Round 3
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Kelce is an underrated prospect and is one of the better athletes in the tight end class. He can separate and create after the catch but could improve his strength and technique as a blocker. Still, he has a chance to be a difference-maker as a pass-catcher

    How he fits: 

    This looks like another value pick, rather than a need, as the Chiefs already have Tony Moeaki and incoming free agent Anthony Fasano. When you look at this offense, the Chiefs probably have a low-level need for a No. 3 tight end who can give them production in the passing game. Kelce will likely be a move player who will flex and line up wide to get good matchups. It looks as if new coach Andy Reid wants to use more multi-tight-end sets than he did in Philadelphia, and the addition of Kelce gives them a lot of flexibility in the short passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Gratz is quick but not extremely fluid, which sometimes leads to separation at the top of the stem. He is able to recover, but he is not great in terms of instincts when playing in off coverage. He is effective in press coverage, though, with the length to reroute receivers and the speed to run with them downfield.

    How he fits: 

    The Jaguars' top four defensive backs from a year ago are all gone, although they have added cornerback Alan Bell from Houston as an unrestricted free agent. The combination of an inconsistent pass rush and lack of turn-and-run corners spells trouble. They will probably play a lot of man-under Cover 2 schemes in the secondary, and that should suit Gratz well, as he can almost squat and not be forced to turn and run a lot.
  • What he brings: 

    Warford lacks elite athleticism and foot quickness, but he is a mauler on the inside and has enough short-area agility and inline power to open holes when locked up in a phone booth. He is exactly what you're looking for in a guard in terms of size, mass and strength.

    How he fits: 

    This offensive line was very stable a year ago, but three of its veteran starters are now gone, which has robbed Detroit of its depth. The Lions like a couple of their young players, but they just need more bodies. Ironically, Warford is more of a mauler in the run game instead of a finesse player in pass protection -- and that's not what the Lions do. But he does add depth.
  • What he brings: 

    Moore's run fits and take-on skills are not ideal at this point, but his range and ability to chase down backs are impressive. His value is that he is the best 4-3 linebacker in this class on third down. As a pass-rusher, he can bend the edge and also find seams between the tackles. He is a playmaker who can hold up in man or zone coverage.

    How he fits: 

    Outside linebacker hasn't been perceived as a critical need, but this is another value pick. Moore fits perfectly in the 4-3. The Raiders have two new free-agent starters at outside linebacker. They also like young Miles Burris, but they might move him inside. Moore is a productive player with good athletic ability who can contend for a starting job, or at the very least add depth.
  • What he brings: 

    Logan has a low center of gravity and the power base to hold his ground one-on-one in the phone booth. He uses his hands well to lock out and get off blocks. He is not a massive space-eater, though, and has a long way to go in terms of contributing as a pass-rusher.

    How he fits: 

    Under new coordinator Billy Davis, this is a unique 4-3 under defense. Pre-snap, it might look like a 3-4, but the right outside linebacker will walk up, and that provides a four-man pass rush. The Eagles have gotten good production out of defensive end Fletcher Cox, and they added former 49ers nose tackle Isaac Sopoaga in free agency, so Logan will most likely fit as an end in the 3-4 look.
  • What he brings: 

    He lacks ideal size and speed, but he is quick, has above-average short-area burst to close quickly, and does a good job timing leaps to make up for his lack of size. McFadden is an ideal sub-package contributor as a nickelback.

    How he fits: 

    This secondary has one shutdown corner, Joe Haden, on the left side, and they like Buster Skrine at right corner, although he's small and not always disciplined. They also brought in veteran Chris Owens from Atlanta. The Browns must decide if they want to play McFadden outside with Skrine over the slot, or if they want to do the opposite. But they will ask McFadden to play a lot of tight man-to-man coverage without help.
  • What he brings: 

    Mathieu is one of the most critiqued prospects in this class due to his off-field issues. And while he lacks ideal size and speed, he is one of the best natural football players in this class. He has knack for finding the ball and manufacturing turnovers and big plays. In addition, he excels when lined up near the slot, where he maneuvers through traffic well and is an excellent tackler in space. He also provides special-teams value, both as a returner and on cover units.

