Lions deny Redding freedom 

February, 22, 2007
02/22/07
9:10
AM ET
Lions defensive tackle Cory Redding didn't win his plea with the Lions to let him hit the free agent market. On Wednesday, Redding was giving the franchise tag. Making matters worse, Redding was tagged as a defensive tackle. Unlike Justin Smith, Charles Grant and Dwight Freeney, who were franchised at $8.644 million as defensive ends, Redding ended up getting a $6.775 million tag as a DT. Redding would have been one of the highest-paid players in free agency had he hit the open market. He was hoping to get out of Detroit. The only thing he can hope for is to have the Lions be willing to take fewer than two first-rounders for him in a trade, which Detroit doesn't have to accept. With a half-dozen players on the market, including defensive linemen James Hall and Marcus Bell, the Lions want to keep Redding.

Carr not necessarily in motion: Texans general manager Rick Smith told the Houston media earlier this week that it is not a given that quarterback David Carr will be traded. It's pretty clear the Texans would like to trade for Denver's Jake Plummer and see if they can get value for Carr on the trade market. Both ideas are tricky and have to pair well. Smith said it's not out of the question to have Carr behind center as the starter next season, but it is early in the process.

Quinn limits workouts to just ND: Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn probably won't workout at the combine because his Notre Dame pro-day is scheduled for March 4. Quinn is considered the No. 2 quarterback in the draft behind LSU's JaMarcus Russell, and the combine offers him a pretty good opportunity to bridge the gap between him and Russell. However, most players who have their pro-day scheduled after the combine usually wait until they are on the home field to peak out their skills. For years, most Miami players have foregone workouts in Indianapolis, site of the NFL combine, because the Hurricane school workouts fall within a week time of the NFL event.

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