Round 2
PICK(OVR)PLAYER/SCHOOLPOSDRAFTED BYNOTES
  • What he brings: 

    Cyprien might have the best combination of size, range and athleticism in the safety class. He can play near the box and handle middle-of-the-field responsibilities. Cyprien plays fast, and with a physical edge. His instincts are adequate, but he could improve his angles as a tackle.

    How he fits: 

    This might not have been a crucial need, but the Jaguars have solidified the interior of their secondary. They lost Dawan Landry in free agency, and they like Chris Prosinski to replace him, but he has limited experience. With them playing a lot of man-under Cover 2 looks in the secondary, they need safeties with a lot of range. He should compete immediately for the starting strong safety spot. At the very worst it gives the Jaguars flexibility in their sub packages.
  • What he brings: 

    It's important that Hunter add some weight to his frame and get stronger, otherwise physical corners will push him around a bit. A torn ACL in 2011 also raises a red flag. However, he's still a good value at this point because of his ability to stretch the field. In addition to his speed, he has the height, length and body control to consistently win 50-50 balls. There are concerns about his overall toughness, but he could develop into an impact player.

    How he fits: 

    When everything is right, the Titans have a decent trio of receivers with Kenny Britt, Kendall Wright and Nate Washington. But Britt is continuously in and out of trouble, and the other two haven't established themselves as difference-makers. This offense needs a big, physical receiver who can produce on third down, and Hunter fits perfectly. This is a feast-or-famine position for Tennessee. It could have a strong quartet, or it could become a mess. This passing game goes vertical more than you might think, and Hunter's deep speed could really open things up.
  • What he brings: 

    Ertz is a prototypical 'F' tight end, meaning his biggest impact will be made in the passing game. His ability to line up all over the formation makes it easier to create favorable matchups. He is an above-average route runner with the quickness and athleticism to separate working out of the slot, and he has the speed to work the seam from the in-line position. The trade-off is that he is just an average positional blocker, and might never be more than that.

    How he fits: 

    In this new Chip Kelly offense, there is a demand for a lot of varied personnel groupings and multi-tight end sets. Starter Brent Celek might be getting close to the end, and the other tight ends on this roster aren't big threats in the passing game. The Eagles will use Ertz as a matchup guy in motion and even flex him outside, and he will constantly be on the move. New offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur is a huge advocate of using the tight end position, so we will likely see Ertz and Celek on the field together a lot.
  • What he brings: 

    Slay has an above-average combination of size, feet and top-end speed. He can hold up on an island in man coverage, and flashes the ability to manufacture turnovers in pass defense. However, Slay is a juco transfer with limited experience, and he is still raw in terms of instincts and will lose position at times as a result.

    How he fits: 

    The Lions' pass defense has been a mess for as long as we can remember. They had 10 different starting combinations in the secondary last season. They give up a ridiculous amount of big passing plays, and they haven't addressed the corner position enough in recent drafts. Chris Houston is a decent veteran starter, but young Bill Bentley is scheduled to be the other starter, and he's totally unproven. Slay will get every chance to start at right corner and move Bentley to nickel corner.
  • What he brings: 

    Bernard has average size and top-end speed, and is one of the most versatile running backs in this class. He can contribute in the passing game and as a returner. His vision and instincts are outstanding as a runner, and Bernard's quick feet and lateral agility allow him to get into and out of traffic at the line of scrimmage. There are concerns about his lack of elite size and speed, along with durability issues, and you have to wonder if he can shoulder a heavy workload.

    How he fits: 

    With veteran BenJarvus Green-Ellis as Cincinnati's primary ball carrier, there's not a lot of explosion or big plays in this running game, which is mostly between the tackles. The Bengals got virtually no production out of the passing game with their backs. They lost Brian Leonard in free agency, and backup Bernard Scott only signed a one-year deal. So Bernard, while not a physical grinder, can give the Bengals good production on third down in the passing game. He can also be a nice change-of-pace back from Green-Ellis. With the addition of tight end Tyler Eifert and Bernard, the short- to intermediate-passing game has really improved. That should open things up for A.J. Green of vertical routes.
  • What he brings: 

    At this point, the off-field issues begin to fade and it's all about what Te'o can do as a player. He has some limitations in coverage, lacking the speed and fluidity to consistently match up in man coverage. There is a lot to like about his positioning, instincts and ball skills in underneath zone, though. As a run defender, he must improve his ability to take on and shed blocks, and become a more consistent tackler. Overall, though, his instincts set him apart because he locates the ball quickly enough to beat blockers to the point, and has more range than some faster linebackers because he gets started more quickly.