    How he fits: 

    This was a good defense a year ago, and the philosophy won't change a lot, even with a new coaching staff. The Cardinals have one elite, shutdown corner in Patrick Peterson, who can take the other team's best receiver out of the game. They added Antoine Cason from San Diego and Jerraud Powers from Indianapolis in free agency. Those three are outside cover players, which should allow Mathieu to play over the slot and contribute in sub packages. In addition, he should be outstanding on special teams, both in coverage and as an electrifying returner. Can you imagine having Mathieu and Peterson as your returners? For all of Mathieu's baggage, if anybody can keep him in line and on the right track, it's Peterson, his mentor and former LSU teammate.
  • What he brings: 

    Wreh-Wilson has a nice combination of size, top-end speed and fluidity. He is a physical corner who excels in press coverage when using his hands to disrupt a receiver's release, and he's as good in run support. The only knock is his lack of ball production for a corner his size.

    How he fits: 

    Starting corners Jason McCourty and Alterraun Verner are decent players, although they gave up more than their share of big plays. Cody Sensabaugh, who was a rookie in 2012, is developing behind them as a nickel guy, but there's not a lot of depth on the edges. As the Titans transition to more man-to-man schemes than they played a year ago, Wreh-Wilson fits nicely as a potential swing corner on the edge who can play press coverage.
  • What he brings: 

    McDonald is a better athlete than football player at this point. He shows above-average movement skills and an adequate closing burst. In addition, he brings a physical presence down the middle of the field. However, he lacks ideal instincts and shows some inconsistency as a tackler and needs to clean up his angles.

    How he fits: 

    This secondary gave up a lot of big plays between the hashes, and both starting safeties from 2012 are gone. While the Rams seemed to like projected starter Darian Stewart, the coaches may be cooling on him. That opens up the opportunity for McDonald to be an immediate starter at either safety position.
  • What he brings: 

    Winters lacks ideal athleticism but makes up for it with a wide and massive frame. In addition, he has an ideal power base and enough short-area quickness to get into position and open up running lanes in the run game. Winters also is light on his feet in pass sets to shuffle and mirror inside and can sink and anchor to hold up against power moves.

    How he fits: 

    Two-fifths of this offensive line, center Nick Mangold and left tackle D'Brickashaw Ferguson, are solid. But after that, there's not a lot of depth or talent. Both starting guards from last season are gone, and guard Willie Colon, signed in free agency from Pittsburgh, has a history of injury problems. So Winters has a real shot to start on opening day and solidify the interior of this offensive line.
  • What he brings: 

    Glennon is a natural thrower who can make all the throws, and has one of the best deep balls in this class. And he moves well in the pocket fairly well for his size, and does a great job keeping his eyes downfield when eluding the rush. He will miss some easy throws a times, and also needs to show more competitiveness as a leader and develop the ability to shake off mistakes.

    How he fits: 

    This pick would certainly suggest that this coaching staff may not fully believe in Josh Freeman as the long-term answer at quarterback. Freeman continues to have inconsistent streaks and make bad decisions, and Glennon has a good enough skill set to potentially develop into a good player. He will likely start as Freeman's backup, which would give him a year of development. But you get the feeling that this coaching staff could push him into the mix quicker than we might think if Freeman's production remains inconsistent.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams is a limited short-to-intermediate route-runner who will have problems separating from underneath man coverage, unless he improves the way he sets up his breaks. He could also become more consistent with his hands. He's a good value, though, because he can take the top off coverages. He is a long strider who tracks the deep ball well, and is also athletic enough to come down with jump balls.

