Sometimes major league players change teams not because they don't like where they are, but because they see a new opportunity that's a good fit for them. I'm doing something like that.

This is my last blog entry for ESPN.com. While it has been a heck of a ride here at ESPN for the past four years and one I've thoroughly enjoyed, I am leaving to take a job in the pro scouting department of a major league club.

As the saying goes, you're only as good as the people you work with. Well, if that's the case, then I was pretty darned good. I am proud to have been associated with a group of passionate, intelligent and hard-working people whom I truly believe are the best at what they do. I also believe that all of those things describe the people of the organization I'm heading to, or else I wouldn't have made the move.

I have many co-workers to thank for what I've accomplished at ESPN, but I will do that privately. What I would like to do now is thank you, my loyal readers, for giving my work your attention. My job was essentially to go watch baseball games and write and/or talk about what I saw, and I have you readers to thank for giving me that opportunity. Whether you agreed with my opinions or not, I thank all of you who took the time to read, comment, submit a chat question or interact in some way.

If I could leave you with one last bit of advice regarding prospects, it would be one word: Patience. Don't expect too much from "highly regarded prospects" from the get-go, and in turn, don't jump off the bandwagon too quickly if they disappoint. In essence, don't make knee-jerk reactions. A prospect could have 200 great at-bats at Double-A, and people will start advocating a push to get him to the big leagues right away. But not every youngster provides immediate returns, and some players are indeed worth the wait. So manage your expectations accordingly.

With that, I thank you again for coming along for the ride the past four years. It was an honor and a privilege. I am truly appreciative of your support of my work here at ESPN, and grateful to have been able to work with a group with such great talent. I'll be reading their work right alongside the rest of you in the coming weeks and years.

The relative lack of pitching depth is often one of the stories of the Arizona Fall League, and this year's 20th edition was no exception. While there are always a few interesting arms, the league ERA this year was 5.53, which also reflects the good hitting environments in the league parks. No individual team had an ERA under five, the league on-base percentage was .362 and hitters slugged .454 as a whole, or roughly the numbers Andrew McCutchen put up in the big leagues this season.

After seven weeks of following the Fall League, here are 10 quick takeaways from the proceedings; some things I thought were worth mentioning.


For Jason's notes from this year's Arizona Fall League action, you must be an ESPN Insider.