NCF On The Trail: Bo Pelini

Are four-star DT Carlos Davis and his twin, three-star tackle Khalil Davis, still committed to Nebraska? Good luck figuring that out. Plus, handicapping the finalists in advance of Josh Sweat’s Wednesday decision.
Whoever ends up getting the job at Nebraska has to be willing to take the Husker brand on the national recruiting trail. Alabama proved again this weekend why it's the top recruiting program in the country.

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Bo Pelini overcame a lot of challenges on the recruiting trail to post seven seasons of at least nine wins at Nebraska. Pelini’s firing Sunday left recruits wondering why and opened a job that needs a recruiter who can handle some unique difficulties.

In today’s recruiting world, Nebraska is in a very tough spot, literally and figuratively.


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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's regular feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting news across the country. Today’s offerings: Missouri made national headlines when it signed a five-star local prospect in the 2012 class. Now the question facing the Tigers is whether they can do it again with Class of 2015 five-star Terry Beckner Jr. Plus, Nebraska has had good luck with junior-college prospects under Bo Pelini, and the Huskers hope to continue that trend. We also continue our tour of the top recruiting happenings on social media.

[+] EnlargeTerry Beckner
Tom Hauck for Student SportsTerry Beckner Jr. is a vital in-state target for Mizzou.
1. Over the last four classes two of the nation's elite players have come from prospects in Missouri's backyard. In 2012, the state produced No. 3-ranked Dorial Green-Beckham, and he signed with Mizzou before running into off-the-field issues this past offseason that led to his departure. The Tigers are hoping they can replicate the recruiting success -- without the off-field complications -- with No. 4-ranked Beckner. The five-star defensive end is about as must-get of a recruit as there has been for Gary Pinkel in his time in CoMo. To win in the SEC, you have to have beasts on the defensive line, and Beckner is definitely talented. The good news is Missouri looks to be in good shape and will receive an unofficial visit on Oct. 11 for the Georgia game.

2. Without a doubt, “The Maryland Way” will be something that helps the Terps on the recruiting trail. Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson announced Tuesday the implementation of "The Maryland Way Guarantee,” which gives athletes a “lifetime” guarantee on their scholarship even if they can’t compete because of injury. As the Terps move into the B1G, they’re fighting for every advantage they can to keep top talent in the DMV at home and away from conference rivals, and this development will give Randy Edsall some additional recruiting ammo to work with.

3. Nebraska has never been one to go heavy after junior college prospects, but over the years the Huskers have managed to strike gold with a number of two-year prospects. Defensive back DeJon Gomes, linebacker Lavonte David and most recently defensive end Randy Gregory are great examples of juco players recruited by Bo Pelini that have panned out. Defensive back Justin Martin out of Northeastern Oklahoma A&M could be next in line. The Huskers recently offered Martin, and while he doesn’t have favorites listed at this point, he was quite excited about picking up the NU offer. Another factor that could help the Huskers is that his coach, Ryan Held, played at Nebraska.

#WednesdayWisdom
Pursuant to NCAA Bylaw 11.5.1, only coaches who have been certified may contact or evaluate prospective student-athletes off-campus. To become certified, coaches must answer 80 percent of the questions on the NCAA Coaches Certification Test correctly. Here are a few examples of the types of questions coaches must answer correctly:

True or False: An institution's coach may produce a computer recruiting presentation and show it to a prospective student-athlete at the prospective student-athlete's high school.

The answer: True

True or False: It is permissible for a football coach at an institution located in the state of Pennsylvania to conduct several institutional camps in Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri in order to attract more prospective student-athletes from the Midwest.

