Writers Bloc: Payback

Updated: June 19, 2003, 9:05 AM ET
By Jim Baker
  • Quick: Who was the second man to walk on the moon? You probably don't know. It's tough being the second person to do something momentous (can anybody name the second person to fly solo across the Atlantic?) and Larry Doby was that second person two times in his career. The first was when he was the next man through the color barrier behind Jackie Robinson when he joined the Indians on July 5, 1947. The second was when he became the second African-American manager after Frank Robinson in 1978 with the White Sox. Doby passed away yesterday at the age of 79. He is remembered here in a New York Times obituary -- the surest sign of a life of significance. Bill Madden also eulogizes him in today's New York Daily News.

  • So Latroy Hawkins is threatening to walk from the Twins after the season? "Where," asks Patrick Reusse of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, "is the gratitude?" Reusse writes that the Twins gave Hawkins a lot of chances to prove himself and a long-term deal on the basis of very little success, so his pronouncement that he was leaving seems a bit disingenuous.

  • On June 11, 1985, the Philadelphia Phillies pounded the living daylights out of the New York Mets. As part of their ongoing series on memorable doings at the soon-to-be-doomed Veterans Stadium, the Philadelphia Inquirer looks back at a game that saw the Phillies leading 16-0 after two innings. Michael D. Schaffer talks to some of the participants in what turned out to be a 26-7 route of a team that won 98 games that year. The thing I remember about that game is how the Phillies had a pretty good chance to get to 30 runs (something that hadn't been done in the 20th Century) and had two men on with nobody out in the eighth, only to come up empty and fall four runs short.
    Jim Baker is an author at Baseball Prospectus and a frequent contributor to Page 2. You can e-mail Jim at bottlebat@gmail.com.
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