#AskCoachB: Can Tate be a five-star?

September, 18, 2013
9/18/13
12:30
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Every time we watch Jae'Sean Tate (Pickerington, Ohio/Pickerington) he has impressed us with his physical style of play from defense to rebounding. He has improved immensely in scoring. When you look at our grading scale 90-100 is a high-major plus prospect (5 stars) and to go along with this would be a brief description to earn that lofty reputation. "A player who demonstrates rare abilities along with the traits that only champions possess. He should have an immediate impact at a national program with the potential for early entry into the NBA."

Usually every year in the top 100 there is anywhere from 15-25 5-star players and of course it solely depend on their performances, production and potential. Currently Tate is ranked No. 29 in the ESPN 100 and carries a grade of 89 which is the high end of the 4-star rating scale. He is not polished enough from an offensive standpoint to be a 5-star prospect but is working himself in that direction. He is on the cusp of being a five-star, but regardless of his ranking or grade it's equally important to read his evaluation as well.

He has earned that praise because he affects the outcome of a game with his defense, rebounding and tenacity on each play. He is looking to take on the opposing team's best player and working to shut him down. He is committed to the glass and scores by driving and posting up. Recently he has added a open three-point shot when he has time, space and his feet are set. When we discuss the word "motor" he is one of the best in the class at playing hard all the time, which is a huge separation point when ranking a player.

Our updated rankings will be out next week so be sure to check in on Tate and all the other players in the 100, 60 and 25.

Paul Biancardi

Basketball Recruiting

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