Best of the bad recruiting pitches

July, 25, 2014
Jul 25
10:00
AM ET
Football prospects will hear a lot of recruiting pitches before they get to officially become college football players. Some are good, some bad and some are, shall we say, interesting. But some are downright unfortunate.

When we conducted our RecruitingNation survey of the top 300 players we asked about unique pitches and also some of the dumbest pitches. Here are some of those answers, as well as a few recruiting fails from Twitter:

ESPN 300 running back Mike Weber has a slew of programs after him. Being a Detroit native, not surprisingly, many of his suitors come from the Big Ten. Among them are conference heavyweights Michigan and Ohio State.

The Wolverines got creative in their recruiting pitch, using a mocked-up magazine cover featuring Weber. The idea was sound, but went a little awry.

 

Not to be outdone, Ohio State got all fancy with the PhotoShop as well. Sadly, the Buckeyes' magazine suffered from a similar lack of editing.

 

Maybe both schools should add an editor to their staff. On the bright side for the Wolverines -- tons of players become all-Americans, but how many earn the All-Amercian honors?

Going from bad spelling to just bad is what has become the Kansas Jayhawks’ recruiting pitch.

KU coach Charlie Weis drew headlines last summer for calling his team a "pile of crap." At least, according to recruits who took part in our survey, he is staying on message and using that as a recruiting pitch.

"They told me [the] team was so bad that I could play right away," said one respondent of Kansas' pitch.

Based upon another recruit’s answer, Weis might be employing a bit of reverse psychology now as well.

"[Weis said] 'So why would you want to go to that other school? Just because they won a few more games than us? So what.'"

If the message is being received, it's hard to tell. At least based on Weis' now-famous tweet from a KU football camp at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City.

 

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.