    How he fits: 

    In this 3-4 defense, the Chargers have one solid starter in Donald Butler, but veteran starter Takeo Spikes is gone. His replacement, Jonas Mouton, is unproven. In all likelihood, Te'o will be given every chance to start at left inside linebacker. But there has to be a concern about how he fits into this scheme. He certainly seems to fit better as a 4-3 middle linebacker or even a 4-3 outside linebacker, although he played in more 3-4 looks than you might think at Notre Dame -- so maybe this isn't as big of a stretch as it might appear. The biggest question will be whether he can hold up when taking on blocks if his defensive linemen don't protect him. But for an inside linebacker, he should be able to stay on the field all three downs.
  • What he brings: 

    Smith doesn't have an elite skill set and still has some developing to do. In particular, his footwork and mechanics need work, which will help improve his intermediate-to-deep accuracy, which is inconsistent at times. However, he is a fierce competitor who can become dangerously efficient when he catches a rhythm. And while he is a pocket passer first and foremost, he has the athleticism to turn a negative into a positive when the play breaks down. He won't turn around the franchise immediately, but if handled the right way Smith could turn into a solid starter.

    How he fits: 

    It's really not a surprise that this position has been a mess, and it looks as if the Jets have decided to break up this group and start over. Mark Sanchez will probably have one more year -- maybe as the starter -- but with a coaching staff that has a short leash. Smith might be pushed to play earlier than expected. He fits new coordinator Marty Mornhinweg's West Coast philosophy with a lot of intermediate crossing routes, screen plays and occasional deep shots. Whoever the starting quarterback is, he will be expected to reduce mistakes and play better assignment-oriented football.
  • What he brings: 

    Carradine has an ideal frame, good length and natural strength and power. He plays with leverage setting the edge against the run, and is relentless as a pass-rusher. He will be most effective when turned loose to find the ball, where he can use his high motor to cause disruption. Carradine doesn't have ideal instincts, but he has upside to become an impact pass-rusher if he's coached up properly.

    How he fits: 

    Until this offseason, the edge of this defensive line was a position of strength. But age and durability could be issues with defensive ends Justin Smith and Ray McDonald, and San Francisco's best pass-rusher, Aldon Smith, needs a physical player next to him to eat up blockers. This is a versatile defense that can show a variety of 3-4 and 4-3 looks, and it will likely utilize Carradine as an edge pass-rusher -- either with his hand on the ground or coming off the edge in a two-point stance, depending on the scheme. This coaching staff loves versatility out of its pass-rushers.
  • What he brings: 

    He was overshadowed last season by Marqise Lee and isn't the same kind of elite playmaker, but Woods is an above-average route runner who can separate from coverage and pick up yards after the catch. He can stretch the field in the right situations, and he will work the middle of the field. There are questions about his work ethic, but there is no doubt about his toughness.

    How he fits: 

    This seems to be a perfect fit with a blend of talent and need. The only consistent producer in this passing game has been Stevie Johnson, and the Bills have gotten virtually no big plays or explosiveness out of their other receivers, which leads to too many double-teams for Johnson. T.J. Graham, a rookie in 2012, is scheduled to be a starter, but he isn't a proven commodity and Woods has a chance to be a quality No. 2 on the edge. That will allow the Bills to possibly move Graham inside. This will give EJ Manuel a much better chance for a legitimate passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Watson is a former basketball player with outstanding feet and lateral agility. He also has long arms, and can shuffle and mirror to stay in front of pass-rushers when he gets good initial position. He lacks an ideal inline power base, though, and doesn't get much movement when locked on to defenders in the run game. In addition, he has just two years of football experience and will need some time to develop his instincts and awareness.

    How he fits: 

    While this offensive line has really struggled for the past couple years, it looked like guard might have been a bigger need than tackle. Both starting tackles, Jared Veldheer and Khalif Barnes, are decent players, but the depth behind them is virtually nonexistent. This group has really struggled with blocking schemes, as the Raiders have gone back and forth between man and zone looks. Now they've settled on a power, man-blocking look, and that might not fit Watson's skills perfectly. He's a little more of a space player -- not necessarily a road grader. But it does give Oakland a nice, three-tackle rotation.
  • What he brings: 

    Banks has great size and can get physical and re-route receivers at the line of scrimmage. He also plays the ball aggressively, and is one of the better run-support corners in this class. His 40 time (4.61) is cause for concern, and he will have to be protected over the top in man coverage. He looks faster on tape than his timed speed indicates, but he clearly lacks elite speed.

