Round 4
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Barkley has just average size and arm strength, but outstanding leadership skills. He did not get good protection in 2012, which brought up concerns about his average mobility and athleticism. However, he is one of the more polished products from the quarterback class, coming from the USC pro-style system that relied on getting through progressions. When able to throw with rhythm and timing, he has the anticipation and accuracy to succeed and develop into an adequate starter.

    How he fits: 

    On one hand, this did not look like a critical need because the Eagles already have Michael Vick, Nick Foles and Dennis Dixon. But with a new coaching staff, you get the feeling Chip Kelly would like to develop his own guy. Although it would appear that Barkley doesn't fit the skill set that Kelly prefers his quarterbacks to have, Barkley is a very cerebral player and should be able to run the high volume of plays and make adjustments on the run, which this offense demands.
  • What he brings: 

    Johnson is physical run-stopper who possesses above-average point-of-attack skills. He plays with leverage and flashes active hands to disengage from blocks. While he has just average athleticism and may have restrictions in coverage, he makes a quick diagnosis and takes proper angles in pursuit to maximize his range as a run defender.

    How he fits: 

    This will continue to be a 3-4 defense and one of the starting ILBs, Derrick Johnson, is terrific. But next to him, the Chiefs have a little bit of a hole. Akeem Jordan has been a guy who can stay on the field and play with consistency and backup Zac Diles is just a guy. The Chiefs need to be more physical inside, and even if Johnson is only a two-down run defender, that will be enough production because Johnson stays on the field.
  • What he brings: 

    Spence flashes the ability to shoot gaps and he can control blockers with his hands when he stays low. The key is staying low, because he can give ground when he doesn't. He is also a better pass-rusher than production would suggest, and an active hand fighter with quick feet.

    How he fits: 

    The Bucs' defensive line should be better than it has played, and it is due for a little bit of a makeover. DT Gerald McCoy is a solid Pro Bowl player, but at the other DT spot, Gary Gibson and Derek Landri are just guys. Although the Bucs were really good against the run in 2012, the coaches like a strong DL rotation and Spence can give them added depth inside and possibly compete for a slot next to McCoy.
  • What he brings: 

    Sanders is undersized, quicker than fast and shows ability to create separation and is most effective working from slot. He is dangerous with the ball in his hand with the ability to get in and out of traffic. Sanders also brings versatility as a punt returner.

    How he fits: 

    He adds depth to a receiving group that has a chance to develop. Justin Blackmon looks like the real deal and Cecil Shorts seems to be coming on. Backups Mohamed Massaquoi and Jordan Shipley are decent, but not necessarily elite. Sanders is a small guy who plays faster than his 40 time and his role early on will likely be as a fourth or fifth receiver. However, he could become the Jaguars' primary return guy, which is actually a bigger need.
  • What he brings: 

    Boyce is a physical receiver who ran extremely fast at the combine. His tape doesn't always show that game-breaking speed, but he is a quick starter who flashes good pop out of cuts to create separation. While he shows ability to make the tough catch outside of the cylinder he also has his share of drops. Boyce is strong in traffic and can work from the slot and outside the hashes.

    How he fits: 

    The Patriots continue to rebuild their receiving corps with their second WR in the draft. They are really trying to add more speed and vertical explosiveness outside, and that's what Boyce should give them. They really haven't had that outside threat since Randy Moss. The Pats have loads of options in the short-to-intermediate passing game, but they need a guy to stretch the defense. They hope that's what Boyce can do.
  • What he brings: 

    Okafor has ideal size and length as an OLB in the the Cardinals' 3-4 scheme. He flashes at times with quickness, flexibility and ability to convert speed to power as a pass-rusher. However, he must learn to play with a consistent motor, which is something that likely dropped him into the third round despite his second-round skill set.

    How he fits: 

    Although he's listed as a DE, he probably fits best in this 3-4 defense as a rush OLB. Sam Acho is one quality starter and free-agent pickup Lorenzo Alexander is the other projected starter. But Okafor has a chance to compete with Alexander and at the very least add OLB depth. The Cardinals really need him to set the edge versus the outside run, which was a problem a year ago.
  • What he brings: 

    Jenkins is an ideal weakside linebacker who holds up well in space and excels in coverage. He has a great feel for throwing lanes and does a great job of reading quarterbacks' eyes. He also shows ideal range against the run. However, he has issues taking on and shedding blocks. In addition, Jenkins has had trouble staying healthy, and those durability concerns likely pushed him into the third round.

