One key change your league should make 

May, 24, 2012
5/24/12
2:00
PM ET
Try not to overrate pitcher wins. We preach this constantly, noting that wins are often not reflective of a pitcher's performance, and we can provide ample proof of this by looking at, among other examples, the five wins earned by Ricky Nolasco, Matt Harrison and Ubaldo Jimenez, and the misleading 4-2 mark for Boston Red Sox right-hander Clay Buchholz, who is dead last among 117 qualifiers in ERA, with a 7.84 mark (to go with a 1.91 WHIP). All that said, you must look at pitcher wins to some degree because for 99 percent of you, it's one of the five pitching categories deciding your team's season.

I participate in a league that rewards quality starts as opposed to victories, and I have to say it's far more interesting -- and rewarding -- to me. You see it on Twitter or message boards all the time when some closer like Heath Bell routinely blows a three-run lead in the ninth inning and the deserving starting pitcher is left with a no-decision, which many fantasy owners view as a fail in terms of his fantasy performance. That's not really the case; good innings are worth quite a bit, and the strikeouts don't go away. Wins just aren't predictive, and in many cases, they're not fairly distributed, either.

The quality-starts statistic is hardly perfect, but at least it's a way to enjoy a pitcher's value irrespective of how his bullpen mates perform (inherited runners notwithstanding, of course). That's why I like it. Buchholz has just one quality start this season, and even in that game, he allowed four runs, but only three were earned. That's technically a quality start, but really it wasn't!