    How he fits: 

    This Bucs secondary has been a disaster in the past couple years -- both in terms of personnel and scheme. For as long as we can remember, the Bucs have played a Cover 2 zone concept, which required physicality, but not turn-and-run cover guys. This coaching staff is trying to play a lot more man-to-man schemes, but it just doesn't have the players to get it done. That leads to allowing a tremendous amount of big plays. Newly acquired cornerback Darrelle Revis goes a long way toward fixing this weakness, but Ronde Barber is near the end of his career and might not be back. The rest of Tampa Bay's corner options aren't very exciting. The edge of this secondary needs speed and the ability to shut down vertical plays. Banks seems to be more of a short-to-intermediate cover guy. So this might not be a perfect fit.
  • What he brings: 

    Short has an inconsistent motor, but if his work ethic improves his conditioning could improve and that concern could lessen. However, he's a late-first round talent when at his best. Short is a disruptive interior run-stuffer, and has enough strength to hold his ground one-on-one. If he can keep his pads low consistently, Short will help improve a run defense. He can also stay on the field in passing situations, with the foot speed, powerful hands and lower-body strength to push the pocket.

    How he fits: 

    The edge of this defensive line, with Charles Johnson and Greg Hardy, is excellent. The interior has been a consistent problem. The Panthers have given up too many inside run plays, produced marginal inside pass-rush pressure and there's very little depth. With their first two picks going to big, physical defensive tackles, this line has dramatically changed. The biggest beneficiary might be the linebackers -- especially Luke Kuechly, who now has players in front of him to eat up blocks and allow him to fly to the ball. Both Star Lotulelei and Short can play all three downs, which can add up to inside pressure that quarterbacks hate.
  • What he brings: 

    Minter is a physical presence inside, with good instincts and excellent point-of-attack skills. He plays with leverage and balance, and while his closing burst isn't elite, he takes quality angles to the point to maximize his range. Minter also flashes the ability to deliver a big hit. There are concerns, though, about his ability to hold up in space, and shorter arms that can hinder him as a tackler.

    How he fits: 

    In this 3-4 defense, the inside linebacker position has been very strong, but now there is some vulnerability. Paris Lenon is gone, and Arizona's best inside linebacker, Daryl Washington, is suspended for the first four games of 2013. The Cardinals are hopeful that free agent Jasper Brinkley from Minnesota can help bridge the gap. But there isn't very good depth or players to develop at this position. Minter has a chance to step in immediately for Washington, and if he plays well the first four games, he might unseat Brinkley.
  • What he brings: 

    Alonso is a high-energy player with above-average athleticism and closing burst. He has a knack for finding the ball and making big plays, and shows very good awareness in underneath zone coverage. Alonso has the potential to be an impact pass-rusher between the tackles as well. He will get caught out of position at times and could play with more discipline at times, but that can be corrected with coaching.

    How he fits 

    The interior run defense for Buffalo was terrible last season, and the Bills were the worst in the league at allowing yards before contact. They have a couple players in Kelvin Sheppard and strongside linebacker Nigel Bradham, but neither are proven and there's no depth. Without a veteran they can count on at inside linebacker, Alonso has a chance to compete immediately as a starter in this 4-3 defense, which can change up looks to a 3-4 and even a 46. He also might be good enough in coverage to stay on the field on third down in the Bills' 4-2-5 nickel package.
  • What he brings: 

    Escobar's ball skills are strong; he is a polished route runner and does a nice job setting up breaks and getting open underneath. He doesn't have great speed, but he is fast enough to work the seam and pick up some yards after catch. There's a lot to like about his frame and potential as a blocker, but the problem is that it's just potential at this point. He has to improve at the point of attack.

    How he fits: 

    The coaches have wanted to incorporate more two-tight end sets in recent years. But the backups to starter Jason Witten aren't really pass-catching types. Escobar is a receiving-type player who can move and flex, and he will give this pass offense much more flexibility. Look for Escobar and Witten to continue to run a lot of seam routes, and Escobar should be an excellent matchup receiver. He also provides insurance for Witten, who's still playing at a high level but is entering his 11th pro season. Tony Romo likes to use sight adjustment with his tight ends, which means Escobar needs to be a quick study in this offense to instill confidence.
  • What he brings: 

    The biggest question about Bell is his initial burst, but he is one of the most versatile players in this draft. He has great patience, vision and power between the tackles, and can run over defenders and make them miss. In the passing game, he is an above-average route runner who can line up in the slot, split wide or release out of the backfield. Bell is also an excellent overall pass blocker.

