Round 4
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    There's some concerns about Givens' size and work ethic, but he has the explosiveness, wiggle and speed teams look for in their slot receivers.

    How he fits: 

    The Rams continue to upgrade the weakest unit in the NFL. Givens gives them some flexibility and can play inside or outside. Sam Bradford will like him because he is a great route runner and he will be in the right place at the right time. This passing game doesn't have a game breaker yet, but they're starting to put together a decent multi-receiver package.

  • What he brings: 

    While a shoulder injury and sub-par pass-protection skills likely hurt Miller, he's a great value at this pick because of his ability to accelerate and break away when he gets the seam.

    How he fits: 

    He will be a good complement to Reggie Bush because he has more size, he can run between the tackles and with power which will allow him to share some snaps. He also has big play capability and explosiveness. He's not great in the passing game, but he doesn't have to be with Bush. He gives them a little more of a chance for a power run game.

  • What he brings: 

    Gradkowski brings good versatility to play both guard and center. He plays with good balance and is always on his feet.

    How he fits: 

    The Ravens are really trying to upgrade the interior of their OL, which was a real weakness a year ago. He can play OG or OC. Left guard is a real problem and OC Matt Birk is likely in his last year.

  • What he brings: 

    Jones is a four-year starter who doesn't excel in any one area, but he's a tough competitor who almost always finds a way to win.

    How he fits: 

    The right side of this OL need to be rebuilt and Jones fits nicely in their zone-blocking system. They did resign OC Chris Meyers, so Jones will probably be a swing guy backing up the OC and OG positions.

  • What he brings: 

    Benjamin is an undersized explosive slot receiver who will never start on the outside, but can also contribute in the return game. He's at his best with the ball in his hands in space.

    How he fits: 

    He's a little bit of a curious pick because he's a like the guys they already have and they're still looking for that dynamic edge guy who can stretch the field. Benjamin could be effective out of the slot, but they have those guys and he could help in the return game, but they already have Joshua Cribbs. He can add some explosiveness to a passing game that had none in 2011.

  • What he brings: 

    If he ever recovers from his two consecutive knee injuries, Bolden can turn into one of the better cornerback prospects in the draft. Great balance, quick feet, anticipation and playmaking ability provide Bolden with great upside.

    How he fits: 

    This is a secondary that struggled in 2011 and there are a lot of questions at the corner position, especially when they're forced to play sub packages. Their need is for a turn-and-run corner and that's what Bolden is if he's healthy.

  • What he brings: 

    Cousins makes up for his average pocket mobility and arm strength with accuracy, sound decisions and leadership. He may never develop into a starter, but he could and should quickly develop into an excellent backup.

    How he fits: 

    At first glance, this looks like a luxury pick because his chances of competing with RG3 are minimal. But Cousins has the instincts and the skills to run Mike Shanahan's offense. He has a chance to run it more effectively early as RG3 learns the offense. He can be an excellent backup and he should be a great quarterback meeting teammate as these two young guys learn the system together.

  • What he brings: 

    Alexander may not be as explosive or close as well as some other defensive end prospects, but he's big, strong and plays every snap with the same sense of urgency. He's also versatile enough to line up at defensive end or outside linebacker, depending on the scheme.

    How he fits: 

    Charles Johnson is the only real edge pass-rusher on this defense, and while they have some young guys with developmental skills, Alexander can give them some production as a hybrid DE/OLB type guy and maybe develop a bit into a sack guy.

  • What he brings: 

    Take away the durability concern and Adams goes a lot earlier than this. He's a shifty, open-field runner with the quick feet and vision to create big plays whenever he gets in space.

    How he fits: 

    We thought that they might address this need earlier to give Steve Smith some help, but they didn't and after Smith, there isn't a lot of explosiveness in this group. Adams is a quick guy that could immediately contribute in the slot and three wide receiver sets and in the return game, where there is an opening.

  • What he brings: 

    He's a run-and-hit linebacker that can develop in terms of instincts and playing with a better pad level at the point of attack.

    How he fits: 

    They are making the transition from a 3-4 to 4-3 defense and that means they will ask their outside linebackers to play with a different skill set. Bradham should fit nicely as an edge player whose strength may be in run support.

  • What he brings: 

    Turbin's a bigger back with good vision, power and nimble feet, especially for a guy his size. While he's not going to contribute much on third downs, he can develop into an excellent reserve and short-yardage back.

    How he fits: 

    He should be a nice complement to Marshawn Lynch, and has a similar skill set. Pete Carroll wants to establish a strong run game, and Turbin can spell Lynch from time to time and take some carries between the tackles.

  • What he brings: 

    Wylie's raw, but he's quick as a hiccup and very dangerous with the ball in his hands, not only after the catch, but in the return game. He'll need polish in terms of developing as a route runner.