    How he fits: 

    Wide receivers Dez Bryant and Miles Austin are solid starters. Bryant, especially, has a chance to develop into a real star. But there's not a lot of depth, as backups Dwayne Harris and Cole Beasley are young developmental players. Williams is an outside guy with some vertical abilities who could team with Bryant to provide more big plays. At the least, Williams should be a quality No. 3 contributor.
  • What he brings: 

    Armstead is a small-school prospect who nailed the pre-draft process. He had a dominating performance at the East-West game and was invited to the Senior Bowl, where he looked like be belonged with the big boys. He has left tackle feet and lateral agility, but needs to improve technique in his pass sets. Armstead isn't a dominating run blocker, but gets into position to cover up defenders and open up creases.

    How he fits: 

    The Saints lost left tackle Jermon Bushrod in free agency, and they have replaced him with oft-injured Charles Brown. But he may not be the long-term answer. They also tried four players at right tackle last season with marginal success. Obviously, the Saints aren't overly happy with their tackle situation. Armstead will likely get a shot to win the left tackle job, and if not, compete on the right side or at the very least be a swing contributor.
  • What he brings: 

    Allen fell into the third round due to a lingering knee injury and not running well at his pro day. However, he is a physical and polished route-runner, which makes up for his lack of ideal suddenness and burst out of breaks. Allen also shows above-average body control and strong hands, and is underrated after the catch. Throw in his intelligence and toughness to work the middle of the field, as well as line up outside the hashes, and Allen brings great value at this point.

    How he fits 

    The Chargers love young Danario Alexander, veteran Malcom Floyd is a solid contributor, and Vincent Brown should come back solid from injury. However, the veteran free-agent duo of Eddie Royal and Robert Meachem from a year ago never really panned out. That opens the way for Allen as a sound edge receiver who can help in sub packages and give San Diego depth. Allen's instincts should be good enough to give quarterback Philip Rivers enough confidence in him to get him the ball.
  • What he brings: 

    Thomas has the versatility to line up at tackle and at guard. While he lacks an ideal inline power base, he makes up for it with quickness and lateral agility, making him an ideal fit for a zone blocking scheme. In addition, he is polished in terms of technique and has excellent hand placement. Thomas also is consistent in space when climbing to the second level or covering up defenders on the move.

    How he fits: 

    Although the Dolphins continue to try to replace left tackle Jake Long, they also have problems inside at the guard position. They fixed one with the acquisition of right guard Lance Louis from Chicago. But the weak link of this unit is probably left guard Richie Incognito. That gives Thomas a chance to compete for a starting position, and at the very least be a swing inside player.
  • What he brings: 

    Goodwin is an undersized slot receiver who can run away from pursuit after the catch and flashes the ability to get behind the coverage. He is a raw route-runner whose footwork needs work, and his small hands (8.5 Inches) likely played a role in some passes he dropped. Even if he doesn't play a big role on offense, he is capable of pushing for playing time as a return man where his speed, vision and burst make him a big-play threat.

    How he fits: 

    With elite Stevie Johnson, promising T.J. Graham and exciting second-round pick Robert Woods on the outside, this is a perfect fit for Goodwin as an inside receiver working mostly out of the slot. He's neither big nor physical, but he has world-class speed, and he will be a nightmare matchup for any defense's No. 3 corner. He also should be able to help in the return game. This passing game should be dramatically improved as the EJ Manuel era starts.
  • What he brings: 

    Wheaton is a track star whose game is based on speed and the ability to stretch the field vertically. He is smooth as a vertical route-runner, and has an extra gear and ability to track the ball downfield. However, he needs to continue to get stronger and shows some tightness as an underneath route-runner. Wheaton doesn't have great elusiveness after the catch but has the speed to hit a home run if catching a seam.
  • What he brings: 

    Wilcox played receiver and running back before moving to safety in 2012, so he's still picking up the nuances of the position. It's also somewhat surprising that he doesn't play the ball better considering his experience on offense, though that could improve as he gets better at reading quarterbacks and receivers. However, he has the blend of size, speed and fluidity to play safety at the NFL level if he continues to improve. Even though he isn't a fundamentally sound tackler, he's not afraid to step up and he flashes some pop.