    How he fits: 

    For as long as we can remember, this offense has been identified as a physical run attack that sets up the passing game. But in the past couple years, inconsistent play and key injuries have taken away almost all of the Steelers' big-play ability. The coaches are demanding a more productive inside run game, but the players they have to get it done just aren't special. Bell will have every chance to start immediately, and he can give the Steelers not only power, but explosive plays that they've been missing in the run game. If he's productive, it takes a lot of pressure off Ben Roethlisberger and makes Pittsburgh's play-action package a legitimate weapon.
  • What he brings: 

    He is a massive interior presence with above-average athletic ability for his size. Hankins can handle blockers one-on-one and shed them in time to make the play. He won't be a productive pass-rusher in terms of sacks, but he can disrupt the pocket. The downside of his size is limited burst and a tendency to wear down at times.

    How he fits: 

    While there has been concern about the overall decline of this defensive line, it looked as if there might be more problems on the edge than inside. The Giants seem to have done a nice job in free agency by adding defensive tackles Cullen Jenkins and Mike Patterson from Philadelphia to team with the other starter, Linval Joseph. The Giants also have veteran Shaun Rogers and a young player they like, Marcus Kuhn, who was a rookie in 2012. The only significant player New York lost was Chris Canty. Hankins is also probably only a two-down player who won't likely contribute on the edge. This looks like a classic value pick, rather than a need pick.
  • What he brings: 

    Bostic tested better than anticipated at the combine, and he is strong and uses his hands well at the point of attack. However, he is inconsistent at times with his run fits, and he is a little tight changing directions. Still, he has the size and top-end speed to develop into a quality starting middle linebacker in the Bears' scheme.

    How he fits: 

    Obviously there's a tremendous need at middle linebacker with the departure of Brian Urlacher, although the Bears seem to have a short-term fix with the signing of veteran free agent D.J. Williams from Denver. This allows Bostic time to develop because the other backups don't seem to be impact players. The good news is the Bears will continue to be able to run their 4-3 defense, but they will play a lot more man-to-man schemes than the Cover 2 we've seen for years. This means Bostic won't have to drop into deep zones -- but it will be necessary for him to be productive in man-to-man to stay on the field on third down.
  • What he brings: 

    There is no question Amerson has everything you want in terms of size, length and top-end speed. He took a step back in 2012, though, after leading the nation in interceptions in 2011. The biggest concerns are his inability to quickly transition out of breaks and his struggles when turning to locate the ball. However, if you play to his strengths and put him in press-man coverage, he can be an asset.

    How he fits: 

    This secondary really struggled in pass defense last season, and it was really exposed by quarterbacks who attacked vertically. Washington has one player that it can count on somewhat, DeAngelo Hall, but his play is starting to slip. The other corners, Josh Wilson, Richard Crawford and E.J. Biggers, are just average players competing for the No. 2 position. This group is really exposed when it has to go to sub packages against multi-receiver sets. Defensive coordinator Jim Haslett likes to play press schemes, which fits the skill set of Amerson, but he's not a turn-and-run vertical cover player.
  • What he brings: 

    Collins needs to get better taking on blocks, and he has just average instincts. His value is that he can get after the quarterback. He ran a 4.64 at the combine and that speed shows up on tape. He can get around the corner and closes very well. There is also a lot to like about his tackling, doing a nice job wrapping in space and delivering big hits on quarterbacks. You would like to see more consistent effort at times, though.

    How he fits: 

    This is a bit of a curious pick because linebacker didn't appear to be a need for this defense. New England's starting linebackers are a strength of the team. The Patriots get a lot of production from outside linebackers Jerod Mayo and Dont'a Hightower, so this looks like a classic value pick. One thing that may work in Collins' favor is his versatility. He should be able to play outside linebacker in their 3-4 look and defensive end when they go to 4-3, or he could even play up in that scheme. We know the Patriots really like to change things up to keep offenses off balance. In Collins, they get a player who can add depth and versatility, and he might really be able to help the Pats in their edge pass rush.
  • What he brings: 

    Hunt is a huge, freakish athlete who is still developing as a football player. The level of competition he faced late in 2012 is questionable, but it's tough to deny the strides he made, especially as a pass-rusher. He is strong enough to get off blocks and fast enough to chase backs down from behind. And with his length, leaping ability and timing makes him a terror both in terms of affecting passing lanes and blocking kicks.

