Round 3
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Fiedorowicz is a big-bodied Y tight end with the frame and quickness to develop into an effective inline blocker if he learns to keep his pads down more consistently. He's not much of threat after the catch, but he's fast enough to get down the seam and compete for 50-50 balls downfield. While he drops passes he should catch, he has massive hands (10 inches), and he has shown the ability to make tough catches in traffic.

    How he fits: 

    You could see this pick coming as coach Bill O'Brien loves to employ multiple-tight end sets. Fiedorowicz gives the Texans the option to play more two-TE sets, and he can help in the short to intermediate passing game. He's also a powerful blocker in the run game.
  • What he brings: 

    We gave Moses a first-round grade, so obviously we think he's an excellent value at this point. Edge-rushers are going to have a tough time getting around him considering he has 35 5/8-inch arms. He also does a nice job of anchoring and mirroring in pass protection. He can lunge and lean as a run-blocker, but he did a much better job of sustaining and finishing last year than he did in 2012. Finally, he's versatile, as he's got experience at right and left tackle.

    How he fits: 

    Washington has to keep franchise quarterback Robert Griffin III upright and healthy. Finding an upgrade over right tackle Tyler Polumbus, who is entering the final year of his contract, is a step in the right direction. Moses has all the tools to compete for the starting job on day one, and he's an excellent pass-blocker.
  • What he brings: 

    Turner is a developmental prospect who got away with bad habits playing against FCS level competition. He'll have to improve is footwork in pass protection and pad level in the run game to succeed in the NFL, but he has the natural ability to develop into an above-average starter at right tackle. He has good arm length (34 inches) and upper-body strength. He presses blockers off his frame in the run game and can stun edge-rushers with a violent punch. At 6-foot-5 and 315 pounds, he also has good quickness and athletic ability.

    How he fits: 

    The Dolphins lost four of five starters from the offensive line amid the Richie Incognito fiasco. They did a nice job of filling the left tackle spot by signing Branden Albert in free agency and now look to Turner to fill the right tackle spot. Turner is a thick individual who should upgrade the run game immediately while he develops his technique in pass protection.
  • What he brings: 

    Southward is a bit raw and is a better athlete than football player at this point. However, he is an explosive athlete who has the versatility to drop down in the slot and match up in man coverage. Southward has a very high ceiling to turn into a quality starter and heavy special-teams contributor if he can continue to develop in terms of instincts.

    How he fits: 

    William Moore is firmly entrenched as the starter at strong safety, but the Falcons don't have much in the back end after that. Southward fits nicely at free safety and also has some experience at corner. His athletic ability is off the charts, he has solid range and can cover. He is just starting to scratch the surface of his potential. Atlanta plays a lot of sub packages, which will allow Southward to sit back and play a solid center field.
  • What he brings: 

    Sims is one of the more versatile running backs in this class. He has above-average lateral quickness and burst out of his cuts. He lacks ideal power and can run with better pad level as an inside runner. However, he brings added value in the passing game and is one of the more natural pass-catching running backs in this year's crop.

    How he fits: 

    With Doug Martin dealing with durability issues, Sims adds depth. He will likely be used in heavy third-down situations, where he can use his versatility in the passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Martin is a versatile interior offensive lineman with experience at both guard and center. He is a powerful individual who gets quality movement as a run defender and constantly looks to finish. He also is light on his feet and has a jarring punch in pass protection. He still has some work to do in terms of playing with better balance, but he should develop into a quality starter sooner than later.

    How he fits: 

    By drafting Carlos Hyde in the second round and now taking Martin in the third, the 49ers continue to make sure they stay ahead of the curve with their power run game. Martin provides instant depth on the interior with the versatility to line up at guard and center. He has great size and strong inline power base to get movement, which is an ideal fit for the 49ers' rushing attack.
  • What he brings: 

    Kirksey is an excellent space player with above-average range and change-of-direction skills. He shows strong instincts and is a very reliable tackler in space. In addition, he is one of the better cover linebackers in this class with athleticism and awareness. He also brings added value as special-teams contributor.

