DB Clark talks Big 12 commitment

July, 27, 2013
7/27/13
5:20
PM ET
For three-star athlete Joseph Clark (Tyler, Texas/Chapel Hill), a college decision wasn’t about which school. It was all about when -- as in when would he make his decision public.

Clark has been a Texas Tech lean for several weeks, and on Saturday, the 5-foot-9, 170-pound athlete gave his verbal commitment to coach Kliff Kingsbury and the Red Raiders staff during an unofficial visit in Lubbock, Texas.

Clark is the 17th commitment for Texas Tech. He’s played cornerback, safety and outside linebacker for Chapel Hill, but he said he was recruited to play cornerback at the next level. Clark additionally could see time at safety for the Red Raiders.

Clark had additional offers from Air Force, Texas State, McNeese State and Incarnate Word. He said his decision ultimately came down to Texas Tech and Air Force, as he really liked what Air Force had to offer from an academic standpoint.

Playing in the Big 12, however, was something Clark said he couldn’t pass up.

“I’m not going to lie, that was a big part of it,” Clark said of playing in one of college football’s power conferences. “I always wanted to play big-time football. When I got the chance, it was something I couldn’t let go.”

The conference had an impact, but Clark’s decision also was influenced by Texas Tech’s coaching staff. He’s been a fan of Kingsbury, and he and safeties coach Trey Haverty and cornerbacks coach Kevin Curtis -- two coaches who were big in his recruiting -- have built solid relationships.

Clark will work with Haverty and Curtis closely once he arrives to Texas Tech, and he feels he can develop into a star college player with their tutelage.

“Coach Kingsbury, Coach Havery and Coach Curtis are all cool people,” Clark said. “To me, it was definitely the coaches. They really made me feel at home, and I love being there. I know I can learn a lot from them.”

Clark was a member of Chapel Hill’s Texas Class 3A Division I state-championship team in 2011.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.