    How he fits: 

    The Bengals love to have a deep rotation in their defensive line. That unit was terrific last season, and everybody is back. This didn't appear to be a critical need, but Hunt is an interesting pick. He's somewhat of a raw player with limited experience who will have time to develop behind solid veterans. Hunt also has some versatility as a player who fits best as a 4-3 edge rusher, but he could even move down inside in nickel situations as a one-gap penetrator. While he's learning the nuances of the defensive end position, he could make an immediate contribution on special teams as a kick blocker. This is a developmental value pick.
  • What he brings: 

    Taylor has prototypical size and plays with great balance, and shows above-average change-of-direction skills. He has great eyes in coverage and does a great job maintaining strong position. In addition, he flashes an extra gear to recover and the ability to locate and play the ball. Taylor is willing to step up in run support, but could become more physical and efficient in that area.

    How he fits: 

    This wasn't a great perimeter cover group in 2012, partly because of injuries and partly because of inconsistent play. Miami's best corner, Sean Smith, is gone, along with Bryan McCann. The Dolphins did add a premier free agent in Brent Grimes from Atlanta, but this secondary only produced 10 interceptions last season. Big plays and creating turnovers wasn't a strength. The Dolphins love to play aggressive man-to-man schemes, which seem to fit Taylor's skill set, and he will likely will be given a great chance to start at left corner, while other players can compete for the slot corner position. This pass defense really needs Taylor to be productive quickly.
  • What he brings: 

    McDonald has trouble separating from man coverage at times because he's tight changing directions, but his burst is impressive both when attacking the seam and after the catch. There are concerns about his hands after an underwhelming Senior Bowl week, but he's not afraid to work the middle and can make tough catches. He just needs to become more consistent in that area.

    How he fits: 

    We knew the 49ers would address this position early in the draft with the loss in free agency of Delanie Walker to Tennessee. More than any other offense in the NFL, they love multi-tight end packages and the ability to be exotic in personnel groupings. While McDonald doesn't have the athleticism and big-play capability of Vernon Davis, he can certainly help as either an in-line or motion player. He can also be a good contributor in the short-to-intermediate passing game. What may be a sneaky strength of this pick is that it will allow the 49ers to use multiple tight ends to force defenses to play sub packages -- then they can come back and run the ball. Those are the kinds of things this coaching staff loves to do.
  • What he brings: 

    Brown is an instinctive player who finds the ball well and shows sideline-to-sideline range. He is light on his feet and holds up well in space, particularly in coverage. He lacks ideal take-on skills, but does a good job wading through traffic and absorbing blocks to disengage and find his gap.

    How he fits: 

    Brown has experience both inside and outside on the college level, but in this Ravens 3-4 defense, he will line up inside and hopefully give them Dannell Ellerbe-type production. The Ravens lost both inside linebackers from last season, Ellerbe and Ray Lewis. Also, with Jameel McClain trying to come back from injury, and the strong possibility that Rolando McClain might not be a part of the team's future, this was a glaring need. Brown will likely be forced to start on opening day, but he has a chance to stay on the field on third down because of good athletic ability, range and cover skills, especially when the Ravens play their "dollar" defense which features two defensive linemen, three linebackers and six defensive backs.
  • What he brings: 

    Swearinger lacks elite size and athleticism, but he is instinctive and that allows him to play faster than his timed speed. He understands positioning and leverage, and takes great angles to the point in coverage. He also plays with an aggressive, physical demeanor in run support, and shows the ability to deliver big hits and jar the ball loose.

    How he fits: 

    The bad news for the Texans is that they lost their best safety, Glover Quin, in free agency. But the good news is they replaced him with future Hall of Fame free safety Ed Reed. However, this secondary gave up too many big inside passing plays a year ago, and it was vulnerable between the hashes. Strong safety Danieal Manning is an up-and-down player who gives up some big plays, so Swearinger has a great chance to compete for the starting strongside job. His skill set fits the position perfectly and should complement what Reed does. If he doesn't unseat Manning immediately, he can give Houston a quality No. 3 option while learning. We don't know how much longer Reed can play, so Swearinger fits a real need.
  • What he brings: 

    Ball shouldered a heavy workload in college, and backs tend to tail off quickly when that is the case. Still, he is a tough runner who fights through contact and shows good vision between the tackles. Ball's top-end speed isn't elite, but he is quick enough to get around the corner and can make the first defender miss. He is also an underrated receiver who didn't get much chance in that area. He can catch the ball well and transition upfield quickly.