    How he fits: 

    The Dolphins have made a nice transition from a 3-4 scheme to a 4-3, and they really want versatility to play a lot of sub packages. They are decent right now with their OLB starters, but their depth isn't good enough. They don't have enough developmental guys, and where Jenkins could likely make his early mark is in those sub packages, especially versus the pass. That is a real strength of his, and that's not necessarily the case for the guys ahead of him.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams is an aggressive player who closes in a hurry and shows good body control as a tackler. He has above-average fluidity and range in coverage, but must continue to develop in terms of instincts, which in turn will help him improve as a playmaker.

    How he fits: 

    The Bills are decent at safety with one elite player, Jairus Byrd, but the other projected starter, Da'Norris Searcy, is unproven and the depth is not overly exciting. When you add to the fact that the Bills will play a nickel 4-2-5 scheme as their base package, the ability to mix and match the DBs is a real advantage. At the very least, Williams is a solid player in all areas and should add depth to this group.
  • What he brings: 

    Sims has excellent size, and while he isn't a blazer he is agile for his size and shows above-average body control and hands as a pass-catcher. He does a nice job of being physical and using his frame to shield defenders to secure contested throws. He flashes a strong inline power base and can get into position to seal off defenders, but can work on playing with more consistent pad level as a blocker.

    How he fits: 

    The Dolphins lost Anthony Fasano in free agency; he was their only real pass-catching TE, but certainly not elite in that area. They replaced Fasano with veteran UFA Dustin Keller, who has virtually the same skill set. The backups are probably better blockers than receivers, although Charles Clay has a chance to give them something in the passing game if he can stay healthy. As this coaching staff tries to get the TE more involved in the pass offense, it really has a need for that matchup, pass-catching TE. Sims doesn't appear to be that guy, although he has a solid skill set.
  • What he brings: 

    Schwenke isn't and exceptional athlete, but he has a quick first step to get into position and cut off defenders. He also sinks well in pass pro to anchor against power moves. Schwenke caught some momentum at the Senior Bowl and has the versatility to line up at both guard and center at the next level. In addition, Schwenke plays with an edge and has one of the nastiest dispositions of any offensive lineman in this class.

    How he fits: 

    The big concern with this unit leading into the draft was inside. All three interior starters from 2012 wound up on IR. The only returning guy is C Fernando Velasco, whom the coaches really seem to like. He can also play guard. To the Titans' credit, they added two solid guards in free agency in Andy Levitre, who can be special, and Rob Turner. Schwenke looks like a depth pick who could back up at center and possibly challenge Turner at guard down the line.
  • What he brings: 

    Kugbila has a massive frame, long arms and big hands. He dominated at times at the Division II level. He has above-average athleticism, but he needs development in terms of technique. Kugbila can also learn to become more of a finisher.

    How he fits: 

    The play of the Panthers' O-line is very important because of the team's commitment to the run. The only two guys Carolina can really count on are LT Jordan Gross and OC Ryan Kalil. There may be some concern at RT, and all three interior positions could use an upgrade. Kugbila will give the Panthers athletic depth with a nice skill set, and he may have a year to develop into a more consistent player.
  • What he brings: 

    Bakhtiari has adequate length but can continue to add bulk in his lower half. He is an agile athlete who can shuffle and mirror in pass pro. He doesn't have an ideal inline power base but he shows ability to get into position to cover up defenders and open up creases. If Bakhtiari can continue to develop his strength and power he has a chance to develop into an adequate edge protector.

    How he fits: 

    Poor O-line play has led to a marginal running game and breakdowns in pass protection. A lot of the problems are on the left side with LT Marshall Newhouse and LG T.J. Lang. And that's where most of the breakdowns occur. The Packers could move solid RT Bryan Bulaga to LT to replace Newhouse if promising LT Derek Sherrod continues to have problems staying healthy. That leaves Bakhtiari as an option to push Newhouse at LT or possibly move in at RT if Bulaga goes to the other side. There are a lot of moving parts here.
  • What he brings: 

    Nassib has a sturdy build and improved throughout his career. He has also made strides as a decision-maker. However, his release is not fluid and he struggles to change up release points, which can affect his accuracy when he is not on a level platform. Finally, he lacks ideal touch and struggles to change ball speed and trajectory. He has the mental makeup to develop if he continues to work on his mechanics.