The answer: False

Social Studies
Marquise Doherty is not only one of the top running backs in the country he’s also one of the top baseball prospects around. So when Doherty tweeted out Tuesday his top five schools -- a list that consisted of Iowa, Oregon, Missouri, Kansas State and Louisville -- he indicated all the schools have talked to him about playing both sports in college. Some have pegged Iowa as the team to beat because his former high school teammate Aaron Mends is a freshman with the Hawkeyes, but Doherty says official visits will be key for him.
Unlike the ACC or SEC, the Big Ten hasn't taken an official position on an early signing period. Many Big Ten coaches see the benefits, but there has been no united front.

Here's a bit of advice: The Big Ten coaches should band together about an urgent recruiting item, but not the early signing period.

The Big Ten must campaign for official visits to be moved up. No other league is affected more by population shifts that have created dense pockets of top recruits located far from its footprint. The Big Ten is expanding its recruiting reach, especially to the Southeast, but its proximity to many talent bases remains a significant obstacle.

If the Big Ten can't get prospects to its campuses before decisions are made, it will continue to fall behind in the recruiting race.

[+] EnlargeBo Pelini
AP Photo/Nati HarnikEarlier official visits would be a boon to Bo Pelini and Nebraska, as the Cornhuskers have to recruit nationally because of a limited local talent base.
"The first thing we have to do is get kids on campus earlier," Michigan coach Brady Hoke told ESPN.com. "I'm sure our friends in the Pac-12 and the SEC would rather not that be the case. They'd rather have kids come in to Ann Arbor if it's winter.

"But I think it would help the guys from distance and the guys from those climates to come on campus to see what it is like."

NCAA rules state that prospects can't begin taking their five official visits -- paid for by the schools -- until the start of their senior year in high school. But many recruits make their college choices much earlier.

The accelerated recruiting cycle has minimized the significance of official visits. Many prospects commit after taking unofficial visits, for which they pay their own way. But the distance between Big Ten schools and the highest concentrations of elite prospects makes it challenging for recruits and their families to fund long, expensive trips.

"Since the trend is for early commitments, it makes sense that it favors schools located in population bases that produce a lot of players," said Big Ten Network analyst Gerry DiNardo, a former coach at Indiana, LSU and Vanderbilt. "So how do you combat that? How does a kid from Atlanta get to Lincoln, Nebraska, in the summer on their own expense?"

DiNardo views Nebraska as the FBS school most impacted by accelerated recruiting cycle. Nebraska always has recruited nationally because of its small local population base, but former coach Tom Osborne -- "a tireless recruiter," DiNardo said -- capitalized on the fact that recruits made their choices after an official visit to Lincoln.

Huskers coach Bo Pelini acknowledges earlier official visits "would help us."

"When you take official visits away from the equation, it really hurts a place like Nebraska," DiNardo said. "So early signing day has to be partnered up with official visits in a prospect's junior year.

"If just the date moves up without official visits, it sets the Big Ten even further behind."

DiNardo notes that a program such as Ohio State is less affected by the official visits timetable because it has a large local talent base that can easily reach its campus. But other Big Ten programs must cast a wider recruiting net.

It's especially true for programs in the western part of the league: Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

"It gives some of the schools that aren't surrounded by a lot of schools or a lot of places, it gives us a chance," Minnesota coach Jerry Kill said. "But I don't know if that's going to happen or not. People in Texas aren't going to vote for that because they never have to leave Texas."

Most Big Ten coaches interviewed by ESPN.com favor earlier official visits but want clear guidelines. One question is timing.

Several coaches mention late May or early June as the ideal time because many recruits already are touring schools unofficially and most staffs are conducting on-campus camps.

"With the way people are traveling around right now, it might be good to afford a prospect to take a couple of visits in June," Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz said. "Also, I think it'd be great to afford at least a parent the opportunity to join that prospect and make it part of the official trip."

Coaches say the parental component is critical.

"Sometimes kids just don't have the means to be able to get here, and they definitely don't have the means to have their parents come," Pelini said. "Hopefully, they'll change that. It's too big of a decision for a 17-year-old or 18-year-old kid to make without his parents or somebody being there."

