#AskCoachB: Reasons for transfers

November, 4, 2013
11/04/13
12:30
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Last year college basketball had more than 450 Division-I transfers, which has been the highest amount to date. There are many reasons why these numbers have escalated. Recently the NCAA adopted a rule that if you graduate from a school and have a year of eligibility remaining you can go to another school that has a master's degree that your current school does not have. That has added to the number of transfers.

Here are three reasons why we are seeing more kids transfer in college basketball.

1. Playing time and style of play

Everyone wants to play right away and recruits want a guaranteed amount of shots or minutes. When that does not happen, players get frustrated and look away rather than in the mirror. Playing time is earned by your daily performance and progress in practice, not by your reputation coming onto campus. Today everyone is on TV or the Internet so a recruit must not only watch how a team plays before he commits but ask the coach questions about his style of play and the coach’s plans for the player.

2. Coaching changes

Each season we have close to 50 coaching changes in Division I basketball for many reasons. When that happens, assistant coaches leave as well. A letter of intent might be signed with the school but the reason a prospect picked a school is the relationship with the head coach and his staff.

Coaches move on to better jobs or they get released from their duties. Either way it opens up the door for more transfers.

3. Uninformed decisions

Going too fast in the recruiting process just to make a decision leaves questions unanswered and players with more doubt than security. There is no perfect situation, but it's important to go through the process without playing around so each student-athlete can make an informed decision.

Paul Biancardi

Basketball Recruiting

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