DL Kenny Bigelow making progress 

April, 14, 2014
Apr 14
12:00
PM PT
So much has been expected from USC defensive lineman Kenny Bigelow, you’d think his name should already have been etched alongside such former Trojans D-line greats as Shaun Cody, Sedrick Ellis and Mike Patterson.

A mountain of a man at 6-foot-4 and 315 pounds, Bigelow came to Troy in the spring of 2013 with “Conquest” blaring and projections of greatness, having graduated a semester early from Elkton (Md.) Eastern Christian Academy.

A household name in recruiting circles for years, Bigelow was expected to step right in as a freshman and contribute, but sometimes those projections from the recruiting gurus don’t come to fruition.


To continue reading this article you must be an Insider

I remember the stupid things, the mood rings, the bracelets and the beads, the nickels and dimes, yours and mine. Did you cash in all your dreams?
video
REDONDO BEACH, Calif. -- At first, John Houston Jr. got a good laugh out of the fake Twitter account using his name.

The ESPN 300 linebacker was flattered, in a sense, knowing someone out there thought highly enough of him to pretend to be him. An impersonation meant all of his work on the field had earned him enough recognition.

Then, when the fake account suddenly announced a March 24 commitment to USC, Houston had a problem.


To continue reading this article you must be an Insider

video

WeAreSC's Blair Angulo caught up with Class of 2016 WR Dylan Crawford on Sunday at the IMG 7v7 West Regional to talk recruiting, and what the recent offer from USC means to him.
video

With one week remaining on USC's spring practice schedule, WeAreSC's Garry Paskwietz and Greg Katz discuss some key position battles that won't be settled until the fall.
USC coach Steve Sarkisian anticipates incoming freshman Adoree' Jackson will get looks on both sides of the ball when he arrives for fall camp.

“I think he’s going to get some [reps] at both, quite honestly,” said Sarkisian after practice on Thursday when asked if Jackson would line up on offense or defense.

Jackson, who was ranked as the No. 3 cornerback in the nation by ESPN for the Class of 2014, compiled six interceptions -- three of which were returned for touchdowns -- as a senior at Gardena (Calif.) Serra. But Jackson also averaged more than 21 yards per catch on offense, gaining more than 1,450 all-purpose yards while scoring 12 touchdowns.

During the early part of his recruitment, Jackson stated that he wanted to play wide receiver if he ended up playing for the Trojans. He had developed a good relationship with USC receivers coach Tee Martin and had watched as Robert Woods and Marqise Lee -- who both graduated from Serra -- had a lot of success at the position.

As explosive as he can potentially be on offense, Jackson is also considered to be an elite talent at cornerback. His ESPN scouting report included the following line:

“Cover corners are hard to come by, but he has the speed and skill set to develop into a fine one at the college level if he can continue to add strength and polish his technique.”

Jackson will compete with starters Josh Shaw and Kevon Seymour as well as with Chris Hawkins -- who is working with the first unit this spring while Shaw sits out with a foot injury -- for a spot in the cornerback rotation in preseason camp. There is also opportunity on offense, as Nelson Agholor is the only established returner at wide receiver.

Jabari Ruffin makes his move

April, 11, 2014
Apr 11
8:00
AM PT
Heading into the spring, USC outside linebacker Jabari Ruffin knew that he had a golden opportunity, and he was determined to seize it. A third-year sophomore with 22 tackles and one start to his credit, as he saw it, this was his time to emerge from relative obscurity into a key contributor for the Trojans.

After all, not only did he feel that he was physically prepared to take on an increased role, but a brand new 3-4 scheme was set to be unveiled by defensive coordinator Justin Wilcox, and the SAM linebacker spot that he was slated to play was wide open for the taking.

All he had to do was prove himself on the field.

And through 11 practices this March and April, that’s just what he has done.

[+] EnlargeJabari Ruffin
Kirby Lee/USA TODAY SportsSophomore linebacker Jabari Ruffin believes USC's new 3-4 scheme fits him well.
Beginning spring camp running with the No. 2 defensive unit behind Quinton Powell, Ruffin began impressing USC coach Steve Sarkisian and Co. with his play on a daily basis, so much so that over the course of the last week he actually has been lining up ahead of Powell with the No. 1 group for much of the time.