    How he fits: 

    The safety position gave up a ton of big plays a year ago, and they were horrible against tight ends -- especially down the seams. The Cowboys added Will Allen in free agency, but they are also making a philosophical switch from man-to-man schemes to Cover 2 on the back end. So they hope that Wilcox can develop into a good half-field safety.
  • What he brings: 

    At one point, Moore projected as a first-round pick. His stock has steadily dropped because of a poor workout, concerns about his work ethic and inconsistency setting the edge against the run. His timed top-end speed is somewhat misleading. He plays much faster and he's shown that he can get after the quarterback on tape. He is quick off the ball when he times the snap well and he flashes the ability to translate to speed to power. While there are concerns about his effort against the run, he is relentless chasing the quarterback.

    How he fits: 

    This has been one of the deepest units in the NFL in recent years -- especially at defensive end. The Giants aren't getting quite the same production as they have in the past, although they do get a boost by the projected move of Mathias Kiwanuka back to defensive end from outside linebacker. That gives them Justin Tuck and Jason Pierre-Paul as the starters and Adewale Ojomo as a young developmental player. Moore is a good edge rusher who will give the Giants a nice quartet and the ability to continue to run the NASCAR rush package that they love.
  • What he brings: 

    Jenkins is at his best against the run and he's a prototypical nose tackle regardless of the front. He is virtually impossible to move off the ball with one man, and he can hold his ground when he keeps his pads down. There's also a lot to like his athletic ability and effort for his size. The downside is that he doesn't offer much as a pass rusher and chances are he's a career two-down player.

    How he fits: 

    As the Saints make the transition from a 4-3 to a 3-4 defense under Rob Ryan, they're going to need more physical players on the defensive line. Right now, they don?t have them. Jenkins is a massive player who can eat up a lot of space and could fill in nicely at nose tackle, as most of the other inside players on this line are better suited as ends than tackles.
  • What he brings: 

    The knock on Ryan is his lack of fluidity and top-end speed in man coverage. However, he is an instinctive player with above-average eyes and discipline in coverage. Ryan also has underrated ball skills and does a great job of maintaining position when playing the ball. He also is one of the most effective tacklers in run support in this year's cornerback class. Throw in his big-time contributions on special teams as a non-returner and Ryan brings solid value at this point.

    How he fits: 

    Re-signing Aqib Talib was a huge positive for this secondary, although they caught a break when Alfonso Dennard resolved his legal issues. Kyle Arrington is best as the No. 3 inside guy in their nickel package, and Ras-I Dowling can't stay healthy. The Pats love to play a lot of sub packages with three corners and two safeties, and that gives Ryan -- who?s a very instinctive and reliable player -- a chance to contribute in many ways.
  • What he brings: 

    Shorter arms, smaller hands and four career interceptions all raise concerns about his ability to develop into a playmaker at the next level. He'll also have a hard time matching up with taller tight ends in man coverage, but he has the speed and enough fluidity to match up with some slot receivers at the next level. His greatest strength is defending the run. He's aggressive, he takes sound angles for the most part, and he wraps up well.

    How he fits: 

    For years, this defense has been able to mask deficiencies on the back end because of a solid pass rush up front. But last season that wasn't the case. The safeties were exposed in man-to-man cover packages, and the Bengals just don't have anybody who can be a difference-maker or give them needed production. Williams has excellent athletic ability and a skill set in coverage, and he's physical against the run. He has a chance to contribute early in this secondary, although he could struggle against physical tight ends in coverage.
  • What he brings: 

    Reed lacks ideal size to be a traditional Y tight end, and won't provide much as a blocker. However, he has a natural feel as a route-runner and pass catcher to move around formations to create mismatches. Reed doesn't have elite speed, but he sets up his breaks well and shows above-average body control and hands catching the ball. In addition, he is shifty after the catch and shows good vision in the open field to pick up yards.