    How he fits: 

    This defense switches fronts constantly, although we see it use a lot of 3-4. Kirksey is not really a rush linebacker, but he is good in space and in coverage. He should contribute in sub packages, especially in the Browns' 4-2-5 nickel looks. Kirksley should also help early on special teams.
  • What he brings: 

    Crichton doesn't have great flexibility or closing speed coming off the edge, but he is a relentless pass-rusher who uses his hands well and doesn't have to win with his first move to get to the quarterback. He's also a tone-setting run defender who plays with good leverage and sets the edge.

    How he fits: 

    Crichton is a powerful run defender who will likely line up at left defensive end. The name of his game is power and high energy. Because he can anchor versus the run, his physicality will be welcomed by coach Mike Zimmer.
  • What he brings: 

    Brown is an inside thumper who packs strong power at the point of attack. He lacks ideal range but has strong instincts as an interior run-stopper. He has adequate range in underneath zone coverage but lacks ideal playmaking ability and will struggle in man coverage.

    How he fits: 

    This is a 4-3 defense with some wide-nine schemes that asks its linebackers to play close to the line of scrimmage to attack the gaps. Brown is a physical thumper who fits what the Bills want to do defensively, but he's probably only a two-down, run-support guy.
  • What he brings; 

    Bromley flashes above-average quickness and agility on the interior to cause disruption as an upfield penetrator. He also plays extremely hard and flashes as pass-rusher. He will need to continue to get stronger at the point of attack.

    How he fits: 

    The Giants continue to add depth along the defensive line, which is needed. Cullen Jenkins and Mike Patterson are getting long in the tooth and the jury is still out on Johnathan Hankins. Bromley should provide interior disruption with his quickness and agility.
  • What he brings: 

    Mason has an strong combination of quickness and lateral agility. He also is an instinctive runner who maximizes his yards and does a nice job of getting vertical. He brings added versatility as a pass-catcher but must continue to develop in pass protection.

    How he fits: 

    The Rams continue to surround QB Sam Bradford with weapons. After finding a steal in Zac Stacy in the fifth round last year, general manager Les Snead adds depth at running back with Mason.
  • What he brings: 

    Much like Colorado State's Weston Richburg, Swanson is a four-year starter and two-time team captain with good length (33 1/8 inches) for the position. He's not as balanced as Richburg and has a tougher time staying in front of defenders, but he shows good awareness and rarely gets caught out of position in pass protection. He's also an adequate positional blocker who gets into position and walls off defenders.

    How he fits: 

    Swanson is a position guy who plays well in space, which should help him thrive in Detroit's zone-blocking scheme. He's not a mauler, but efficient and excellent in blitz pickup -- an area in which the Lions need to improve. Their starting line is in place, but Swanson offers quality depth across the interior of the O-line as the Lions look to keep QB Matthew Stafford upright.
  • What he brings: 

    Borland lacks ideal size, length and athleticism but is a better football player than athlete. He has tremendous instincts and a nose for the football. He plays with a great motor and constantly made plays on tape. He reminds us a lot of former Miami LB Zach Thomas.

    How he fits: 

    With NaVorro Bowman coming off a serious ACL injury, Borland provides San Francisco with a nice replacement in the middle of its defense. Like Bowman, Borland is a three-down player with excellent instincts and pass-rush skills. He is a Zach Thomas type who gives the 49ers an insurance policy as Bowman recovers.
  • What he brings: 

    Long is coming off a season-ending knee injury, raising concerns about his durability, and he can get knocked off balance in pass protection, making this a reach. He does have a prototypical frame for a guard prospect, though, and he's an effective positional blocker who can wall off his assignments long enough to create a seam for the ball carrier.

    How he fits: 

    Washington wants to become more physical inside, and Long is a decent blocker who should fit perfectly in this zone scheme. A player like Long can significantly upgrade Washington's rushing attack.
  • What he brings: 

    Brooks went unheralded and was the quarterback of the Florida State secondary that led the nation in interceptions. He has strong eyes and instincts in coverage and has above-average range. In addition, he brings adequate ball skills and provides added value as a blitzer. Brooks should step in and develop into a starter at free safety in a hurry.