“We’re seeing him really grow as the days go,” Sarkisian said. “So, as much as we’re looking at the grand scheme of things right now, there’s individuals like a Jabari who you say, ‘Man, he’s starting to get it a little bit more, and a little bit more.’”

A big, rangy athlete who, in addition to starring at linebacker on the high school level at Downey (Calif.), also excelled as a wide receiver, Ruffin believes he has found the perfect match for his unique skill-set in the SAM linebacker position in USC’s new system.

“Not only do we get to rush off the edge, get a little blitzing going -- which is what I did last year in the old system -- but I get to cover receivers and use my speed in space,” Ruffin said.

Sarkisian agrees.

“He’s really what you’re looking for at that SAM linebacker position for us,” Sarkisian said. “He’s 6-3 and change, 240 pounds. He was a high school wide receiver that is extremely athletic for a big man, but yet he’s violent at the point of attack.”

Quick to credit USC strength and conditioning coach Ivan Lewis for the strides he has made physically over the course of the last few months, Ruffin also says he has come a long way in terms of his mental maturity -- another factor that he believes has contributed to his emergence this spring.

“I definitely changed up my work habits,” Ruffin said. “I’m taking everything slow and paying attention to detail, whether it’s studying film, or just a simple false step. So I’m definitely taking kind of a different, mature approach this season, and I feel the effects.”

Of course, it certainly doesn’t hurt to have a player like Powell competing with him, either. The talented sophomore has played an important role in helping to raise Ruffin’s game to another level, not just because he too, has shown tremendous promise this spring, but also due to the fact he’s one of Ruffin’s closest friends.

“We definitely push each other,” Ruffin said. “We hang out off the field a lot so when I’m on the field, I see a friend as well as a competitor, so it makes us both strive even more. And we’re out there on each other because at the end of the day I want to see him succeed, and he wants to see me succeed. It’s a good relationship and it’s friendly competition.”

Immersed in that ever-constant atmosphere of competition, Ruffin certainly isn’t having any trouble maintaining focus on his ultimate goal -- making a name for himself in 2014.

“It’s safe to say that this is my big season to break out here at USC,” Ruffin said. “Every day I’m just trying to get better, and obviously looking forward to a big season once fall comes, and the start of the school year, and the start of the season with Fresno State. I’m just real excited about that, and it’s just motivating me every day to work.”
And I said "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?" … Well, that's the one thing we've got.

Roundtable: Position-battle breakdown

April, 10, 2014
Apr 10
10:00
AM PT
USC coach Steve Sarkisian said he expects to name a starting quarterback before the end of spring ball. There were other position battles that took place on the field this spring, as well, and the WeAreSC staffers give their thoughts on the following competitions and who they would name as the starter.

WR opposite Nelson Agholor

Garry Paskwietz: I’ll go with Darreus Rogers right now, but I’m not going to rule out George Farmer being the starter by the season opener. Rogers has all the tools and flashes them often, but the one thing Sarkisian has noted is his inconsistency. Farmer, on the other hand, has been steadily consistent as he continues to come back from a knee injury. He is looking strong and mature right now and if his health holds up, he could make a push for the spot.

[+] EnlargeGeorge Farmer
Harry How/Getty ImagesCould former five-star prospect George Farmer be in play as a starting wide receiver?
Johnny Curren: While the performance of Farmer as of late makes this decision more difficult than anticipated, I would still give the nod to Rogers. With his combination of size, athleticism and sure hands, he really adds a unique dimension to the offense. He’s especially dangerous in the red zone -- something he showed last Thursday when he hauled in three touchdowns with the offense in close.

Greg Katz: Although Farmer and Victor Blackwell have made strides, the vote here goes to Rogers, who has made some standout plays and continues to improve on his consistency and concentration.

DE opposite Leonard Williams

GP: The Trojans have a pair of veteran options to replace George Uko in Delvon Simmons and Claudeson Pelon. Both are big, strong bodies in the middle who will contribute this year, but if I have to name a starter I will choose Pelon. He got praise from Sarkisian this week for the way his conditioning seems to be paying off, and looks to be an impressive run stuffer.