    How he fits: 

    Although starter Fred Davis was coming off an Achilles injury, the Redskins made a good move re-signing him. Davis is a productive player in the passing game. However, his backup, Logan Paulsen, is more of a blocking tight end and doesn't give them much as a receiver in two-tight-end sets. Reed is strictly a move-type tight end who can flex in motion, which can open up this offense nicely when the Redskins want to play with two tight ends.
  • What he brings: 

    Thornton has gotten into trouble off the field so there are character concerns to consider here.In terms of the film, his ability to adjust to the speed and the complexity of the defenses is the biggest concern, based on below average awareness on tape. His natural ability isn't an issue. He shows above-average quickness and balance for a 320-pound interior offensive linemen, and he's even shown the ability to line up at tackle.

    How he fits: 

    This offensive line wasn't consistent last season, especially in pass protection. That's not good when you have a franchise quarterback. The Colts are making the transition to a bigger, more physical line, and they tried to address some of their weaknesses in free agency. Thornton is the physical kind of guy they want as an inside mauler, and he has played both guard and tackle, which provides versatility. Indy's coaches will look for the best spot to fit him in.
  • What he brings: 

    Hill lacks ideal size and has just an average anchor. However, he provides quickness to be disruptive as a one-gap defender and brings upside as a pass rusher in heavy passing situations as a reserve player.

    How he fits: 

    One of last year's starters, Alan Branch, is gone. Brandon Mebane remains as a solid run defender, and defensive end Fred Bryant can move down inside, if necessary. But after that, there's not a lot at the position. They also signed free agent Tony McDaniel from Miami. Hill gives the Seahawks a bit of a unique skill set, with penetrating athleticism and good movement skills. But he isn't overly physical, which means his early contributions will be in sub packages.
  • What he brings: 

    Lemonier has a prototypical 3-4 OLB build. He plays with a great motor and is relentless as a pass rusher, and flashes an explosive first step and ability to bend and shave the edge. However, he must continue to improve his strength both as a counter-puncher and setting the edge in run support.

    How he fits: 

    In the 49ers' base 3-4 scheme he probably fits best as an OLB rush guy, in an Aldon Smth-type role. Lemonier is quick off the edge, good in space, and gives them some insurance for Smith, whose production seemed to slip late in the 2012 season. The Niners never sacrifice athleticism.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams has an ideal frame and is exactly what you want your right tackle to look like. He plays with an edge in the run game, with the ability to get movement at the point of attack, and he looks to finish. Williams lacks ideal lateral agility in pass pro, though, and can struggle when having to recover against quicker and more explosive rushers.

    How he fits: 

    As good as this offensive line has been, they have struggled on the right side, using a four-man rotation at times at guard and tackle. And they seem to like the potential of youngsters Brandon Brooks and Ben Jones, but in an offense that has a powerful right-handed run game with zone-blocking principles, they need productive guys and Williams will have a chance to compete at the ROT spot if he can zone block.
  • What he brings: 

    Webster has ideal size and flashes an above-average skill set in man coverage. He has quick feet, transitions well out of cuts and has a noticeable closing burst on tape. In addition, he is one of the better run defenders in this cornerback class. Williams' only knock is lack of elite instincts, but he brings good value at this point with the ability to play outside as well as bump inside at the nickelback position.

    How he fits: 

    Champ Bailey is near the end of a Hall of Fame career, but the Broncos did bring in Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie in free agency, which will likely move Chris Harris to the nickel spot. The need to add youth and depth, though, to upgrade the secondary in their aggressive man-to-man packages. Webster has a chance to develop for a year, and if he is good enough he could eventually move into either starting slot, because the Broncos will likely need two corners in the near future.
  • What he brings: 

    Harmon has an underrated skill set. He is a natural football player who shows above-average range and almost always is in proper position. In addition, Harmon shows above-average diagnostic skills and brings a physical presence in run support.

    How he fits: 

    The safety spot has been a revolving door for the Patriots in recent years, but the addition of SS Adrian Wilson in free agency should add a physical dimension, and he will complement FS Devin McCourty well. They use a variety of personnel packages, often with multiple safeties, and Harmon's versatility and ability to play both zone and man gives him a chance to contribute in sub packages.
  • What he brings: 

    Bailey doesn't have the same big-play ability as former college running mate Tavon Austin, but he is a polished route-runner who can separate from underneath man coverage, and excels at finding pockets working against zone looks. He also catches the ball well and flashes the ability to make a defender or two miss after the catch.

