Round 4
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Watkins is a versatile defensive back who can line up at safety or corner, and he has the mentality to be an effective special-teams player. He's instinctive and fluid and has above-average recovery speed.

    How he fits: 

    Philly has decent corners but no real difference-makers. Watkins is versatile -- he can play inside or outside, corner or safety -- and has very good instincts. He can also chip in on special teams.
  • What he brings: 

    Breeland masks his lack of ideal top-end speed by using his longer arms (31 3/4 inches) to slow and reroute receivers at the line of scrimmage. He's also a natural pass-catcher capable of developing into a playmaker.

    How he fits: 

    Washington plays a lot of zone coverage because its corners are not really turn-and-run guys. That is in line with Breeland's strengths and skill set. He locates the ball nicely and has good instincts. This defense really needs guys who can create turnovers, and Breeland can help in that area.
  • What he brings: 

    Freeman doesn't have great speed, power or size. He's a better football player than athlete. He's an elite competitor who has above-average vision, is quicker than fast and can contribute on third down.

    How he fits: 

    Freeman will add depth to a running back corps that really underachieved in 2013 despite having Steven Jackson and Jacquizz Rodgers. Freeman will provide toughness and competes every down. He's not special but is really dependable.
  • What he brings: 

    Saunders is an undersized slot receiver and return man who has the burst to get open underneath and produce after the catch. He's a small target with small hands, but he consistently extends and snatches the ball out of the air.

    How he fits: 

    This offense lacks receivers who can separate from defenders, as the Jets look to throw a lot of underneath crossing routes and screen passes. This guy should fit nicely in the slot, as he can get away from tight coverage. He can also contribute as a return specialist.
  • What he brings: 

    Stork almost always finds a way to get the job done, masking his physical limitations with effort, toughness and smarts.

    How he fits: 

    New England's O-line really struggled holding up inside a year ago, and QB Tom Brady really hates A-gap pressure. Stork is savvy and can handle all the spread sets and no-huddle schemes that put blockers in space. He's likely a backup now and a starter down the line.
  • What he brings: 

    Ellington has excellent play speed with quickness and explosiveness out of his cuts. He shows a strong feel for the position, strong hands and good toughness working the middle of the field.

    How he fits: 

    The 49ers added Stevie Johnson in a trade and continue to revamp their WR corps with this versatile receiving threat. He likely will be used in the slot in three-wide-receiver sets, where he can use his quickness to separate from defenders.
  • What he brings: 

    At 6-foot-1 and 334 pounds, Ellis takes up a lot of space in the middle and is tough to move off the ball. He's still developing as a hand-fighter but has heavy hands and flashes the ability to get off blocks. He projects as a two-down player because he doesn't have the burst to make an impact rushing the passer and wears down quickly.

    How he fits: 

    A year ago, Oakland was really vulnerable up front and gave up too many plays inside. Ellis, a two-gap space-eater, should help alleviate those issues. He can play DT or NT, but won't add much as a pass-rusher.
  • What he brings: 

    Marsh is an adequate edge setter who plays with a chip on his shoulder, plus he has active hands and shows good effort rushing the passer. On the flip side, he doesn't have great size and can give ground if he doesn't keep his pads down. He doesn't have great burst or closing speed rushing off the edge, either.

    How he fits: 

    Free agency and injuries robbed Seattle of some of its depth on the D-line, but Marsh's addition is a step toward restocking it. He is somewhat undersized as an LDE but is a "try-hard" guy who fits Pete Carroll's one-gap penetration, attacking scheme.
  • What he brings: 

    Cockrell is an experienced and productive player. He has strong instincts and underrated man coverage skills. Cockrell also shows the willingness to step up and set the edge in run support.

    How he fits: 

    Cockrell is a dependable guy with a ton of experience and production. The Bills want to play more man, and he's a solid turn-and-run player.
  • What he brings: 

    Alexander is a big, physical and aggressive safety who will come up and slam defenders in run support. He also has underrated instincts and range in coverage.

    How he fits: 

    This is the second safety St. Louis has taken (Lamarcus Joyner, Round 2), as the Rams focus on solidifying their back end. In this scheme, Alexander can sit back and use his ball skills in center field.
  • What he brings: 

    Bodine has average athleticism and inline power. However, he takes strong angles, has quality technique and works to sustain blocks in the run game. He is one of the toughest interior linemen in this class and plays with a nasty demeanor.