    How he fits: 

    This is obviously a value pick for the Giants as they looked at who was left on their board. They have one solid backup behind Eli Manning in veteran David Carr. Nassib has a chance to really develop into a very solid QB, and because Manning is not really close to the end of his career, this coaching staff could either develop Nassib as a potential trade asset, or let him move into the No. 2 spot as a long-term backup.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas has a sawed-off and compact build. He brings an explosive and physical element to the game, and his motor never quits. Thomas also has the versatility to handle middle-of-the-field responsibilities, as well as drop down near the box and hold up in man coverage. He also is a very effective blitzer. Thomas' game reminds us of former Colts safety Bob Sanders.

    How he fits: 

    Age and health at safety make this a real need for the Steelers. Troy Polamalu may be nearing the end of his career, and the other starter, Ryan Clark, is also an aging veteran. There is not a lot of quality depth behind them. Thomas gives the Steelers a guy who has exactly the skill set they are looking for in this defense. He will have every chance to step in as a starter in the next couple of years.
  • What he brings: 

    Wilson is the wild card of this quarterback class. He was hampered by a coaching change as a senior, and did not show as much consistency after Bobby Petrino left. His decision-making took a step back in 2012 as well. However, he is tough both mentally and physically, and has a knack for changing release points to make an accurate throw off balance. Wilson doesn't have an elite arm, but can make all the throws. If handled properly, Wilson could potentially end up being one of the steals in this year's QB class.

    How he fits: 

    This organization hopes that Matt Flynn can carry it for a long time, but that remains to be seen. The only other QB on the roster is Terrelle Pryor, who is an unknown because of a lack of reps. Wilson is not ready to play but has really intriguing developmental qualities. He could certainly be the eventual starter in this offense and could be forced to play sooner than expected if Flynn sputters or if Pryor isn't the answer.
  • What he brings: 

    Jones is a versatile offensive linemen who has the smarts and experience to play any position along the offensive line. He masks physical limitations with effort and technique. Durability concerns and lack of elite physical tools likely caused him to fall this far.

    How he fits: 

    Nine different players started on this O-line in 2012. The line really struggled with consistency, although it performed better late in the season as it got a little healthier. The weakness of this unit is probably on the right side, but the overall depth needs to be upgraded. Jones can bring versatility to this group, because he has played all three positions along the O-line, and he certainly has the smarts and instincts to step in quickly.
  • What he brings: 

    Webb has exceptional movement and man coverage skills. He has quick feet and transitions well out of his cuts. In addition, he flashes instincts and has a quick closing burst to make up ground with the ball in the air. However, Webb brings very little as a run defender and lacks interest in this department on tape. He brings good value as a pure cover cornerback, though.

    How he fits: 

    The Cowboys' starters at CB, Morris Claiborne and Brandon Carr, are man-to-man, turn-and-run cover guys who are now making the adjustment to a new Cover 2 scheme that asks them to squat more and be more physical. No. 3 corner Orlando Scandrick is decent as an inside guy in Dallas' nickel package. Webb doesn't really seem to fit the Cover 2 because he is not overly physical and not productive versus the run. He will probably have his best shot at competing with Scandrick to be the nickel corner.
  • What he brings: 

    Jones in one of the more natural throwers in this quarterback class, and can be a marksman when given a clean pocket to throw from. He changes up trajectory and shows ability to drive the ball accurately down the field and outside the hashes. However, pressure has been his kryptonite and Jones must learn to become a better decision-maker under duress. He will have a chance to sit, learn and develop, which could help him become an above-average starter down the road.

    How he fits: 

    We never think of the Steelers as a team with a QB need because Ben Roethlisberger is so tough and dependable, although his playing style leaves him open to injuries. They have not had a legitimate backup for a long time. Right now, veteran Bruce Gradkowski is in that role, but there doesn't seem to be a feeling that he could step in and thrive if Big Ben were to go down. Jones is a smart, productive guy from a big program. He should be able to step into the backup role a lot sooner than most people think. His skill set may mix nicely with this short-to-intermediate passing game that uses a lot of no-huddle and play-action.
  • What he brings: 

    Watford doesn't show great awareness on tape, which raises concerns about ability to handle to the complexity and speed of NFL defenses. His ability to match up physically isn't as much of a concern following strong showings against West Virginia and at the East-West Shrine game. He is an effective drive-blocker who plays with an edge and he has the foot speed to stay in front of defenders in pass pro.