    How he fits: 

    It's obvious QB Sam Bradford needed more weapons, and he now has them. Although they lost WR Danny Amendola and Brandon Gibson, Chris Givens gives them a vertical threat and some big-play capability, along with Austin Pettis. And with new WR Tavon Austin in the slot, Bailey can give them another guy outside and a dramatic sub-package upgrade in the pass game, especially when you add free-agent TE Jared Cook to the mix.
  • What he brings: 

    Davis shows quick feet and flashes playmaking instincts. However, he can be overaggressive and will gamble, and lacks the elite instincts to recover when caught out of position. Davis can also struggle to turn and locate the ball when caught in trail position. However, he has upside with his athleticism and instincts, and can potentially add depth to a secondary.

    How he fits: 

    This was not a good cover group a year ago, and they lost solid veterans in Bryan McCann and Shawn Smith, but they did pick up an elite CB in free agency in Brent Grimes. By adding two corners already, they have a better chance to play their aggressive man-to-man schemes. That allows them to blitz and take more chances, and they can now put a pretty good sub package on the field, which is a must against spread offenses like New England's.
  • What he brings: 

    Williams is a massive interior defensive tackle that has surprising agility for his size. He is versatile and can line up in multiple positions along the front line. Williams quietly had a strong week at the Senior Bowl against better competition. In addition, he flashes pass rushing capabilities on the interior and notched 27 sacks in his career.

    How he fits: 

    While this defensive line has an elite player in DT Haloti Ngata, and an ascending guy in Arthur Jones, they need more versatility inside, although they did sign a couple of free agents. Williams can play on the nose in the 3-4, and could replace Terrence Cody, but he can also play DT in the 4-3 alignments. He will give them a little inside penetration they need. This defense has always been built from the inside out, and that's why this pick makes a lot of sense.
  • What he brings: 

    Montgomery isn't the most savvy pass rusher, but he shows excellent speed to power and has the quick hands to develop a variety of moves. He's better against the run at this point. He locks out and presses tight ends and tackles inside when setting the edge. There's also a lot to like about his ability to close and chase without losing backside contain.

    How he fits: 

    The key to Houston's defense has always been the edge pass rush, and they really like to have depth at OLB. They lost Conner Barwin in free agency, and they expect Whitney Mercilus to fill his role opposite Brooks Reed. That puts Montgomery in a position to be a swing OLB and certainly a bigger factor if Mercilus does not make the expected progress.
  • What he brings: 

    There's no denying Davis has an elite combination of size and speed for the position. However, while he had flashes at times in 2012, he had a laundry list of injuries and did not appear to have the same type of lateral quickness and explosiveness out of cuts he showed before dislocating his ankle in 2011. Davis also has had ball security issues and must learn the value of protecting the football, or could find an early exit from the league.

    How he fits: 

    This is obviously a run-oriented offense with Jamaal Charles who has recovered nicely from an ACL injury, but there is little depth at the position. Davis has a chance to be a solid backup, but a real key for him will be holding up in pass protection and pick up the blitz if he wants to stay on the field, but he has an interesting skill set.
  • What he brings: 

    Gooden is one of the more explosive linebackers in this class in terms of height, weight and speed. He has excellent range and closes in a hurry. Gooden can also factor as a blitzer and shows great range in coverage. However, he must improve in terms of instincts and playing with better discipline to maximize his potential at the next level.

    How he fits: 

    Starters Akeem Ayers and Zach Brown are decent, but the coaches are talking about moving Ayers into more of a DE role as an edge pass-rusher, at least in their nickel packages. Add to that the fact that there's not a lot of depth, and Gooden has a chance to be at least a swing OLB and a guy who could contribute when and if Ayers moves down with his hand in the dirt.

SPONSORED HEADLINES