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Thursday, January 10, 2013
Jacob Kaiser a rising 2014 quarterback

By Damon Sayles

Jacob Kaiser (St. Joseph, Mo./Central) looks at quarterbacks such as Drew Brees, Russell Wilson and Johnny Manziel and smiles. None of them are the prototypical quarterback; yet, all of them are proven winners.

To a lesser extent, Kaiser can relate. The 2014 signal-caller said Central, a school founded in 1895, has only won three playoff games. Two of those wins have come with him under center.

“I take a lot of pride in that,” Kaiser said. “Every quarterback likes their personal stats, but my thing is to get victories.”

Listed right at 6 foot and 185 pounds, Kaiser loves the fact that with every move on the football field, he defeats a quarterback stereotype. Understanding clock management and being a true field general has made Kaiser a player to watch. He threw for roughly 1,900 yards, 24 touchdowns and six interceptions.

Additionally, Kaiser rushed for roughly 300 yards, leading Central to a repeat postseason berth and trip to the second round of the Missouri Class 5 playoffs. His play thus far has attracted interest from Memphis and Tulsa, two schools he’s looking to schedule unofficial visits to in the future.

“I want to obviously get my name out more and prove I’m under the radar and that I can be a Division I quarterback," Kaiser said. "I have what it takes between the ears and physically to get it done. I’m not the prototype 6-3 quarterback, but I like to break down those stereotypes.”

Kaiser is considered a dual-threat quarterback, but he doesn’t want his passing ability to go unnoticed. He said his arm strength and accuracy are among his strong points; however, he’s smart enough to get out the pocket and make plays with his feet when necessary.

He’s hoping those traits equate to FBS scholarships and new looks in the near future.

“I just try to be very smart with the ball,” he said. “I look to keep the drive alive. You have to be diligent and aware of game-time management. Coaches compliment me on that quite a lot. I try to be a coach on the field.”