JC: Simmons is the choice here. Not only does he possess 6-foot-6, 300-pound size, but what has impressed me most this spring is his quickness, and perhaps most of all, his stamina -- something Pelon and Kenny Bigelow appeared to struggle with at times. When you throw Simmons into a lineup that will also include Williams and an improved Antwaun Woods, there’s reason to believe that the Trojans will have one of the nation’s most formidable starting defensive line units in 2014.

GK: Simmons is the choice, having shown his experience of having already played for two seasons at Texas Tech. Simmons, while still striving for consistency on a play-by-play basis, is big and talented and has shown the most progress, which hasn’t been entirely unexpected.

SAM linebacker

GP: There are two really good options with a lot of upside in Quinton Powell and Jabari Ruffin. I would have said Powell at the start of spring, and while he didn’t do anything to lose the spot in my mind, Ruffin has showed me a little more. Any way you look at it, the Trojans are fine here.

JC: This is the toughest one to choose because Powell and Ruffin have each been stellar this spring. Still, if I have to pick one, it’s Powell. An explosive athlete with strong football instincts and the length that the USC coaches look for at SAM linebacker, Powell is really the total package. I think he has the potential to develop into a difference-maker down the line, and I can’t wait to see what he does in 2014.

GK: With Scott Starr having been moved to rush end, it’s a battle between Powell and Ruffin. Powell has the quickness and the attitude, but as Sarkisian recently pointed out, Ruffin is one heck of an athletic who really brings a physical game. I’ll go with Powell for the moment, but the way Ruffin is improving, Powell better do the same if he wants to hold on to the position.

CB opposite Josh Shaw

GP: Kevon Seymour is the choice, and he should be, but I don’t think you can rule out the possibility of Adoree' Jackson making a run in the fall. Chris Hawkins has stepped up his game to the point where he is in the mix too.

JC: A more refined and physically mature Hawkins certainly proved himself to a certain extent this spring, but I’d still give the edge to Seymour here. Not only has he had a solid spring, but with 11 starts under his belt, he has the undeniable edge in experience. I’d need to see more of Hawkins in fall camp before I’d be comfortable putting him ahead of Seymour, who is coming off the best performance of his career in the Las Vegas Bowl against Fresno State.

GK: There is no reason not to start Seymour, who had an outstanding performance in the Las Vegas Bowl. However, like Ruffin and Powell, the competition gap is closing, and look for Hawkins to continue his quest to unseat Seymour.

A look at USC's rehabbing players

April, 10, 2014
Apr 10
7:12
AM PT
LOS ANGELES -- They observe in jerseys, and for those who can, they participate in controlled spring conditioning drills, walk-throughs, and mental preparation. Some even walk the steep steps of the Coliseum from bottom to top and back down again.

But no matter what they do, USC's walking wounded aren’t remotely in the same condition as their healthy brethren, who are fit enough to stretch the limits of their physical being in Steve Sarkisian’s nonstop practice pace.

[+] EnlargeJustin Davis
AP Photo/Rick ScuteriJustin Davis isn't a factor this spring, but his work ethic and motor will help him be ready for fall camp.
Sarkisian, USC's first-year head coach, is a great believer in muscle memory, which basically means one learns from doing rather than watching. In his incredibly fast paced, no-huddle offense and rotating defense, muscle memory must also go hand-in-hand with muscle conditioning.

Despite watching their teammates practice and condition at a pace not seen on Howard Jones/Brian Kennedy Fields, there is an uneasiness that come regular season camp, in the heat of summer, the currently rehabilitating players could be in for a major conditioning shock.

Sarkisian feels that his available players in spring ball are now rounding into the type of shape needed for the regular season, and spring ball has been a catalyst to being in the type of condition needed for fall competition.

“That’s why we practice the way that we do,” Sarkisian said. “That’s why we make it as hard we can throughout practice. This prepares our guys for a game-like atmosphere.”

Come practice in August, Sarkisian expects his healthy players to return ready to go from a conditioning standpoint, and he also knows the conditioning challenge is even more pronounced for those rehabbing.