    How he fits: 

    This O-line may have been one of the weakest units in the NFL last season. It has holes all the way across the front. With their second guard in this draft, the Cardinals are working to solidify the inside of this group, but there is still work to be done. The coaches seem to believe that this unit is better than we think if the players are healthy. That's the biggest question we have to answer, and that answer will tell us a lot in terms of how quickly Watford is asked to contribute.
  • What he brings: 

    Greene lacks an ideal anchor and will never be a strong point-of-attack defender. However, the former safety has a knack for finding the ball and manufacturing big plays in coverage, as a tackler and as a blitzer. In addition, he is a missile when closing in pursuit and can deliver a violent strike on ball carriers. Greene also brings added value on special teams and is an excellent value at this point.

    How he fits: 

    The LB corps used to be the strength of the Bears, but that is no longer the case. Their best OLB, Lance Briggs, is aging and may be near the end at WOLB. Newly-acquired SOLB James Anderson is on a one-year contract, and there is very little depth behind them. Greene has a chance to learn for a year while being the swing OLB. In 2014, he may be asked to step in and start at either spot. His learning curve needs to progress quickly.
  • What he brings: 

    Porter must continue to develop his core strength. However, he is an adequate athlete who played more at the second level as a traditional linebacker and should fit well as a weakside linebacker for the Bengals. Porter also is a strong blitzer who shows ability to bend the edge and transition speed-to-power off the edge.

    How he fits: 

    The Bengals' three LB starters should be solid with SOLB Rey Maualuga re-signing, James Harrison coming over from Pittsburgh and last year's OLB, Vontaze Burfict, moving inside to MLB. In their 4-3 defense, the Bengals don't need a lot of pass rush out of their OLBs, which is actually what these guys do best. So the coaches may ask Porter to help out more in sub packages and versus the pass, although he's probably better in zone coverage than man to man. The Bengals are hoping he can develop into a good swing OLB.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas was the leading tackler for Fresno State and brings a lot of versatility to the position. He has strong eyes in coverage and finds the ball quickly. Thomas brings good ball production to the table as well, and led the FBS with eight interceptions in 2012. The only knock on Thomas is that he lacks elite range and closing burst.

    How he fits: 

    This organization has been trying to fix the safety position for a long time without much success. It has been a revolving door of mediocre players. The Redskins secondary gives up too many big plays between the hashes, and tight ends who can run vertical seam routes really expose starting safeties Brandon Meriweather and Reed Doughty. There do not appear to be backups who can develop into potential starters. That forces the coaches to use their linebackers more in coverage, which has a trickle-down effect. Thomas will have every chance in the world to be in the mix early as a potential starter.
  • What he brings: 

    Hodges will have to improve his ability to take on blocks and hold up in a phone booth if he's to develop into an every-down player. He does show good range as a run defender and he can help a team on third down early in his career. He matches up well with tight ends as well as backs in man coverage and he shows good instincts plus range in zone coverage.

    How he fits: 

    Starting OLBs Chad Greenway and Aaron Henderson are solid players, but this is a defense that plays a lot of nickel personnel. When the Vikings get out of their base scheme, neither player is great at dropping into coverage and neither is a turn-and-run cover guy. Hodges has good cover skills and is really solid in space. He seems to be a perfect fit for the Vikings' sub packages as a guy who can play on third down and fill in as a swing guy on first and second down.
  • What he brings: 

    Holmes has ample experience and takes solid initial angles as a run-blocker. However, he lacks an ideal anchor and has just an average inline power base. He struggles with size and power on the interior. In pass pro, he shows adequate awareness and flashes ability to sink and anchor.

    How he fits: 

    This O-line really struggled a year ago, and Colts QB Andrew Luck cannot continue to get hit as often as he did in 2012. The coaches want more size and physicality in this unit, as it has been a finesse group for the past several years. Holmes doesn't really seem to be a perfect fit for this new philosophy. He's not a power guy at the point of attack and doesn't dominate inside, but he does give the Colts a little more depth. With two new inside OL draft picks, Luck should be able to avoid some of that inside pressure that QBs hate.
  • What he brings: 

    Tretter is agile athlete who is light on his feet. He consistently gets into solid position, and while he lacks an ideal inline power base he is flexible and bends well to gain leverage. He has just average power in his upper body in pass pro, but does a nice job of shuffling and mirroring to stay in front of defenders. Tretter will need to continue to develop his awareness making the leap to the NFL level, but he is a quick learner who should get up to speed fairly quickly.