[+] EnlargeMark Dantonio
Eric Francis/Getty ImagesMark Dantonio wants an early official-visit period, but would prefer for it to be in a limited window instead of spanning the entire spring and summer.
Both Pelini and Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio want a limit on the number of official visitors schools could have in the spring. FBS teams can provide up to 56 official visits, but Dantonio rarely uses more than half of the allotment.

"It's not just carte blanche," Dantonio said. "I would make it a two-week window and cap those numbers."

Allowing 10-20 early official visits could work. Dantonio and Pelini also think prospects should be allowed to take multiple official visits to the same school.

Wisconsin coach Gary Andersen favors an earlier signing date in December, but he needs more clarity on official visits -- when they would take place, and for how long.

"I have to look at quality of life for my coaches," Andersen said. "Are we willing to take 4-5 weeks away in the summer? I don’t want to do that."

Added Purdue coach Darrell Hazell: "You lose your life. The month of July, you need a little bit of decompression time."

The first two weeks in June makes the most sense. Create a dead period in July so coaches can take time off.

It also doesn't mean official visits in September and October will stop. Andersen can talk about Wisconsin's "Jump Around" and show videos, but, he said, "there’s nothing like being there."

Big Ten teams still will have the chance to showcase their stadiums, facilities and campuses during football season. But they can't afford to wait that long for far-flung prospects to arrive, especially when they can afford to bring them in sooner.

"It would help everybody," Hoke said. "The other conferences aren’t just staying in their region, either."

That's true, but the Big Ten has the most to gain, and pushing for change won't be easy.

"If that thing ever goes to a vote, everybody is going to say is that the Big Ten is just complaining," Indiana coach Kevin Wilson said. "They'll keep rallying their troops because they want to keep those kids at home."

The Big Ten coaches must rally, too. Otherwise, the recruiting gap will widen.

Momentum seems to be building for creating an early signing period in college football. The Conference Commissioners Association will discuss the idea as part of its agenda at a meeting later this month.

As with many things in life, the devil is in the details. The ACC recommended an early signing date of Aug. 1. The SEC at its meetings last month came out against changing the recruiting calendar, but would like to use the Monday after Thanksgiving if an early signing period does happen.

The Big Ten has not endorsed a specific stance on an early signing date as a conference. Based on interviews given to ESPN.com and other media outlets, most league coaches are in favor of it. Again, though, preferences on the when and the how differ.

Several coaches support the junior college signing period of mid-December as the right time to allow high school prospects who don't want to wait until February to sign their national letters of intent.

[+] EnlargeKirk Ferentz
Steve Mitchell/USA TODAY SportsIowa's Kirk Ferentz is among the Big Ten coaches who favor an early signing period after the regular season.
"To me, that would be the perfect time," Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz said last summer. "I still don't understand the resistance. All it is is an opportunity to sign. They don't have to sign. I don't think anyone is going to lose a scholarship. It just gives everyone a chance to lay their cards on the table and say, 'I'm 100 percent sure now' or, 'Still not quite there.' That would be great for both parties, I think."

Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald, Wisconsin's Gary Andersen and Michigan State's Mark Dantonio are among others who back an early signing period in December.

"It sure would clear up recruiting for a lot of us," Andersen told ESPN.com. "In my opinion, if a kid's committed, let's have him go to the school where he wants to go, and we'll move on in recruiting and get the guys we want. I think it's the most logical answer."

A possible downside of having the early signing period in December would be that it puts more pressure on coaches to concentrate on recruiting late in the season, when championships could be on the line, or during bowl preparation. In-season recruiting pressures would grow even higher with the SEC's post-Thanksgiving recommendation.

Most who favor an early signing period say their schools and coaching staffs are spending too much valuable time, money and energy trying to re-recruit players who might have signed earlier. That's why some coaches, such as Indiana's Kevin Wilson, support a signing date before or right at the beginning of the season.