    How he fits: 

    In the past couple years, this usually dependable Broncos run game hasn't been very productive. Because of inconsistent personnel and injuries, Peyton Manning was forced to run an almost one-dimensional pass offense. Veterans Willis McGahee and Knowshon Moreno are solid when healthy, but durability and age are question marks. Backup Ronnie Hillman doesn't have enough size to be an every-down back. Denver has really needed a back it can count on. Ball has a chance to be a physical, between-the tackles runner with a heavy workload, and that can lead to offensive balance, a much more effective play-action package and the ability to close out a game. This pick should please Manning.
  • What he brings: 

    Dobson doesn't have great top-end speed, but he can still stretch the field. His release off the line stands out, and he hits his stride quickly. He also tracks the ball well and can make athletic catches down the field. Dobson's frame and ability to separate underneath make him an ideal candidate to be a No. 2 receiver at the next level. He is also competitive as a blocker, over the middle and after the catch.

    How he fits: 

    For the past couple years, the Patriots have had multiple weapons in the short-to-intermediate passing game. But they've been one of the worst offenses in the NFL at stretching the perimeter because they haven't had a deep threat since Randy Moss. New England failed to land Emmanuel Sanders from Pittsburgh as a restricted free agent, so Dobson will be expected to step in and start on the edge. If he can stretch the field like the Pats think he can, it will open up a lot of options underneath. With so many different personnel groupings and sight adjustment as the play develops, Dobson should have success early because he's an instinctive player who has a chance to earn Tom Brady's confidence early in this thinking man's passing game.
  • What he brings: 

    Alford has a lot of upside in terms of athleticism, quick feet and man-cover skills. He transitions well out of breaks and shows good closing burst, but he lacks ideal instincts and is a better athlete than football player at this point. In particular, he struggles in run support and must learn to take better angles in that area. Still, he is the kind of player who can contribute in sub packages and make an immediate impact as a returner.

    How he fits: 

    Corner was an obvious need for this secondary heading into this draft, as the Falcons lost starters Brent Grimes and Dunta Robinson in free agency. The remaining corners, including Asante Samuel, are probably more short-term fixes than long-term solutions. This secondary plays a lot of sub packages -- in fact they play nickel half the time -- which requires a corner depth. Either first-round pick Desmond Trufant or Alford should be able to start immediately, with the other producing in the sub package while waiting to be a starter. But this pick represents a nice job of recognizing and addressing a need.
  • What he brings: 

    Durability concerns likely caused Lacy to drop, and while he needs to develop more third-down ability, he's shown enough as a receiver to believe he'll get there. He is a tough, powerful runner, though, who can get yards after contact and punish defenders in space. And while he doesn't look like a blazer on tape, his speed doesn't raise a red flag.

    How he fits: 

    It seems as if running back is at the top of Green Bay's need list every year, and this draft is no exception. The Packers have tried to manufacture a running game with inferior personnel. They have no offensive balance, and they give Aaron Rodgers very little help. Part of the problem is an offensive line that doesn't run-block very well. Because opposing defenses don't respect the threat of the run game, they can sit back in deep coverages and take away Rodgers' vertical passing game. If Lacy can stay healthy, he can change that. He can be a physical, between-the-tackles runner, eat up the clock -- especially in bad weather -- and can give Rodgers a play-action package he hasn't had in a while.
  • What he brings: 

    Michael might be the most talented back in this class on tape. He has good size, runs behind his pads with power, and also has above-average lateral agility and the ability to accelerate out of cuts. However, a laundry list of injuries and character concerns caused him to drop into the late second round. If Seattle can keep him focused, Michael has a chance to be a steal at this point.

    How he fits: 

    This certainly didn't look like a need, as the Seahawks already have a terrific backfield trio of fullback Michael Robinson and tailbacks Marshawn Lynch and Robert Turbin. So this is a case of simply taking someone off the board whom they had rated highly. If Michael can stay healthy, he can add to a back rotation which Seattle used a lot more than you might think a year ago. The Seahawks could have three tailbacks -- with a lead fullback -- that can wear down defenses and totally control the game. As mentioned, this doesn't look like a need pick, but it may give them the deepest and most physical backfield in the league.