Round 2
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    The top-ranked guard on Scouts Inc.'s board, Su'a-Filo is an above-average run-blocker who can steer defenders and drive them off the line once in position. While he has starting experience at left tackle, he has just average arm length and showed just average awareness in pass protection, so there are concerns about his ability to protect the edge in the NFL. That said, he has the balance and strength to hold up on an island at guard, where he's capable of being a starter from day one.

    How he fits: 

    He is a power player with an excellent motor and might fit best inside at guard. Houston's offensive line is making the transition from a zone-blocking scheme to man, which fits his aggressive style. This has been a good line for years, but it showed some inconsistency last season. This coaching staff wants power and toughness, and he will fit that bill.
  • What he brings: 

    Lawrence has been suspended multiple times, raising concerns about his maturity and discipline. He can also do a better job of keeping his pads down and getting stronger at the point. The reason he's a good second-round value is his ability to get after the quarterback. He has above-average initial quickness and shows good torso flexibility bending the edge. He doesn't have to win with speed, either. He can generate speed to power, and he has the quick hands to keep offensive tackles off his frame when offensive tackles take away the edge.

    How he fits: 

    This is a need pick for a defense that desperately craves a pass rush. Both starting ends (Anthony Spencer and George Selvie) are less than ideal. The Cowboys have a deep-seven philosophy, and that needs pass-rush pressure to come from the defensive ends. Dallas used 19 different players on the defensive line a season ago, and it had to blitz to create pressure -- something it wants to avoid doing. Lawrence will start as a backup end but could step in and contribute early.
  • What he brings: 

    Bitonio is as versatile as it gets, considering he can play any position along the offensive line, including left tackle. He has adequate arm length (33 7/8") and the quick kick step to take away the edge, as well as the balance to mirror when defensive ends shoot or redirect inside. He's a relentless run-blocker with enough athletic ability to cover up defenders in a zone scheme and enough power to generate push as a drive blocker when he keeps his pads down, though he's inconsistent in this area. He also shows above-average awareness as a run-blocker and in pass protection.

    How he fits: 

    He has good versatility and can play both inside and outside. He could fill in at RT or line up at either guard position. While the Browns have shown both man- and zone-blocking schemes a year ago, we will likely see a lot of zone looks in the run game -- and Bitonio has been a very effective zone blocker. The coaches want a little more physicality up front, especially inside, and he will give that to this offense. He actually may have the versatility to line up at all five OL positions.
  • What he brings: 

    Carr can get the ball from Point A to Point B in a hurry, thanks to his quick release and outstanding arm strength. He's also an accurate short-to-intermediate passer when he's in rhythm and his production at Fresno State was outstanding. He's still a reach this early in the draft, though, and the reason is he doesn't handle pressure. He shows below-average poise and frequently fails to follow through with defenders in his face. In addition, his completion percentage has been inflated by the high percentage of passes he threw within 5 yards of the line of scrimmage.

    How he fits: 

    This was a need pick for an offense that has a bridge guy in Matt Schaub, but Oakland's QB position has been a revolving door for years and it needs to solve it soon. Carr fits nicely in the West Coast offense, using short-to-intermediate passes with the ball coming out quickly, leading to YAC. He has enough athletic ability to bootleg and roll out and his big arm fits those vertical shots the Raiders like to take. The coaches want better sight adjustments and he should be able to do that well. Will he sit for one year and then step in? We'll see.
  • What he brings: 

    From a shear physical standpoint, Hageman might be the most talented defensive tackle in this class. He has long frame and flashes explosive quickness and power to his game. When playing with proper pad level and his motor is running on high, Hageman shows spurts of dominance. However, Hageman comes with bust factor due to some off-the-field character and inconsistent effort on tape.

    How he fits: 

    This is an inconsistent defensive line that has talked about moving to a 3-4 look. But the Falcons will likely remain in a 4-3 front this year. Hageman will line up at DT, and when they shift to a 3-4, he can line up at DE. He could also fit nicely in their 3-3-5 packages when they have their DTs on the field. He is an explosive one-gap penetrator, and that is something needed on this defense.
  • What he brings: 

    Seferian-Jenkins has exceptional size and athleticism. He can stretch the deep middle seams and possesses a wide catching radius. Seferian-Jenkins is also one of the better run-blocking TEs in this class. He comes with some character and effort baggage and will need to grow up quickly to maximize his potential.

