Commentary

Early graduation could benefit both players and colleges

Updated: August 9, 2007, 11:27 AM ET
By Antonio Williams | Scouts Inc.
As the number of college players leaving early for the NBA Draft continues to rise, college basketball programs increasingly have to rely on major contributions from incoming freshmen.

(12) Bill Walker
Frank Victores/US PresswireBill Walker missed most of his freshman season with a torn ACL.
Fortunately for college teams, first-year players arrive on campus with more seasoning than in years past, due in large part to AAU competition. Most college programs will have their incoming freshman on campus taking classes and working out with their future teammates during the summer months that lead up to the start of the academic year.

As a result, a number of high school players understand that they have an opportunity to make a major impact for their college team and embark upon an accelerated path to graduate from high school early in order to enroll in college. Usually, this means the prospects take summer school courses to graduate early. And while colleges don't encourage or coax the practice, once the player decides to graduate a year early, it is generally supported.


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Antonio Williams

Basketball Recruiting
Antonio Williams is a recruiting coordinator for Scouts Inc. He previously worked as an NBA scout for Marty Blake Associates.