    How he fits: 

    The Packers have really worked to upgrade the physicality of their O-line. That has a trickle-down effect to the run game. Tretter actually fits the Packers' scheme nicely, because they are a zone-blocking group that has used a lot of finesse plays in the past to get production in the run game. The Packers? O-line hasn't been overly physical between the tackles, but that could change with RB Eddie Lacy in the fold. Tretter can give Green Bay some much-needed depth at center and guard.
  • What he brings: 

    Harper is a big-bodied receiver who can shield defenders from the ball and shows good body control competing for jump balls downfield. He is a smart and physical route runner who busts zone looks, but he doesn't have the burst to consistently separate from underneath man coverage at the NFL level.

    How he fits: 

    The Seahawks added the speed guy they were looking for in Percy Harvin, and Golden Tate has a chance to become a special player. When you add Sidney Rice and Doug Baldwin to the mix, that's four guys with a lot of potential to upgrade this passing game. What Harper can give Seattle is size and the ability to be a chain-mover, especially on third down and in the red zone.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams doesn't have ideal size for a defensive end, or fluidity for an outside linebacker prospect. He is an effective edge rusher, however. He has the explosive first step and low center of gravity to get under and drive much bigger offensive tackles. He bends and closes well. He's relentless so he doesn't have to win with his first move, either.

    How he fits: 

    Houston's coaching staff continues to upgrade the edge of this defense, especially the pass rush. Although Williams is listed as a DE, his best fit in this 3-4 front is as a pass-rushing OLB. He is an upfield guy who is almost one-dimensional. This was a thin position heading into the draft, but the Texans have now added two guys with similar skill sets. They should have a nice four-man edge-rush rotation.
  • What he brings: 

    Franklin is a high character and tough prospect. He takes pride in pass pro and has a lot of versatility in the passing game as receiver. Franklin flashes good pop out of cuts as well. However, he lacks ideal power and must learn to get upfield more quickly as a runner. Franklin will never be able to handle a heavy workload, but can develop into a good No. 2 or No. 3 who can offer a change of pace for Green Bay.

    How he fits: 

    The Packers' coaches continue to rebuild the RB position. Second-round pick Eddie Lacy gives them a bell cow, between-the-tackles back, and Franklin can add a nice change-of-pace aspect to this offense, both as a receiver out the backfield and in pass protection, which is huge. Franklin should give the Packers a nice 1-2 punch at RB, and QB Aaron Rodgers will really welcome Franklin's blitz-pickup ability.
  • What he brings: 

    Gholston has the length, frame and athletic ability teams covet at defensive end. The problem is, those tools don't always show up on film, and concerns about work ethic make you wonder if he will ever realize his considerable potential. He is a stout run defender and effective power rusher off the edge when he is playing at his best.

    How he fits: 

    There was a lot of talent on this D-line last season, but the edge pass rush wasn't as productive as the team would like. DE Michael Bennett is gone, and DE Adrian Clayborn is coming off a season-ending injury. The good news is Da'Quan Bowers seems to no longer have legal problems and should be ready to go, but there isn't a lot of depth behind Clayborn and Bowers. To expect both to have clean and productive years may be overly optimistic. Gholston has all sorts of potential and a chance to be special, but there is no consistency there. At the very least, the Bucs need him to be a developmental, swing DE.
  • What he brings: 

    Goodman has a great frame with extremely long arms. He can anchor against the run and uses his length to lock out and set the edge. However, Goodman must learn to use his hands better to disengage from blocks. He flashes as a pass-rusher but doesn't have ideal first step quickness and needs to develop as a counterpuncher.