    How he fits: 

    Three of the Bucs' TEs wound up on IR in 2013, and they just didn't get a lot of production out of the position. He is physical enough to help them in edge-blocking in the run game, which they really want, and he will give them a big red zone target. This offense will look, at times, like the scheme that we see in Philadelphia. Expect O-coordinator Jeff Tedford to be very creative in terms of using Seferian-Jenkins.
  • What he brings: 

    According to Greg Peshek's wide receiver metrics, Lee had the worst drop percentage (12.3) of the top nine receivers in this class, and he missed three games with a knee injury last year. Plus, he didn't run quite as well as expected. So it's easy to see why his stock has dropped since this time last year. That said, he's a very good value at this point, especially considering Scouts Inc.'s top four receivers are all off the board. Lee is a fluid route runner who changes directions quickly without losing much momentum and accelerates out of cuts. He can also produce after the catch and stretch the field. Plus, he caught the ball far better his first two seasons at Southern Cal.

    How he fits: 

    The Jaguars had to be ecstatic that Lee was still on the board. WR Justin Blackmon has been a disaster off the field, while Cecil Shorts is entering a contract year and has been plagued with durability issues. The other receivers are just complementary players, so the Jags are in trouble when forced into multi-receiver packages. Lee is quicker than fast and will fit nicely in this short passing game that will feature crossing routes and slants.
  • What he brings: 

    Van Noy isn't elite in any one area, but he has above-average instincts and brings a lot of versatility. He must continue to get stronger against the run but uses his hands well to shed and has a knack for coming up with big plays.

    How he fits: 

    He has a chance to challenge ROLB Ashlee Palmer opposite solid starter DeAndre Levy. Van Noy is a versatile guy who should fit nicely in this 4-3 defense. He is sold in all areas but not elite. While he will be asked to play the run and also drop into coverage, this coaching staff wants more blitzes/pressure from their LBs. He isn't exciting, but he's solid.
  • What he brings: 

    Joyner lacks an ideal size and speed combination, but he is one of the better pure football players in this class. He has exceptional playmaking instincts and has had a knack for making big plays at critical moments. He also has strong versatility to line up at CB, safety and slide inside to the slot.

    How he fits: 

    Joyner will likely pair with SS T.J. McDonald and could be a starter from day one. He reminds you of Arizona's Tyrann Mathieu. He might be small but he's a playmaker -- mainly working out of the slot -- and always seems to be around the football. This defense gave up too many passing yards in 2013, but it will continue to be aggressive with blitzes, which means Joyner will be on an island in coverage at times. He will solidify the back end of this unit.
  • What he brings: 

    Matthews is a big-bodied receiver who has long arms, big hands and above-average body control. In addition, he is fearless working the middle of the field and is underrated after the catch. Matthews has some tightness and might struggle at times to consistently create separation, but makes up for it by using his big frame to shield defenders from the ball.

    How he fits: 

    The go-to guys in this pass offense will be Riley Cooper and Jeremy Maclin. But neither guy is an elite receiver in a Chip Kelly offense that loves to spread the field and utilize several of multi-receiver sets. The pace of this passing game is fast and sophisticated, and it requires smart receivers. Matthews fits that description. He will work the middle of the field in this passing game, should produce good YAC numbers and might be used in some bubble screens. Matthews is a solid fit in this offense but not overly flashy.
  • What he brings: 

    Richburg plays with the kind of intensity and has the football IQ you'd expect from a two-time team captain and four-year starter. He's not an overpowering drive blocker, but he gets into position, locks on and keeps moving his feet once in position. While he's on the lighter side and can give some ground in pass protection, he's tough to beat with quickness and he mirrors well.

    How he fits: 

    The Giants struggled inside on the offensive line a year ago, and they could use an upgrade at guard. He is an excellent zone-blocker with good athletic ability but only adequate power. The Giants run a man-blocking scheme but want to be more physical up front. Richburg probably won't be physical enough to help at guard as a rookie, so his best shot might be at center. He can develop into a steady and reliable performer -- one this line desperately needs.
  • What he brings: 

    Koundjio projected as an early first-round pick at one point and has that kind of natural ability. His arm length is exceptional (35 5/8 inches), and he has the big hands (10 1/4 inches) to lock into his assignment's frame. He's also got the foot speed to reach linebackers at the second level as a run-blocker and redirect in pass protection. However, he's an unfinished product who hasn't realized upside at this point. His footwork is inconsistent in pass protection, and he's a waist-bender who leans and slips off too many run blocks.