    How he fits: 

    This O-line needs help inside, and Bodine can step in at guard or center. The Bengals want to be more of a power running game, which suits Bodine, a physical mauler, very well.
  • What he brings: 

    Jones is a massive nose tackle with the size and strength to anchor a 4-3 or 3-4 defense. He can hold his ground against double-teams and helps keep his linebackers clean. He's never going to be a high-volume sack player, but he's an adequate bull rusher who flashes the ability to collapse the pocket.

    How he fits: 

    Jones fits as an NT/DT run-stuffer who makes his biggest impact against the run. He doesn't offer much as a pass-rusher, but D-coordinator Ray Horton will love his ability to penetrate as a two-gapper.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams is a big back who has natural power and deceptive top-end speed. Although he has average lateral agility, he has nimble feet. He lacks ideal versatility and provides little in the passing game. Williams is a workhorse who can shoulder a heavy workload.

    How he fits: 

    The Giants are looking to upgrade their rushing attack with this pick and their previous moves in free agency. Williams is a tough inside runner but needs to improve a lot in the passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Colvin's stock dipped after he tore an ACL at the Senior Bowl, where he had been practicing well. He could turn out to be an excellent value if he can get and stay healthy. He's an above-average athlete with good instincts in coverage and is an above-average run-stopper.

    How he fits: 

    Colvin isn't very big, but he provides depth in the secondary. The question is whether he can hold up in Jacksonville's preferred press-man scheme.
  • What he brings: 

    Evans has above-average size and is more of a straight-line route runner with quality top-end speed to stretch the field. He has strong hands and uses his frame well in traffic. He lacks ideal quickness and burst out of breaks and might struggle to create adequate separation with underneath routes.

    How he fits: 

    The Jets have now added a tight end and two wide receivers in this draft in hopes of upgrading their listless passing attack. Evans has good size and possession skills and might be a key player on third-down conversions.
  • What he brings: 

    There are concerns about McGill's lack of production, durability and maturity, but the risk could very well be worth the reward at this point. He has a rare combination of length (33 1/4 inches), bulk and top-end speed for a corner. He's also capable of competing for jump balls with bigger receivers and has above-average overall ball skills.

    How he fits: 

    McGill is a big, physical cornerback (think Brandon Browner) who has the aggressive man press skills that blitzing teams such as Oakland covet. He has the requisite talent to succeed when placed on an island in coverage.
  • What he brings: 

    Carey has average size and top-end speed. He runs with a slashing style and can stick his foot in the ground to quickly get vertical. He also runs with excellent determination and finishes strong despite his lack of size.

    How he fits: 

    With Michael Bush gone, Chicago didn't have a great No. 2 running back option. Enter Carey, who has the quickness and competitiveness to give himself a chance at playing early in his career. He won't threaten Matt Forte but could play a role in the Bears' screen game.
  • What he brings: 

    Bryant is a long, fluid and flexible athlete who can flat-out fly and stretch the field vertically. He has tremendous upside, but must learn to be more consistent catching the ball and continue to mature and dedicate himself to maximize the talent he possesses in terms of physical tools.

    How he fits: 

    Bryant reminds some people of Chris Henry, as he's a long guy with great developmental qualities. He has a chance to be a good vertical threat in this offense.
  • What he brings: 

    Hitchens is an instinctive run defender with decent range and the finishing burst to deliver big hits. He's not as effective in coverage as he lacks the fluid hips to hold up in man and doesn't show great awareness in underneath zone.

    How he fits: 

    Hitchens fits best as an SOLB, as he is good in run support and could be strong in the zone coverages Dallas will play. He's also adept at blitzing from his linebacker spot.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas is a giant who has outstanding raw physical tools, providing him with one of the higher ceilings in this quarterback class. However, he is a big-time developmental project. Thomas is a thrower, not a passer, right now and must improve his footwork, touch and accuracy. However, he has excellent athleticism and mobility to work off schedule.