"I had guys who were committed in the summer who in the last weekend [before the February signing date] changed their minds," Wilson told ESPN.com. "It would be nice if there was an early signing period on the first of September. I don't know if we've got to move the calendar up, but we waste a lot of time and a lot of money babysitting kids who have made their decisions."

Michigan is one school that could have benefited in recent seasons from an early signing period. The Wolverines have sewn up the majority of their classes under Brady Hoke in the summer before the prospects' senior year of high school. Hoke's staff could have locked up those commitments and focused on filling out the final few spots or moving on to the following year's class.

Hoke would like to see an early signing date, but with a caveat.

"If there's an early signing period, there probably needs to be an early visitation period for those kids," he told ESPN.com. "Maybe the first two weeks in June to get on your campus."

That's a big deal for Big Ten coaches, who would love to see prospects be able to take official visits before the start of their senior year. An early signing date without an earlier visit calendar could put the league at a disadvantage against schools in more talent-rich areas. (We'll look more closely at this issue on Thursday in the blog.)

[+] EnlargeBo Pelini
Eric Francis/Getty ImagesNebraska's Bo Pelini says allowing earlier official visits must be a part of any move toward an early signing period.
Nebraska's Bo Pelini has said he would not support an earlier signing date without those earlier visits (and even then, he said he would need more time to study the issue). Schools such as Nebraska and Minnesota, which are farther away from talent-rich hubs, simply wouldn't see many benefits to an early signing day if the rest of the recruiting calendar remained the same. Players in blue chip-heavy areas -- such as the South, Texas and California -- would be more apt to take unofficial visits at schools closer to home and then could get pressured into signing before they ever made a trip up north.

Ohio State under Urban Meyer has thrived during the final weeks of recruiting before the February signing day, as his staff has built a reputation of being great "closers." So it's no surprise that Meyer was one of three SEC coaches to vote against a proposal to support an early signing date in 2008, when he was still at Florida. Meyer said at the time that "recruiting should be done in December, January and February. I think [an early date] speeds up 17- and 18-year-olds to make a decision that affects the rest of their lives."

Maryland's Randy Edsall has proposed that schools shouldn't even send out any type of scholarship offer until Sept. 1 of a high school prospect's senior year in high school, and then those offers would come from the university's admissions office, not the coaches. That would slow things way down and make sure prospects have achieved the necessary test scores and admission standards. Yet Edsall also said this spring that if recruiting continues at its current accelerated pace, that "there definitely has to be an early signing period."

There are other issues with the early signing date, including what protection the players would have if the coach left for another job after they signed. Plus plans change in recruiting all the time.

"I see the pluses and the minuses with it," Dantonio told ESPN.com. "If you have a committed guy and he signs with you, he truly is committed. That’s a positive. I also think if you take one quarterback and he thinks he’s the only one, and all of a sudden you take two, how does that all play out?

"I do think it keeps people from poaching off you, whether it be us poaching off somebody or somebody else [poaching]. It makes people hold to their word. If they don't want to sign then, they’re still open, and you know they’re open. But I would make it a mid-December type deal. I’m not in favor of August; I'm not in favor of September. I'm in favor of, ‘They've had a chance to at least visit and be on campus a couple places, so they have a feel.’”

College football does appear headed for an early signing date soon, if only the details can get ironed out.

"We get into these discussions, and everybody kind of has their own agenda of what's in the best interests for their school," Penn State coach James Franklin told ESPN.com. "But for a lot of different reasons, an early signing period makes sense for everybody."
The Big Ten is rich and getting richer in the coming years. So how is the investment translating with football programs?

Not surprisingly, recruiting expenses are on the rise throughout the league. The (Cedar Rapids) Gazette's Scott Dochterman recently outlined Big Ten recruiting costs for the last three fiscal years, which shows that the league's 11 publics schools spent $6.47 million in recruiting in FY 2013, up from $4.1 million in FY 2011. Northwestern, a private institution, does not have to publicly report its expenses.