    How he fits: 

    The Falcons no longer have star pass-rusher John Abraham, and they really need to improve their edge pass rush. They did bring in Osi Umenyiora from the Giants, and he has the skill set the team needs. But the other projected starter, Kroy Biermann, is not an elite rusher, and they would like to move him around the formation. There is not much depth here, and Goodman appears to be the perfect guy to bring along, but he may be forced to be the No. 3 DE at first.
  • What he brings: 

    Patton is one of the more polished route runners of the entire class. He shows quick feet to gain a clean release, and while he lacks elite top-end speed and burst out of cuts, he does a nice job of working defenders in his stem to gain separation. Patton flashes ability to come down with the tough catch outside of his frame, but he needs to get stronger and show better focus at times both in traffic and battling for contested throws.

    How he fits: 

    Patton looks like a depth selection for a unit that already has several quality players. The 49ers have five productive players with varied skill sets who are all ahead of Patton, and it looks like it will be tough for Patton to get quality snaps. However, we know that this staff likes to roll out a lot of exotic personnel groupings, so if Patton can find a certain niche, it would give him a chance to be a contributor.
  • What he brings: 

    Simon may lack ideal athleticism on tape, but he is a better football player than athlete. He plays with excellent leverage and has heavy hands. Simon is a relentless player on tape and shows great instincts. He can set the edge in run support and has a quick first step as a pass-rusher with the ability to convert speed to power.

    How he fits: 

    Although he's listed as a DE, his best fit on this 3-4 defense is as an OLB edge rusher. He is relentless and adds to a group that already has solid depth and a variety of skill sets. It looks as though, at the very best, he is the Ravens' fifth OLB, although he may be able to help when they go to 4-3 sub packages as a DE with his hand in the dirt. Versatility will help him fit in.
  • What he brings: 

    Juszczyk isn't just a smart player with limited big-play ability, as you might expect from a Harvard prospect. He's a hard-nosed runner who fights for yards after contact and after the catch, and he is an aggressive lead blocker who doesn't back down. He can hold up in pass pro or release when he lines up in the backfield, and he can line up in the slot.

    How he fits: 

    Although this looks like a peculiar selection because the Ravens already have Vontae Leach at FB, Juszczyk has a skill set with a little more versatility. He could potentially contribute in an H-back-type role and adds some versatility to the Ravens' passing game, which already has an intriguing two-TE set. This coaching staff may find some creative ways to use Juszczyk.
  • What he brings: 

    Two consecutive major knee injuries dropped Lattimore into Day 3. However, on tape he is the most talented running back in this class. Lattimore has above-average power and lateral agility, quick feet and acceleration out of his cuts. In addition, he is a patient runner who utilizes his blocks well. Throw in his versatility and natural pass-catching ability, and he is a three-down back if able to fully recover from the latest injury.

    How he fits: 

    At first glance, this doesn't appear to be any kind of need for the 49ers, but Frank Gore is starting to age, Kendall Hunter is coming off an injury and LaMichael James was a non-factor last season. This is the perfect spot for Lattimore, because he can basically redshirt and have a complete year to get healthy with NFL doctors.
  • What he brings: 

    Taylor dominated the week of the East-West Shrine game with his motor and range. He has adequate bend and closing speed, but he doesn't have to get home to make an impact as a pass-rusher. He has the long arms and vertical jump to gets his hands on passes at the line of scrimmage. At 6-foot-7, he plays a little high and can give ground as a run defender, though he is tougher than strong at the point.

    How he fits: 

    The Lions' DE corps has undergone a makeover this offseason. Kyle Vanden Bosch, Cliff Avril and Lawrence Jackson have departed, but the team picked up Jason Jones from Seattle and returns Ronnell Lewis and Willie Young. Now the Lions have Taylor as a developmental edge guy to complement first-round pick Ziggy Ansah. This now gives Detroit five guys at DE, and it looks like the Lions' staff has really fixed this position.
  • What he brings: 

    Toilolo isn't going to run away from many NFL defenders. He doesn't have to, though, because he has the frame and length to make plays in traffic. Stanford took advantage by lining him up out wide in the red zone and throwing up jump balls to him. He's also an above-average inline blocker who gets into position and walls off defenders.

    How he fits: 

    The Falcons need a guy in place to step in for Tony Gonzalez after the 2013 season. The guys they have on the roster are complementary players and not very productive in the passing game for a Matt Ryan-led offense that loves to throw to the tight end. You would think the Falcons would look for an athletic, move guy who can flex and motion, but Toilolo is more of an inline guy with great size. He should have great production in the red zone, catching the high ball similar to Gonzalez. But asking him to make all those athletic catches we've seen from Gonzalez is probably overly optimistic.