    How he fits: 

    Dwayne Bowe is their only explosive player in this group. With Steve Breaston as a complementary guy and former first-round pick Jonathan Baldwin as a disappointment, there is a need for a quality No. 2 guy. But Wylie's production may come out of the slot in a Wes Welker-type role in multi-receiver packages.

  • What he brings: 

    Blake is a wide-bodied center who started for three years at Baylor. He shows great awareness in pass protection and as a run blocker.

    How he fits: 

    They really lack depth at center and we know that Peyton Manning demands a lot out of that position with his pre-snap reads and asking the OC to make blocking calls. Blake will start off probably as a backup, but if he can master the mental aspects, he could become a starter.

  • What he brings: 

    Ta'amu's got exceptional size for a two-gapper, along with a quick first step and a strong anchor. In addition, he displays good endurance for a guy his size, but needs to develop as a pass rusher.

    How he fits: 

    He seems to fit this defense perfectly and he could fill as serious need lining up at NT in a 3-4 defense. K.C. Hampton is near the end with durability issues and backup Chris Hoke has retired. The NT position for Pittsburgh keys their ability versus the run. Ta'amu will be the classic two-gap point of attack guy and very little penetration.

  • What he brings: 

    Green is a tall, lean receiving tight end that can make an immediate impact in the passing game, but needs to get thicker and stronger if he wants to be a three-down player.

    How he fits: 

    The Chargers wanted to upgrade the TE position behind Antonio Gates because of age and durability questions. While Green won't give them much help in the run game, they have guys to do that. He can be a move-type TE to get favorable matchups and QB Philip Rivers loves this type of option in the passing game.

  • What he brings: 

    Rodriguez is an undersized h-back type who catches the ball well and runs hard after the catch. However, he's never going to be a great in-line blocker or much of a big-play threat.

    How he fits: 

    The challenge for the Bears is how to use him properly. FB/TE was a forgotten position under Mike Martz, but Mike Tice will bring it back. The guys they have right now are primarily blockers, which helps the run game, but Rodriguez gives them flexibility as a move guy and outlet receiver. He's also a good second-level blocker. If they're creative, they can get some quality snaps out of him and really help Jay Cutler.

  • What he brings: 

    One of the most talked-about players heading into Day 3, Massie unexpectedly dropped from being a potential first-round pick. If we didn't miss any red flags, then he's a steal at this point in the draft. He has the natural ability to push for a starting job as a rookie.

    How he fits: 

    This was a glaring need for the Cardinals. They have tried to solve the OT weakness for years without much success. They gave up 54 sacks a year and a lot of those came off the edge. Massie is probably a steal at this stage of the draft and he could step in and likely start at right tackle and eventually move LOT if needed. At this stage of the draft, this is an excellent need pick.

  • What he brings: 

    Wilber's greatest attribute is his ability to rush the passer. He's an effective hand fighter with good initial quickness.

    How he fits: 

    The starters at OLB are good, but the depth behind them is not great. Wilber fits perfectly as that 3-4 edge rusher that defensive coordinator Rob Ryan wants. If they hit on him, he could replace Anthony Spencer and give them good production opposite DeMarcus Ware.

  • What he brings: 

    Howard's a disruptive one-gap defender who doesn't anchor very well, but excels at making plays in the backfield.

    How he fits: 

    Pete Carroll puts a premium on press-rush pressure without a lot of blitzes, but they only had 33 sacks a year ago. They are solid on the edge and they have worked in free agency to upgrade the interior and Howard will add depth as a one-gap penetrator. He might fit best in passing downs. He's a bit of a feast-or-famine guy.

  • What he brings: 

    Sensabaugh's still developing in terms of instincts and being firmer in run support. However, he has quick feet and good top-end speed to hold up at man coverage in the next level.

    How he fits: 

    Their best corner, Cortland Finnegan, left in free agency for St. Louis, and their current starters are OK. They have a couple of young guys behind them that are developing slowly and they may be nothing more than backups and special teams guys. Sensabaugh is a good turn-and-run corner, he fits their skill sets and he could immediately contribute in sub packages. They would like for him to be a future starter.

  • What he brings: 

    In addition to his ability to get open and create after the catch, Charles makes up for his marginal size with upper-body strength and aggressiveness as a blocker.

    How he fits: 

    In this Jay Gruden West Coast offense, they would like to upgrade their TE in the passing game. Jermaine Gresham is a solid all-around starter, but Charles gives them a chance for some interesting two-TE sets. He is a guy that can flex or lineup wide. He is underrated on yards after the catch. QB Andy Dalton will probably like him as an outlet receiver.