    How he fits: 

    Matt Elam, a 2013 first-round pick, filled the strong safety role, but the Ravens had a need for a playmaking free safety. Brooks fills that role with instincts, range and a physical element. Baltimore now has a young, talented safety tandem that can grow together.
  • What he brings: 

    McDougle sustained a season-ending shoulder injury in the fourth game of last season, and he flew under the radar during the postseason draft process. He has average size, and he'll have a tough time matching up with bigger receivers, but he's an instinctive cover corner with above-average balance and ball skills. His intangibles are also outstanding. Maryland created the Dexter McDougle Ultimate Team Player Award in his honor this year.

    How he fits: 

    With Antonio Cromartie signing with Arizona, 2013 first-round pick Dee Milliner coming off a disappointing rookie season and 2010 first-round pick Kyle Wilson continuing disappoint, the Jets are in desperate need for help at corner. McDougle has the smarts to quickly pick up the Jets' defensive scheme and the competitive nature to push for early playing time.
  • What he brings: 

    Jackson masks his athletic limitations in pass protection with width and length, as his arm length (33 3/4 inches) and 336-pound frame make it tough to get around him. He's at his best driving defenders off the ball in the run game, and he can swallow up smaller defensive tackles.

    How he fits: 

    After losing three starters from last year, the Raiders look to add depth on the interior offensive line. Jackson is a road-grader who instantly upgrades Oakland's power run game, which should take some pressure off QB Matt Schaub (or Derek Carr).
  • What he brings: 

    Sutton carried too much weight last year, and it showed on his tape and at the Senior Bowl. He looked sluggish and struggled to finish, but he showed much better quickness on his 2012 film. If he can keep the weight down and regain his form, he can be a disruptive run-stopper and effective pass-rusher who makes it tough for quarterbacks to step up in the pocket.

    How he fits: 

    After having a league low in sacks in 2013, the Bears continue to address their defensive front line with pass-rushing help. When in shape and playing with quality leverage, Sutton provides the quick hands and feet to provide interior disruption as a pass-rusher.
  • What he brings: 

    Concerns about his excessive social media involvement and long-term dedication to the game, as well as a knee injury that required season-ending surgery, likely caused Nix's stock to drop. He is an outstanding interior run-stuffer, and while he's never going to be a high-volume sack player, he can push the pocket when he's healthy.

    How he fits: 

    Houston continues to bolster its defensive front and gets excellent value by taking Nix here. The Texans did a nice job of signing free-agent nose tackle Jerrell Powe, who is familiar with defensive coordinator Romeo Crennel, but ideally he's providing depth, not starting. Nix is capable of supplanting him on the depth chart.
  • What he brings: 

    At 6-foot-6 and 272 pounds with 35-inch arms, Martin certainly looks the part, and he tested off the charts at the combine. He was also highly productive last year. The problem is he doesn't make the impact on tape you'd expect from a player with his skill set. He plays too high as a run-defender and marginal competition inflated his sack production.

    How he fits: 

    While this is a base 3-4 defense, Arizona plays a lot of 4-3 fronts -- especially in nickel situations. Martin's best fit is as a 4-3 end. He is not a prototypical 3-4 edge-rusher, but he should be productive at LDE. Arizona boasts a solid defensive line, and Martin adds depth to the rotation.
  • What he brings: 

    Thornton has a starter's skill set. He has a quick first step along with outstanding raw power and good lateral agility. He has some off-the-field character issues and can be inconsistent. However, if he rights the ship, he has a chance to bring outstanding return in the third round.

    How he fits: 

    Despite being big and physical on the interior, the Packers' defense hasn't been able to generate much inside pressure of late. Thornton is a one-gap penetrator who plays with intensity and features nice pass-rush moves. He could provide the Packers with a nice inside push.
  • What he brings: 

    Huff is a smooth athlete with above-average top-end speed to develop into a vertical big-play threat. However, he must continue to get stronger and develop as a route runner.