    How he fits: 

    Buffalo's offensive line allowed 48 sacks a year ago. Although Kouandjio played left tackle in college, he probably fits best on the right side -- where the Bills needed an upgrade opposite solid left tackle Cordy Glenn. Kouandjio's skill set is terrific, but he can get sloppy in his mechanics. His upside is great, and the Bills will love him if he plays hard every week. He fits in their power run game but can also get to the second level when they spread the field.
  • What he brings: 

    Richardson is a smooth athlete who has one of the best sets of separation skills in terms of speed and quickness. However, he has very slight frame and must continue to get stronger in traffic. In addition, he is up and down with his ball skills. While he can make a spectacular catch, he also has far too many drops on routine catches he should make.

    How he fits: 

    This addresses a position of need for a roster that doesn't have many holes. Seattle has several candidates at WR, but with the exception of Percy Harvin, none of them are considered elite. He is not big or physical, but his separation and vertical skills give him a chance to contribute. And in an offense that sees Russell Wilson scramble a lot, Richardson is excellent at adjusting his route to help out his QB. He will be a nice fit in this smart offense.
  • What he brings: 

    Tuitt has an ideal size, length and power combination and has some impressive flash plays. However, he played heavy last year and it showed with his inconsistency on tape. Tuitt must learn to play with better pad level and give a more consistent effort. That said, he has a strong set of physical tools and could end up being one of the bigger steals if able to put everything together at the next level.

    How he fits: 

    Tuitt will likely replace Brett Keisel at the 5-technique and add size and strength to bolster the front line. With the emergence of DE Cam Heyward in his third year and the selection of ILB Ryan Shazier (1st round) and Tuitt, the Steelers are taking steps in strengthening their front seven.
  • What he brings: 

    Murphy is a reach considering he has limited upside as a pass-rusher and below-average range against the run. He is, however, country strong setting the edge. He can press offensive tackles inside, and though he needs to be a little more consistent in this area, he can shed the block in time to make the play. He's also a powerful pass-rusher with an above-average motor.

    How he fits: 

    Murphy is a head-scratcher, as the Redskins have much greater needs at offensive tackle and safety. He is a hybrid defensive end/outside linebacker who will most likely play defensive end in defensive coordinator Jim Haslett's multiple-front hybrid scheme. At 6-foot-5 and 251 pounds, he doesn't have ideal size, but he's strong enough to hold up when asked to two-gap and he has enough quickness to be effective when Haslett one-gaps.
  • What he brings: 

    Jernigan is a wide-bodied one-technique who possesses quick hands, plays with quality leverage and shows above-average range as a run-defender. He is still developing as a pass-rusher, and although he has a strong work ethic, he does come with some minor character baggage.

    How he fits: 

    Jernigan is tough, physical and can fill a lot of holes in this hybrid defensive front. He can play tackle in the 4-3 and end or even NT in the 3-4. He might be asked to replace Arthur Jones, who departed during free agency. He is not a real two-gap power guy, but his one-gap penetration skills will mesh nicely with this scheme. The Ravens like guys who can play a variety of roles; Jernigan certainly falls into that category.
  • What he brings: 

    Amaro frequently lined up in the slot at Texas Tech, and he's not as strong a blocker as his 265-pound frame would suggest, though he's capable of improving in that area. He is capable of making an immediate impact in the passing game, as he separates well and he's productive after the catch. He also has the frame and enough top-end speed to make plays down the seam.

    How he fits: 

    The Jets desperately needed to add weapons in the passing game. They added WR Eric Decker in free agency and added another target in Amaro who is one of the better receiving targets in this TE class. Amaro has limited experience as an inline blocker and needs development in this area. However, he is a definite upgrade in the passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Attaochu lacks ideal size but is a flexible and explosive athlete who brings a lot of upside as an edge-rusher. He bends the edge well and finishes strong at the top of his rush, converting speed to power. He is a still developing in terms of instincts, but he plays with great effort and adds value on special teams.

    How he fits: 

    The Chargers needed to bolster their pass rush off the edge and Attaochu should bring immediate help. He is a versatile edge defender who can play standing up or with his hand in the dirt. This is a solid pick considering Dwight Freeney is in the final year of his contract and Jarrett Johnson has a $7.5 million cap number in 2015.
  • What he brings: 

    Ferguson has ideal size, length and power. He is a better run-stopper than pass-rusher at this point. However, he comes with some risk, as his motor can run hot and cold and he doesn't always play with great pad level.