What stands out about these numbers?
  • Nebraska has spent more on recruiting than any Big Ten team in the past two seasons: $818,509 in 2013 and $752,681 in 2012. Bo Pelini's program is trying to boost its presence in Big Ten territory, maintain a presence in Texas and California, and scoop up prospects from the fertile Southeast. That costs money, and Nebraska's geography doesn't help.
  • Illinois is second in recruiting expenses for the second consecutive year, devoting $791,972 in FY 2013. I'll say this for Illinois: It invests enough in football. The program shelled out for former coordinators Paul Petrino and Vic Koenning. Tim Beckman shouldn't complain about his recruiting budget. But the investment needs to start showing returns very soon.
  • If asked which Big Ten school spends the least on recruiting, few folks likely would select Wisconsin. Like Nebraska, Wisconsin faces geographical challenges in recruiting and, under former coach Bret Bielema, ramped up its efforts in Florida for players such as James White and Aaron Henry. But these numbers show Wisconsin spent by far the least on recruiting in FY 2013 ($256,967) and, unlike other Big Ten programs, hasn't had dramatic increases the past two years. Assistant salaries were an issue for Bielema, who lost quite a few top aides in his final two seasons. I wonder how the recruiting budget impacted his decision to leave for Arkansas, and how the investment could change for coach Gary Andersen.
  • Penn State has had the biggest increases in recruiting investment, going from $258,800 in FY 2011 -- the second-lowest total in the league -- to $443,022 in FY 2012 and then to $736,739 in FY 2013, the third-highest total in the league. The program spent much more under Bill O'Brien than it did during the end of the Joe Paterno era, and the investment should continue to increase under James Franklin, one of the more aggressive recruiters in the country.
  • Although Ohio State spent about $200,000 more on recruiting in FY 2013 than FY 2012, the Buckeyes are in the bottom half of the league in expenses. Geography is a big reason, as they don't have to travel nearly as far as other league programs to scout some of the top players in the Big Ten region.
  • It's interesting that Michigan's recruiting costs actually went down from FY 2011 to FY 2012 before going up to $664,492 in FY 2013. The Wolverines signed top-10 recruiting classes in 2012 and 2013.

A lot of interesting numbers here. Recruiting costs will continue to rise around the FBS, and it will be interesting to see which Big Ten teams invest more in non-coaching, recruiting-specific staff. Programs in other leagues -- cough, SEC, cough -- have been on hiring sprees, causing a lot of national discussion about limiting staff size.
Michael Decker doesn’t get into football recruiting.

Actually, he’s entrenched in it as a coveted 2015 offensive lineman prospect at Omaha (Neb.) North who committed to Nebraska two weeks ago.

But Decker doesn’t study recruiting in the manner many recruits and fans do. He knew little about the Cornhuskers’ class when he turned down Kansas State and likely deterred others from making him a priority next fall.

Decker weighed his options and determined that nothing could beat what Nebraska offered.

Refreshing, huh?

[+] EnlargeDaishon Neal
Tom Hauck for Student SportsDefensive end Daishon Neal was one of two prospects from Omaha that committed to Nebraska on April 9.
Same goes for defensive end Daishon Neal of Omaha Central, who committed within hours of Decker on April 9. Neal accepted on the day Nebraska offered, even after he had just returned from a visit to Oklahoma State with the expectation that it would offer a scholarship if he returned for camp.

“It’s always been a dream of mine,” Neal said of his pledge to the Huskers.

While their commitments might look like formalities -- Nebraska built its championship pedigree on backs of homegrown talent -- these decisions were not routine.

“A lot of people think if you’re from Nebraska, Nebraska is where you’re going to go,” Decker said. “But I wasn’t dead set on them. I was definitely going to think it through.”

Decker and Neal don’t rank as the most touted recruits in the Huskers’ 12th-ranked class. It sits second in the Big Ten to Penn State with 10 members, unprecedented results for Nebraska during this period of spring evaluation.