    How he fits: 

    Thomas is the ultimate developmental pick. He's not ready to play now but boasts all the physical tools to be successfulbig arm, excellent work ethic and size. He was inconsistent because of a marginal supporting cast at Virginia Tech, but his tools and drive could help him succeed. Carson Palmer, who is still performing at a high level, affords the Cardinals time in developing Thomas, making this an astute pick and well worth the gamble.
  • What he brings: 

    Bradford has a lot of upside and is an above-average athlete with explosiveness and top-end speed. He needs to get stronger against the run but flashes as a pass-rusher. He also brings added value on special teams.

    How he fits: 

    He is primarily an edge 3-4 pass-rusher and will really help on special teams. He is serviceable against the run and should be viewed as a depth pick and a candidate to play in sub packages.
  • What he brings: 

    Huff isn't a playmaker, and, although he has played both positions, he shows better instincts at corner than at safety. He has the size, speed and suddenness to develop into an effective cover corner with improved footwork, and he's an above-average run defender for the position.

    How he fits: 

    Huff is a good athlete and, even though he's listed as a safety, might be better as a corner, which is a bigger need for Tennessee.
  • What he brings: 

    Norwood is a possession-type receiver who shows strong hands and excellent focus in traffic. He has a knack for coming up with big plays at critical moments. Norwood also has excellent awareness and a good feel working against zone coverage. He has a chance to bring strong return at this point.

    How he fits: 

    Norwood is a savvy, do-it-all guy with great possession skills. He comes up with big plays and excels when plays break down.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas' slight frame raises concerns about his ability to stay healthy at the NFL level, and he's not going to pick up many yards after contact. There are also concerns about his work ethic. His ability to make plays in space and in the passing game makes him a good value here, though. He can shake defenders one-on-one, reaches his top-end speed quickly and plays faster than timed.

    How he fits: 

    Thomas will replace departed RB Dexter McCluster as Kansas City's versatile threat. He will work out of the slot, will line up as an RB and is a big-play option in the screen game.
  • What he brings: 

    Aikens has excellent size and is an explosive athlete. Although he lacks ideal top-end speed, he shows strong eyes in coverage and has above-average ball skills. Aikens has a lot of upside as a press man- or zone-type corner.

    How he fits: 

    Atkins is a big press corner with good ball skills who should fit this secondary nicely. He has developmental upside, but it will take time.
  • What he brings: 

    Fortt has outstanding range as a run defender and the natural ability to develop into an effective cover linebacker at 6-foot-2 and 248 pounds. The problem is his production doesn't match his ability. Below-average instincts and too many missed tackles are concerns.

    How he fits: 

    Fortt is intense and a good third-down player against the run. But can he adjust to all the movement and the multiple schemes Rob Ryan uses in this defense?
  • What he brings; 

    Desir is a rangy press-type corner with excellent range. He has strong ball skills and has had a ton of ball production, including 10 interceptions the past two years. He is still developing in terms of instincts and must continue to get stronger. However, he shows the willingness to set the edge.

    How he fits: 

    He could be the perfect backup outside corner on this defense. Desir has excellent ball skills, evidenced by his 10 INTs the past two years, and excels in man-press schemes. He's raw but a good developmental prospect.
  • What he brings: 

    Boston is a physical and reliable run-stopper who doesn't miss many open-field tackles and is capable of lining up in the box even though he doesn't have elite size. He shows good range, and, although he has dropped passes he should have caught, he also has shown the ability to make plays in coverage.

    How he fits: 

    Boston has great instincts at the back and the ball skills to become a ball hawk. He also will contribute on special teams.
  • What he brings: 

    Johnson can cover a lot of ground in coverage thanks to above-average instincts and top-end speed. He's also versatile enough to line up at corner or safety. His 6-foot-2, 200-pound frame is somewhat misleading, though, as he has average arm length (31 1/2 inches) and smaller hands (8 5/8 inches) for the position.

    How he fits: 

    The 49ers want their cornerbacks to be aggressive, and Johnson certainly fits that mold.
  • What he brings: 

    White lacks ideal top-end speed and home run hitting speed. However, he is an instinctive runner who shows good balance and lateral agility to string together multiple cuts to weave in and out of traffic. White also shows better power than his measurables indicate and has a nose for the end zone.

    How he fits: 

    Bill Belichick values running backs with versatile skills, so expect the Pats to use White in a variety of roles. He has good quickness and feel for finding holes.
  • What he brings: 

    Vereen is a versatile player who can line up at safety, line up over slot receivers and line up on the outside. He shows good range in zone and balance in man. He's also tough against the run. The lone knocks are that he doesn't have great ball skills and doesn't have the length or size to compete for jump balls with bigger receivers.