    How he fits: 

    The Bears' run defense couldn't stop anybody in 2013, and the gap discipline was atrocious. Chicago just didn't have enough size and physicality inside of its 4-3 defense. With his size and toughness, Ferguson should improve the interior run defense, although he will not add much as a pass-rusher. They prefer to rush four with limited blitzes, so Ferguson should be a nice fit.
  • What he brings: 

    Nicklas isn't going to make many big plays whether it's stretching the field or producing after the catch, and he doesn't have the burst to regularly separate from NFL linebackers. That doesn't mean he can't contribute as a receiver. He has the wide frame and strength to box out defenders, and he has above-average ball skills. He also has the size, power and tenacity to develop into an excellent in-linebacker who can create seams in the run game and help out in pass protection.

    How he fits: 

    Arizona has six tight ends on the roster, but a lot of them are small. Coach Bruce Arians prefers big tight ends who that can help out in the run game and in pass protection, making Niklas a perfect fit. In addition, Rob Housler and John Carlson have had problems staying healthy.
  • What he brings: 

    Adams has above-average size and flashes polished routes. He has a little bit of tightness and shows average explosiveness out of cuts. However, he possesses excellent body control adjusting to the ball in the air and has strong hands. In addition, he is sneaky elusive after the catch.

    How he fits: 

    The Packers look to replace James Jones, who left in free agency. Adams is a quality route runner who has great awareness to fit within the Mike McCarthy passing game that relies on rhythm and timing. This selection also makes sense from a standpoint that both Jordy Nelson's and Randall Cobb's contracts expire at the end of the 2014 season.
  • What he brings: 

    Sankey has the lateral burst to make defenders miss in the hole, bounce outside after starting inside and shake defenders in space. He masks his below-average power with balance and effort. He has the burst to get outside and speed to break long runs when he gets a seam. While he needs to get stronger in pass protection, he has good hands and can produce after the catch. He also does a good job of securing and protecting the football.

    How he fits: 

    Sankey has the skill set to come in and potentially be an instant starter. The Titans are clearly looking to bolster their run game; they've addressed the offensive line the past two years and have now taken one of the better running backs in this year's class. This is an effort to take some pressure off Jake Locker and help his development.
  • What he brings: 

    Hill has ideal size and runs behind his pads with natural power. He can be a nightmare when reaching the open field and has quality lateral agility for a 230-pound back. He needs to learn to get more north and south as a runner and comes with some off-the-field baggage.

    How he fits: 

    This might not have been a need, but the Bengals are looking for more production out of their big backs. Current starter BenJarvus Green-Ellis isn't very explosive and Giovani Bernard is more of a scatback. Hill is explosive and runs hard. This coaching staff wants more of a physical running game under new offensive coordinator Hue Jackson. Hall might be able to fill that role.
  • What he brings: 

    Latimer is one of the more underrated receivers in this class. He shows great field awareness and has a natural feel for the position. Lattimore has above-average size and uses his big frame well. He has one of the better sets of hands and reminds us a lot of Hakeem Nicks when he was coming out of North Carolina.

    How he fits: 

    The Broncos helped replace the loss of Eric Decker by signing Emmanuel Sanders in free agency. However, with Wes Welker and Demaryius Thomas set to be free agents in the 2015, adding Latimer makes sense. He has excellent awareness reading coverages on the run and reliable hands to fit perfectly working with Peyton Manning within Denver's passing game, which relies on timing.
  • What he brings: 

    Hyde is Scouts Inc.'s top running back and the closest thing to a complete back in this class. At 230 pounds, he has a nice combination of lateral agility and burst out of cuts. Hyde also runs hard with excellent power and brings quality versatility as a pass-catcher for his size.

    How he fits: 

    Running back isn't a pressing need but it's a need for the 49ers. Former second-round pick LaMichael James hasn't panned out and might not be on the roster on opening day. Frank Gore is about to turn 31, and Kendall Hunter is entering the final year of his contract. Hyde is the top back on Scouts Inc.'s board and an excellent value here. He has the size to handle a heavy workload in the 49ers' run-heavy offense and help keep quarterback Colin Kaepernick upright in pass protection.
  • What he brings: 

    At 6-foot-2 1/2, Jean-Baptiste doesn't have great top-end speed, but he is a big corner with the strength and length (32 3/8-inch arms) to reroute receivers at the line of scrimmage and muscle them out of routes downfield. He's a former receiver who plays the ball well and can make plays in coverage. He can also step up and help out in run support.