The group includes ESPN 300 cornerback Eric Lee and quarterback Kevin Dillman.

The Nebraskans perhaps best illustrate the changes at work for the Huskers in recruiting.

Neither was a shoo-in for coach Bo Pelini’s program. Decker’s family roots wind to Michigan and the East Coast. He was born in Indiana. Neal moved to Nebraska two years ago from Texas to pursue a football scholarship and train with his father, Abraham Hoskins Jr., a former receiver at Purdue.

Recruits are more aware of what lies outside the borders of their states than in the time Tom Osborne built his dynasty in Lincoln.

The trends are no different in Nebraska than Michigan or New Jersey.

But the Huskers, after slipping a step with prospects close to home, are making the necessary adjustments.

Nebraska aggressively pursued the pair of Omahans.

Decker pondered his offer for about three months.

Neal said he expected the Huskers to play him slowly. His dad warned Neal that Nebraska rarely offers in-state prospects. When he received a message in class on that Wednesday afternoon this month to call Nebraska assistant Barney Cotton, Neal knew the Huskers meant business.

His father thought he was joking.

Maybe Nebraska has learned from recent failures. It waited too late into the summer last year to offer defensive end Harrison Phillips of Omaha. He had already grown close to coaches at Stanford and Kansas State and committed to the Cardinal after the Huskers joined the pursuit.

Iowa has signed a handful of Nebraskans in recent years, several of whom were not offered by the Huskers. Quarterback-turned-receiver Daryle Hawkins left for Oregon, linemen Trevor Robinson and Harland Gunn for Notre Dame and Miami, respectively. All three are from Omaha.

The Huskers signed three Nebraskans in February after just one apiece in 2012 and 2013.

Has the lack of in-state blood contributed to the school’s conference-title drought? It hasn’t helped.

History shows that when Nebraska finds difference-makers from its home state, championships follow. Heisman Trophy winners Johnny Rodgers and Eric Crouch, two-time Outland Trophy winner Dave Rimington and Ahman Green, Nebraska's No. 2 all-time rusher, share Omaha as a hometown.

It’s not a simple formula, of course, and the local high schools must produce the talent for Nebraska to recruit.

But the willingness to adjust as times change, even inside the borders of its state, bodes well for Pelini.

The coach added to his recruiting staff this offseason with the hiring of former Southeast Missouri State assistant Kenny Wilhite, an ex-Nebraska defensive back, and UMass assistant Brian Crist.

They’ve helped with the acceleration of evaluations, organization and offers.

“Recruiting is speeding up,” Pelini said as spring practice concluded recently. “That’s reality.

“The more we can get out ahead of things, the deeper we can make our boards, the more stones we can turn over and make sure that we get exposed to guys a lot faster, [the better it serves Nebraska]."

Recruiting successes like Decker and Neal won’t alone take the Huskers to a conference title, but at Nebraska, there’s no better place to start.

Nebraska lands ESPN Junior 300 DB 

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Despite having some work left to do in the 2014 class, Nebraska hosted some top junior targets this weekend. The Cornhuskers’ weekend went off with a boom as the coaching staff picked up its first commitment for the 2015 class.

Cornerback Eric Lee (Highlands Ranch, Colo./Valor Christian), the No. 217 prospect in his class, committed to the Cornhuskers on Saturday while on his visit.

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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's regular feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings. Today’s offerings: Nebraska coach Bo Pelini brought his lucky charm with him on the recruiting trail Wednesday; while a lot of fans are focused on Adoree' Jackson and John Smith, schools haven’t forgotten about Damien Mama; and Notre Dame’s upgrades to its facilities will help on the trail.

Hope recruits don’t have allergies


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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's regular feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings. Wednesday's offerings: Florida State should be able to further strengthen its top-five recruiting class after winning the national championship; we know when No. 2 ranked 2015 prospect George Campbell will make a decision; and losing defensive back coach Terry Joseph to Texas A&M will hurt the Nebraska’s recruiting efforts.

