Need a QB? The clock is ticking

April, 2, 2014
Apr 2
12:15
PM ET


Welcome to quarterback hunting season. If your team is looking to land an elite QB, this is the prime time to secure a commitment. Historically, quarterbacks are the first position group off the board.

Looking at the timing of the commitments of the top 20 quarterbacks from 2010 to 2014, the busiest months were April to July, when 59 percent of those quarterbacks made their commitment. Of the top 20 quarterbacks in the class of 2015, nine are already committed.

QB commitments
Teams looking to get a quarterback need to strike during the spring evaluation period.
"The time between April and July is a big evaluation period for college coaches," Auburn signee Sean White said. "Here in Florida we have spring football, so the coaches come watch you and that's when a lot of visits take place. That's a big recruiting period during that time for quarterbacks."

In the past five recruiting cycles, only three quarterbacks -- Asiantii Woulard, Treon Harris and Joshua Dobbs -- among the top 20 at the position committed in February after their senior season. That number is astonishing considering  that most top-level prospects wait to make a commitment.

The quarterback position is different, though, as 78 percent of the top 20 during this time period committed prior to their senior season -- and the spring evaluation period, which runs from April 15 to May 31, generally serves as the start of the busy four months.

The primary reason for the trend, according to several FBS assistant coaches, is that a program typically takes only one quarterback in each class. Prospects know that their scholarship could be snatched up by someone else if they don't act quickly.

"I might take four offensive linemen in one class, and if we get one lineman, there are still a few spots left," one assistant coach said. "A quarterback knows there is only one spot, so he knows his spot is in jeopardy."



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