    How he fits: 

    Jean-Baptiste has drawn comparisons to Seattle All-Pro Richard Sherman. He was a receiver in the past and has position flexibility, able to play corner or safety. In this Rob Ryan defense, Jean-Baptiste will be a physical press corner. He can play close to the line of scrimmage and challenge receivers, something Ryan will love. His ability to cover without help and reroute receivers will allow this defense to blitz and be aggressive. While he is not a finished product, there is major upside here.
  • What he brings: 

    Mewhort has average athleticism but makes up for it with toughness and great technique. He is a strong hand-fighter who gets quality placement and sustains when able to get into position. He lacks ideal lateral agility, though, and will constantly need to rely on great footwork and proper technique.

    How he fits: 

    Mewhort is a power guy with limited athletic ability. While he can play right tackle, he's probably best fit inside at guard, where the Colts are most vulnerable. The coaches want a better push from their O-line, and Mewhort can give them that. He also fits in their power man-blocking scheme, allowing them to get away from their finesse style of past years. He is what this unit wants to involve into.
  • What he brings: 

    Ealy is a versatile pass-rusher who is at his best working inside as a 3-technique and using his quickness and agility. He is a bit finesse defending the run and needs to play with better pad level in this area.

    How he fits: 

    This is pure value pick late in the second round. The Panthers continue to add talent along the defensive line, which isn't surprising considering general manager Dave Gettleman's background with the Giants. Ealy brings his most value as a versatile pass-rusher who can move all over the front line to create matchup problems. It also makes sense considering DE Greg Hardy was franchised this year and will likely draw a big payday in 2015.
  • What he brings: 

    Robinson is a little bit of a reach, as he is a raw route runner who doesn't have the second gear to get behind the coverage or outrun pursuit after the catch. However, he's a big target who has the competitiveness, frame and leaping ability to win 50-50 balls. He also has the fluidity to improve as a route runner.

    How he fits: 

    After adding Marquise Lee early in the second round, the Jaguars continue to add young targets for QB Blake Bortles (third overall pick) to grow with. Lee relies on agility and speed, while Robinson is a big and physical route runner who can win when contested, provides ability after the catch and can be a legit red zone threat for the Jaguars.
  • What he brings: 

    Garappolo is a bit raw but has an above-average skill set to be developed. He has quick feet and smooth release. In addition, he has the mobility to extend plays with his feet. He must continue to develop his pocket presence, but he has good mental aptitude with which to work.

    How he fits: 

    With Tom Brady still producing at a high level and a still-developing Ryan Mallett on the roster, another QB wasn't a need for New England. But this pick was all about selecting the best available athlete, and Bill Belichick & Co. love to groom young QBs as future trade bait. Garoppolo has solid physical tools and can make every throw. He is a quick study and should be able to master the sophisticated scheme of this unit. He gives the Pats a lot of versatility to make moves and be flexible at quarterback.
  • What he brings: 

    Landry is a better football player than athlete. He lacks an ideal speed and quickness combo but is a fearless working the middle of the field and has a great feel for the position. He plays with great effort and has one of the better sets of hands in this class. Landry does the little things right and compares to former Steelers WR Hines Ward.

    How he fits: 

    The Dolphins are set on the outside with Mike Wallace and Brian Hartline. By drafting Landry, they now provide QB Ryan Tannehill with a reliable slot receiver who has the toughness and natural feel to thrive in the middle of the field. Landry is also an underrated run-blocker who gives great effort sustaining blocks, which should help the run game grow in Miami.
  • What he brings: 

    Britt is a big-time reach here. He's a below-average pass blocker who gives too much ground to speed to power, doesn't have the length to protect the edge against NFL speed rushers and doesn't mirror all that well. He'll likely have to move inside to guard as a result. He is a better run-blocker who gets into position and generates good initial surge, but he doesn't press defenders, and he slips off too many blocks because of it.

    How he fits: 

    The departure of Breno Giacomini via free agency created an opening at right tackle. Michael Bowie, the 2013 seventh-round pick, started seven games last year and could win the starting job, but bringing in competition makes sense. The Seahawks could also look to upgrade over left guard James Carpenter and right guard J.R. Sweezy, which is why taking Britt makes sense. He played tackle at Missouri and could push Bowie for playing time, or he could kick inside and push for playing time there.

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