Victory should give Seminoles momentum
How will Florida State’s national title help on the recruiting trail? After the smoke cleared from Monday night’s game, I asked one of the FSU assistants for his thoughts on the topic. His response wasn’t surprising. “We had heard from a few kids this year that FSU was always over ranked and never won anything,” said the assistant, who asked not to be named. “But you can take that off the board now. It’s gone. We’ve already started to get calls from a lot of our top remaining targets and almost all of our commits. They are fired up about the national title. We can’t wait to get back on the road after the dead period and talk to them face to face about how it’s just a first step in what will be a big run for Florida State.” Florida State sits at No. 4 in the ESPN Class Rankings but with a few key recruits still looking hard at the Noles they could easily climb even higher.

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#AskLoogs: Will Pelini tape stick?

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Want to ask ESPN RecruitingNation senior analyst Tom Luginbill a question about your team? Tweet it to @TomLuginbill using the hashtag #AskLoogs.



It certainly can’t help because it brings negative publicity and attention to the program, and as this program stands right now, it has enough to deal with without any other distractions piling on.

In all honesty, I don’t believe prospects place much stock in this kind of stuff. They place far more stock in how the program is performing, the overall national perception of the program, relationships with coaches who are recruiting them and -- more than anything at the end of the day -- they care about winning. Nebraska has resources, they have a great fan base and they have a long-standing tradition of excellence as a university. What they are struggling with right now is relevancy as a result of a diminished player pool and lack of productivity on the field, particularly on defense.

Times have changed and moving out of the Big 12 has hurt their recruiting efforts in Texas, in our opinion. Perception is everything in the eyes of prospects and that is something Nebraska is battling right now. Since the advent of cable television, Nebraska’s national identity has slowly diminished over time because in this day and age just about everybody goes to a bowl and plays on TV. A luxury Nebraska and a few other programs owned for decades is no longer an advantage.

Any incidents related to Bo Pelini’s actions only adds fuel to the fire, unfortunately.

Early Offer: NU recruits stand by Pelini 

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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's latest feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings. Today's offerings: Bo Pelini’s critics have come out of the wood work, but recruits are standing by the Huskers’ head coach; Dodge City CC is normally known as one of the doormats of junior college football, but that’s changing thanks to talent like cornerback Danzel McDaniel; and Oklahoma is learning the downside of early recruiting is that it makes it easier to identify quality players like Joshua Wariboko.

Recruits sticking with Pelini
Monday was a day that Nebraska coach Bo Pelini will never forget. First Pelini responded sharply to the suggestion by former Nebraska quarterback Tommie Frazier that the Huskers dump their entire defensive staff. Then he had to play damage control after an audio recording from 2011 surfaced in which he criticized fans during an expletive-laced rant. While fans took to social media with choice words of their own, the embattled coach was defended by a number of former players and several recruits. Three-star safety Luke Gifford (Lincoln, Neb./Southeast) has been the most vocal of Huskers commit so far when he tweeted Monday night that he loves coach Pelini and hopes to have him as a coach for years to come.
The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's latest feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings.

Zack Darlington
Tom Hauck for Student SportsNebraska coach Bo Pelini has to make a tough decision after 2014 QB commit Zack Darlington got injured.
Today's offerings: With questions about Zack Darlington’s future lingering, Nebraska coach Bo Pelini has to make a tough decision about recruiting another quarterback in the 2014 class. There’s still plenty of meat left on the bone for the 2014 class; and the Miami Central-Miami Booker T. Washington game will showcase seven Cane and Gator recruits.


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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's latest feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings. Today's offerings: The Trojans are in great shape to land ESPN 300 defensive end Malik Dorton and remain a viable option for top California talent, what one SEC recruiter thinks LSU’s chances are with Clifton Garrett, and a busy September is on tap for the Huskers with official visits.


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