178 miles north, Rich Rod feels it too 

May, 25, 2010
05/25/10
7:07
AM ET

As my colleague Adam Rittenberg pointed out, the Michigan Wolverines open their official response to the NCAA's Notice of Allegations with a sobering statement:

"The University of Michigan ('the University'), which fielded its first football team in 1878, has won more football games than any institution, all without a major infractions case. After more than 130 years, the University's football program is before the Committee on Infractions for the first time. The University admits the violations in fact occurred. The University is disappointed that its history of no major infractions cases in its football program has ended."

In its response, Michigan admitted that four of the NCAA's five allegations against the program are true, including the "failure to adequately monitor its football program to ensure compliance" regarding the number, duties and activities of countable football coaches. Whether the NCAA thinks the school's punishment wasn't strong enough will be determined on Aug. 13-14.

Let's discuss. If you're a Michigan die-hard or an Ohio State Buckeyes die-hard, that top paragraph is a hefty one, but if you take two steps back, what does this really mean for the future of Rich Rod?


After the jump, Feldman opines on the record Rich Rod might need, given his schedule, to keep his job. It's going to be a daunting task. For the breakdown, you must be an ESPN Insider.

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