the NFL in time.
  • Wilson has a sturdy, thick build with strong point-of-attack skills as a lead blocker. He isn't a great athlete but can grind out yards in short-yardage situations. Smith plays with a physical demeanor and is willing to do the dirty work the position requires.
  • McGee has an ideal frame and bulk. He has strong point-of-attack skills. However, he lacks quickness and athleticism. McGee brings depth as another big body in run support.
  • Williams is a physical interior run-stopper who brings a lot of leadership to the position. He doesn't have exceptional athleticism, but he has an above-average closing burst once pointed in the right direction. He also flashes as a blitzer. Williams should provide depth as a two-down inside linebacker.

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