  • What he brings: 

    Looney possesses massive size and a strong anchor, providing him with excellent point-of-attack skills. He also shows good feet and balance in pass pro.

    How he fits: 

    This is an improving OL that's really growing together, but they lost Adam Snyder at ROG in free agency. Right now, inexperienced Daniel Kilgore is the starter, so Looney has a chance to compete with him for the starting job or be an inside swing guy. His ability to block on the second level will endear him to Harbaugh.

  • What he brings: 

    While you'd like to see more production in the return game from Wright, he's quick enough to separate from coverage and able to produce after the catch. He also catches the ball better than you'd expect from a receiver with smaller hands.

    How he fits: 

    Percy Harvin has been their only explosive playmaker, but their ability to keep him on the field has been a problem. Although they acquired Jerome Simpson from Cincy, his off-the-field issues are well known. The rest of the guys just seem to be complementary players. In a perfect world, they would have move Harvin inside to work out of the slot and take advantage of his quickness, but Wright is probably more suited to play the slot and use that quickness on underneath and intermediate routes.

  • What he brings: 

    Robinson has a great frame and is an above-average athlete with good range and lateral quickness. However, he needs to play with more determination on the field and can be a bit soft-tempered at the point of attack.

    How he fits: 

    In this 3-4 defense he will likely be an ILB and either compete with young Riley Perry or eventually replace their defensive leader London Fletcher, but in all likelihood will start as a swing guy inside. His skill level is solid, but is he tough enough at the point of attack to anchor this defense.

  • What he brings: 

    He's an above-average blend of size and range. He doesn't have the greatest instincts, but he's always around the ball because of his motor and range.

    How he fits: 

    He has played inside and outside, but in this 4-3 defense he will likely be an OLB. Scott Fujita could miss some time and the other starter Chris Gocong is solid, but there is virtually nothing behind them. Johnson at the very least should be a swing guy at this position. He may be asked to contribute earlier than expected.

  • What he brings: 

    Martin's a quick starter that shows good suddenness and explosiveness as a route-runner to create separation. While his hands are a bit inconsistent, he makes up for it with his big-play ability after the catch.

    How he fits: 

    We know that Houston wanted to upgrade their receiving corps and this makes two wide receivers drafted. It seems like they were looking for an outside to stretch the field and take some attention away from Andre Johnson, and that's not what they will likely get from Martin. He can be productive in the slot. He is good at yards after the catch and he might step in as a punt returner. He adds depth at best.

  • What he brings: 

    Toon is a big, physical possession receiver who uses his frame to shield defenders from the ball. But there are concerns are durability and his ability to separate.

    How he fits: 

    At first look, wide receiver doesn't look like a big need, but they did lose Robert Meachem to free agency and Drew Brees could never have too many targets in the passing game. Toon brings a unique skill set because he's big and physical and can give them good possession production and help on third down and in the red zone.

  • What he brings: 

    Boykin is a better athlete than football player at this point, however he has exceptional top-end speed and change-of-direction skills, and brings extra value in the return game.

    How he fits: 

    The reason that they traded Asante Samuel was that he could not play the inside slot corner well not could any of their other guys. Boykin fills that nickel slot role nicely. He could also contribute in the kicking game, possibly as an explosive punt retuner, which could take some pressure off DeSean Jackson in that role.

  • What he brings: 

    Brooks was overshadowed playing in an extremely talented LSU secondary. When you watch him on tape, you see a player with great speed and toughness.

    How he fits: 

    This secondary used to be very productive, but they struggled a year ago and they didn't matchup well versus spread offenses. In the first round, Stephen Gilmore fills their outside need and now Brooks could lineup versus the slot and their nickel and dime packages. He will also be solid versus the run. This is an excellent value pick because he can fill a specific role.

  • What he brings: 

    Lewis has a thick build and exceptional point-of-attack skills. He flashes as a pass rusher with his ability to dial up with power moves. He's still developing in terms of instincts and recognition.

    How he fits: 

    On paper this looks like a deep group and a solid rotation. This is a defense that wants to generate most of their pass rush from their front four with no blitzes. However, Kyle Vandenbosch is 34 years old and Cliff Avril is playing under the franchise tag and if not signed under a long-term deal, could leave in a year and the depth is decent at best. Lewis could be effective as a rotation edge guys especially against the run. This defense had a nine-man DL rotation at times during the 2011 season. If they play some 3-4 fronts, he could move to OLB and they might tinker with the idea of looking at him SAM position in the 4-3.

  • What he brings: 

    Crick has very good initial quickness, both with his feet and hands. While he has just average point-of-attack skills, he brings a lot of upside as a pass rusher.