    How he fits: 

    Philadelphia coach Chip Kelly is very familiar with Huff, who was a former player for Kelly at Oregon. Huff is a bit raw as a route runner but has intriguing quickness and top-end speed. Most importantly, he flashes the ability to create after the catch, which is a critical element in the Eagles' offense.
  • What he brings: 

    Gaines comes with some baggage, as he was suspended for the 2013 season opener, and he's had some problems staying healthy. He needs to bulk up to improve his durability and ability to defend the run as well. He's still a good value because he has the instincts, speed and ball skills to develop into a playmaker.

    How he fits: 

    Gaines has above-average size, length and athleticism combo to fit well within defensive coordinator Bob Sutton's press man scheme. He provides excellent depth behind Brandon Flowers and Sean Smith. The Chiefs now have one of the bigger and more physical cornerback units in the league.
  • What he brings: 

    Clarke must continue to develop strength, but he is an underrated athlete with length and explosiveness. He does a nice job of using his long arms to lock out setting the edge and plays with strong motor and toughness. He also flashes quick hands to counter as a pass-rusher.

    How he fits: 

    Clarke provides depth to a Bengals DE corps that suffered a big loss with Michael Johnson going to Tampa Bay via free agency. He has the ideal length and athleticism that the Bengals covet at the position. The Bengals already have adequate depth at the position, which will allow Clarke to continue to develop his frame and get stronger. He fits well as a left DE within Cincinnati's base 4-3 scheme.
  • What he brings: 

    The biggest concern when it comes to Watt is his ability to hold up against NFL interior pass-rushers. He has active hands and fights to stay in front of defenders, but he has shorter arms and average lateral mobility. He's a better run-blocker. He flashes the ability to generate push as a drive blocker, and he can cover up defenders in a zone scheme.

    How he fits: 

    San Diego's zone-blocking scheme fits Watt very well. While he's not a great athlete, he is a tough guy -- just what the Chargers' line has been missing. San Diego will be much better up front as Watt adds depth at guard.
  • What he brings: 

    Moncrief is a physical specimen. At 6-foot-2 and 221 pounds, he ran a 4.40 40 and recorded a 39 1/2-inch vertical at the combine. The reason he lasted this long is he's not a natural pass-catcher and hasn't come close to realizing his awesome potential at this point.

    How he fits: 

    Indy's passing game has some major question marks heading into the 2014 season. Reggie Wayne is great, but age and durability are legit concerns and Hakeem Nicks is an unknown behind outstanding No. 1 T.Y. Hilton. Moncrief, a big target with "sneaky" vertical speed, could help elevate the passing attack. Along with Hilton, Moncrief will stretch the field for Andrew Luck and open up the field for the other receivers.
  • What he brings: 

    Brown is undersized but has an explosive speed and quickness combination. He runs polished routes, is highly competitive and brings added value as a special-teams returner. His game reminds us a lot of Steelers WR Antonio Brown.

    How he fits: 

    Brown has to step in at slot WR after the Cardinals lost Andre Roberts in free agency. Arizona likes deep crossing routes, bunch fronts and multi-personnel groupings, and Brown can work the middle of the field and get good separation. Brown is a smart guy who can fill several roles, including being a return specialist, despite his thin frame.
  • What he brings: 

    Turner has a wide base and strong inline power as interior run-blocker. He has a powerful punch and can steer defenders off the ball. He has a prototypical anchor in pass protection but needs to show more patience in his sets. Ideal guard for a power run game.

    How he fits: 

    Turner is more of a power player on an offensive line that uses a zone-blocking scheme. He might not have the athletic ability to be a perfect fit, but his toughness and willingness to battle every down will be a welcome addition in Carolina.
  • What he brings: 

    Linder might not have the length to protect the edge at the NFL level, but he's a smart and versatile player who's willing and capable of playing any position along the offensive line. He masks his athletic limitations in pass protection with hand placement and effort. He drives his legs and flashes the ability to generate push in the run game.