    How he fits: 

    Vereen has good ball skills and can play the slot or outside, so he offers Chicago plenty of versatility.
  • What he brings: 

    Pierre-Louis is a rangy linebacker with excellent top-end speed and change-of-direction skills. He is still developing in terms of instincts and must get stronger against the run. Pierre-Louis will bring immediate value on special teams.

    How he fits: 

    Pierre-Louis could fit nicely with all of the combo coverages and various looks Seattle uses, although he might not be an ideal two-down linebacker.
  • What he brings: 

    Lawson impressed us with his balance, fluidity and quickness at the East-West Shrine Game. He played well enough there to get invited to the Senior Bowl, where he continued to perform well. He's undersized, so he's going to have a tough time matching up with bigger receivers on the outside, but he has the cover skills, instincts and toughness to develop into a good nickel corner.

    How he fits: 

    Lawson is a slot corner guy with good quickness and short-area skills. He could step in quickly as a third corner.
  • What he brings: 

    Urban is an excellent value at this point. He's versatile enough to set the edge at end and kick inside to rush the passer. He's a shade under 6-foot-7 and has some problems keeping his pads down, but he has the length to press tackles off his frame and the heavy hands to get off blocks. He doesn't have to get to the quarterback to disrupt an opponent's passing attack, either. He does a good job of getting his hands in passing lanes.

    How he fits: 

    Urban is a natural 3-4 DE, but he can kick inside in four-man fronts. He is a developmental prospect who can add some production and push inside.
  • What he brings: 

    Savage has prototypical size and might have the best arm talent in the entire class. He can make all the throws and showed great poise to stand in the pocket behind a very poor offensive line this year. Savage must learn to speed up his internal clock and has limited mobility, but he does have enough pocket mobility to slide and buy time.

    How he fits: 

    This was a huge need the Texans were able to address in the middle rounds. Bill O'Brien will have fun developing him, but he probably won't be ready to do much as a rookie. He has a huge arm, good mobility and physical toughness. O'Brien demands a lot from his QBs (read defenses, call protections, identify hot routes, etc.), and Savage can handle it all. He should develop the mental aspect of the game quickly.
  • What he brings: 

    Webster is extremely raw with limited experience, but he has tremendous upside with a long frame and athleticism. He is a former basketball player, and it shows with agility and explosiveness. He must continue to develop strength, though. Webster is a developmental prospect who can play DE or potentially convert to a TE at the next level.

    How he fits: 

    Webster has interesting upside. A former basketball player, Webster is blessed with great athletic ability but is rather raw skillwise. He could develop into a good pass-rusher.
  • What he brings: 

    Dozier is a small-school player who boosted his draft stock with a strong showing at the East-West Shrine Game, and he has the nasty disposition teams covet in their offensive linemen. However, he likely will have to move inside to guard because he has problems protecting the edge in pass protection and needs to improve his hand placement as a run-blocker.

    How he fits: 

    Dozier is a tough guy who is not exciting but will compete and add serious toughness to this unit as a backup/swing tackle.
  • What he brings: 

    Taliaferro isn't much of a big-play threat, but he's an underrated big back (6 feet, 229 pounds) who makes defenses earn every tackle and can push the pile in short-yardage situations. You also like what he brings to the table on a third down. He is a smart and strong pass-blocker who can catch the ball well.



    How he fits: 

    Taliaferro is a tough inside runner who provides insurance with Ray Rice's looming legal issues.
  • What he brings: 

    Shembo needs to get stronger at the point of attack against the run. However, he brings good value as an edge pass-rusher. He has a quick first step and flashes explosive closing burst when catching the edge. Shembo also shows good range as a run defender.

    How he fits: 

    Shembo is an edge guy who fits best as an upfield rusher, but he struggles when teams run directly at him.
  • What he brings: 

    Fleming has some development to do in terms of playing with better pad level and lacks ideal lateral agility. However, he is a big body who has length and excellent awareness to develop into a starter at right tackle.

    How he fits: 

    Fleming would've seriously benefited from learning under Dante Scarnecchia had the Pats' veteran OL coach not retired. Fleming's fundamentals need serious attention, but he's a mauler who wins with his size.