    How he fits: 

    The two starters in this 3-4 defense, J.J. Watt and Antonio Smith, are really productive and their two backups are good versus the run. That gives them a nice four-man rotation but they seem to be missing that edge guy who can make explosive plays. Crick will likely try to compete for a backup job at DE in the 3-4 and his better value may be moving inside when they play a four-man front in passing situations.

  • What he brings: 

    Robinson could be a steal at this point, due to his combination of size, soft hands and top-end speed. He still needs development in terms of technique and as an in-line blocker, but has the tools to develop in those areas.

    How he fits: 

    Everybody anticipated that the Giants would address this position in the draft because of two key injuries to veterans to Jake Ballard and Travis Beckum. Though they brought in Martellus Bennett from Dallas there is no assurance they will have their guys back from injury in time for training camp. Robinson has an excellent skill set and a chance to develop, but he's not there yet. He won't add a lot in the passing game.

  • What he brings: 

    Ellison isn't much of a big-play threat and he's not a powerful blocker, but he does everything right and hard. One of the reasons he's a good value is he's a great special teams player.

    How he fits: 

    This looks more like a special teams pick than to fill a position need. They signed Jerome Felton as a fullback in free agency. While Ellison could contribute there, he's devastating on cover teams and that could likely be his main role unless they go to more two-back sets. He could develop as a lead blocker for Adrian Peterson. The coaches will likely really be intrigued by his motor and look for ways to get him on the field.

  • What he brings: 

    Burris makes up for his inability to anchor by exploding into blockers. He shows outstanding range in coverage and against the run.

    How he fits: 

    He was likely drafted to fill their biggest needoutside linebacker. They lost their best playmaker Kamerion Wimbley as a salary cap move. With the exception of Aaron Curry, they're just not good enough at the position in terms of consistent plays and depth. Burris could help as an every-down player and especially as an edge pass-rusher.

  • What he brings: 

    Thompson has the ability to contribute both near the box and in the back end in coverage. He's an above-average athlete with good top-end speed, but can improve in terms of instincts.

    How he fits: 

    They lost both backup safeties in free agency and both were also good on special teams. Strong safety Bernard Pollard was basically a run defender and their great free safety Ed Reed still plays at a high level, but he's near the end of his career. Reed has mentored him and he is primarily a box-and-half-field type safety, but his instincts and feel for the game is good. And like the guys they lost, Thompson should help on special teams. This is a pick to watch.

  • What he brings: 

    Mosley could do a better job of sinking his hips and generating power, but he has above-average quickness and lateral mobility for his size. He's more than capable of pushing for early playing time at right tackle.

    How he fits: 

    This is an offensive line that could use help all across the board and especially at the tackle position. Age is really a factor in this unit. Mosley is a developmental guy who likely fits best at ROT and he needs to get a little more physical, but at the very least he should be a swing guy and provide some depth to this group.

  • What he brings: 

    Daniels plays every snap through the whistle, and he has the quick first step to give interior offensive linemen all types of problems. He doesn't have great size, but he has gotten bigger, and he's tough at the point of attack.

    How he fits: 

    Obviously, Green Bay thinks they need to get more physical inside because they drafted two DTs. The question here is where Daniels fits. They don't get a lot of pass-rush production from their DEs, but does Daniels really fit in the 3-4? He is more of a penetrating one-gap guy instead of a two-gap tie-up blocker types and letting the OLB get all the pressure. He's a good football player but how they use him will be critical.

  • What he brings: 

    McMillian's a small-school prospect with good size and above-average range. He also has the hand size to develop into a playmaker in coverage.

    How he fits: 

    Safety is a position of need for the Packers, especially since Nick Collins is gone with a neck injury. Their projected starters and backups are not good enough and they'd probably like to avoid moving Charles Woodson inside, though he can help there in some packages. If McMillian can play well enough to add depth and athleticism to this group and not force their hand with Woodson, it would be a pleasant surprise.

  • What he brings: 

    Childs is a tough, physical receiver who has excellent ball skills and hands. He has the size to win one-on-one downfield battles, but lacks elite suddenness out of breaks.

    How he fits: 

    He actually has a chance to upgrade this group because he is an outside guy with straight-line speed and good ball skills. That gives them more versatility with Percy Harvin, and if he can develop as a No. 2 guy, that would be a real bonus in this passing game.

  • What he brings: 

    Has good size and tested extremely well at his pro day. He's a guy that can play well in the box, and has enough top-end speed to play in the back end.

    How he fits: 

    Brodney Poole was a nice free agent pickup at SS from the Jets, but this safety position just didn't make enough big plays a year ago. Both starters weren't good enough in coverage and the depth was suspect. Johnson is probably a HWS guy that they hope will develop because they could still use a starter inside. He may be a project that makes his mark on special teams early.