    How he fits: 

    Jacksonville's O-line is a mess, yielding 50 sacks in 2013, and it will take some time to fix it. Linder is a good start. He is a smart guy who can play all five positions across the front, giving the Jags the liberty to plug him in early in his career.
  • What he brings: 

    West has good size and runs with strong power and balance. He shows adequate lateral agility but lacks ideal juice. He is a grinding-type runner who can shoulder a heavy workload.

    How he fits: 

    This was a curious pick because Ben Tate is the starter and there are several others in the mix to back him up. But West fits as a developmental inside runner in Cleveland's zone-blocking scheme. You can see some Alfred Morris in him, and West could be a guy the Browns are patient with as they groom him for a larger role.
  • What he brings: 

    Schofield isn't as athletic and doesn't play with as much of an edge as his college teammate and first-round pick, Taylor Lewan. He is a three-year starter with the potential to develop into a starting right tackle or possibly kick inside to guard. He gets good hand placement and anchors well in pass protection, in addition to getting into sound initial position and showing adequate power as a run-blocker.

    How he fits: 

    The Broncos need a right tackle after moving Orlando Franklin to guard, and Schofield is a good fit for offensive coordinator Adam Gase's scheme. He has the power base to develop into an effective drive blocker, and he's an adequate pass-blocker with above-average awareness.
  • What he brings: 

    McKinnon is an explosive athlete with above-average size. He is a tough projection, coming from Georgia Southern's triple-option offense. However, he showed adequate vision, quality balance and agility while showing a quick burst out of cuts. He was one of the big winners at this year's combine.

    How he fits: 

    McKinnon comes from an option-heavy offense and he lacks ideal size, but his ability to make defenders miss, along with his burst, makes him a very intriguing change-of-pace back behind Adrian Peterson. He offers versatility, giving Norv Turner the option to use him in different formations all across the field. The Vikings will likely design a series of plays to best utilize his skill set.
  • What he brings: 

    Archer is an undersized back with strong versatility in the passing game and as a returner. He has rare speed and a explosive burst, making him extremely dangerous as a home run hitter when catching the open field.

    How he fits: 

    Archer is listed as a running back, but he could line up all over the field for the Steelers. His ability to split out and catch the ball (think Dexter McCluster) will help him be productive in several packages. He's a home run threat whenever he gets the ball in his hands -- something Pittsburgh's offense has been missing since Mike Wallace's departure.
  • What he brings: 

    While he can cover up defenders in space and has the size to develop in this area, Rodgers frequently lined up in the slot at Cal and he's not an effective inline blocker at this point. He doesn't have the speed to stretch the field and isn't much of a threat after the catch, making him a substantial reach at this point in the draft.

    How he fits: 

    This is an insurance pick for the Packers due to Jermichael Finley's injury concerns and adequate play from Andrew Quarless. Rodgers is a developmental guy who is not a finished product but has some skills and is very competitive.
  • What he brings: 

    Gilmore has average athleticism and enough top-end speed to stretch the middle of the field. He has a wide catching radius and big hands. He must continue to develop strength as an inline blocker but works to sustain blocks.

    How he fits: 

    He has a chance to develop into an inline tight end who can be asked to edge block or play as a decent short-area receiver. He gives the Ravens some physicality that will allow Dennis Pitta and Owen Daniels to concentrate on the passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas has some durability concerns. If not for a recent ACL injury, he probably would have been off the board a lot earlier. He has long arms and adequate lateral agility in pass protection. While Thomas needs to play with more consistent pad level, he has above-average inline power to steer defenders off the ball in the run game.

    How he fits: 

    This is a value pick for the 49ers, who are set along the offensive line and can afford to use a redshirt season on Thomas, who's coming off a torn ACL. If Thomas is able to fully recover, he will bring great value here with the power, length and versatility to interchange between tackle and guard. He fits in well with the physical style of the 49ers' offensive line.

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