Mo Williams Advanced Stats

Stats
SEASONP/40R/40A/40TS%ASTTOUSGREBPERWIN%WARP
'03-'0414.73.73.943.316.711.221.85.89.44----
'04-'0514.44.38.650.432.513.220.76.414.10----
'05-'0618.43.76.051.822.710.422.35.515.05----
'06-'0719.05.36.751.923.811.623.77.816.35----
'07-'0818.93.87.056.626.111.322.35.617.23----
'08-'0920.43.94.658.819.010.322.15.917.25----
'09-'1018.53.56.258.024.811.721.35.216.18----
'10-'1118.23.48.550.328.012.625.95.013.93----
'11-'1218.62.74.353.017.99.621.84.015.02----
'12-'1316.73.18.051.929.112.822.54.514.47----
'13-'1415.73.37.050.727.212.620.94.511.87----
'14-'1519.53.58.651.227.611.223.44.915.48----
'14-'15 (Projected)15.83.46.849.926.512.020.24.6--.421.3


Scouting report
+ Shoot-first point guard who is also capable of playing off the ball
+ Streaky scorer better suited to a reserve role
+ Poor defender getting worse as he ages

Analysis
When the Portland Trail Blazers signed Mo Williams as a free agent, they didn't realize they were really getting two players: Dr. Mo and Mr. Williams. Because of his style (shoot first, ask questions later) and reserve role, Williams has become one of the league's more inconsistent players, capable of shooting his team in or out of a game. That's not great news for the Timberwolves, who expect Williams to provide a steadier hand at the point than J.J. Barea.

The net results of Williams' up-and-down season were middling. Because his 3-point percentage dipped, Williams' .507 true shooting percentage was far worse than league average (.541). Williams still used plays at a slightly above-average rate, in part because he turns the ball over relatively often for a backup point guard. Williams is capable of racking up assists, and last season's drop in his assist rate was largely attributable to playing frequently off the ball alongside Damian Lillard.

Defensively, Williams is a liability, especially when he plays shooting guard. Williams is physical, but just not big enough to contend with many shooting guards, and waning quickness is becoming an issue for him against point guards. The net result is that both WARP and ESPN's real plus-minus rated Williams worse than replacement level. Yet Minnesota still gave him a raise from last season's $2.7 million to $3.75 million on a one-year contract.