“The guys [who] are injured have their work cut out for them when they get back,” Sarkisian said.

Here are six rehabilitating players being held out of spring ball (for the most part) who are expected to be key contributors in 2014. They all will be faced with the challenge of getting into “Sarkisian shape” by early August:

• RB Justin Davis: Given the sophomore’s early track record of success on and off the field, Davis -- who suffered a season-ending broken ankle in 2013 -- figures to be ready with an indisputable work ethic and relentless motor. Expect him to enter fall camp in top condition.

• LB Lamar Dawson: Recovering from a left knee injury, this senior will not only battle junior Anthony Sarao for his starting inside linebacker position, but he will have to be in the type of shape that Sarao knows all too well. Sarao has really come on and plays with a high motor and intelligence, so Dawson has his work cut out for him in more ways than one.

• WR Steven Mitchell: The redshirt freshman is an electrifying player when healthy. Recovering from tearing ligaments in his right knee during the summer of 2013, Mitchell says he is still on the mend but expects to be in ready to go in August. A hard worker, the former Bishop Alemany star’s return would be a major addition for the currently ultra-thin receiving corps.

• OG Jordan Simmons: With his size (6-foot-4, 335) and the pace of the offense, will the sophomore be able to come into camp in the type of shape needed for the no-huddle offense? Simmons, recovering from knee surgery, could very well be a key and the final piece of the offensive line. So far Simmons is still potential and an unproven talent.

• TE Randall Telfer: With Xavier Grimble leaving early for the NFL draft, it appeared that Telfer would step right in. The senior might still do so, but he has been held out of spring ball with a knee issue, and his absence has opened the way for an impressive March and April by junior Jalen Cope-Fitzpatrick. It would behoove Telfer to be in the best condition of his Trojans career to hold off Cope-Fitzpatrick and the incoming presence of true freshman talent Bryce Dixon.

• OG Aundrey Walker: There are those both within the team and onlookers who say that Walker, now a senior, has the talent. But does he have the motivation? The Ohio native has spent spring practice observing and going through “soft” drills, but one wonders how the 6-foot-6, 300-pound guard will cope with the physical and mental conditioning demands to play in Sarkisian’s never-take-a-breath offense.
1. When USC finished practice Tuesday, center Max Tuerk and quarterback Cody Kessler stayed behind to work on snaps. Tuerk, a junior, has started 14 games at guard and six at tackle. But the Trojans need a center, so he’s learning the position this spring. He learned to tape his fingers -- two rings of tape on two fingers, one ring of tape on the other two -- and to carry a towel, all to keep sweat off the ball. He has learned to stay lower and, as he put it, get his feet in the ground faster. “The more reps you take, you don’t have to think about the snap as much,” Tuerk said. “You can think about the blocks.”

2. UCLA quarterback Brett Hundley is working more under center this spring. “It’s different,” the redshirt junior said. “Being under center and being in the shotgun are two different views. When you are under center, you are right there. ... You have to take your seven-step drop, push up in the pocket while keeping your shoulders (level).” If Hundley has a peccadillo, it is maintaining the balance of his shoulders. UCLA coach Jim Mora said he wants to work Hundley under center to expand the offense. If it helps Hundley in the 2015 NFL draft, even better.

3. Stanford wide receiver Jordan Pratt will be 29 years old when the football season begins. He enrolled after spending eight seasons pitching in the Dodgers’ minor-league system. “I’ll make a comment, ‘Yeah, I remember, Sept. 11, 2001, I got called out of my high school class,’” Pratt said. His teammates respond, “‘High school? I don’t even remember that. I was in preschool.’ There is this time gap. Sometimes I relate better to the TAs in my class than I do the other students. It’s a lot easier for me to talk to the professors. It’s a little easier for them to relate, too.”
As he has done the past five seasons, ESPN contributor Phil Steele takes a crack at projecting the preseason AP Top 25 Insider.

Steele has been pretty solid the last couple of years -- picking all 25 ranked teams in consecutive seasons. If he’s projecting your team, chances are they’ll be the list. He notes that this isn’t his personal preseason ranking, but rather his projection of how the AP will likely vote.

The Pac-12 is represented with Oregon at No. 3 and UCLA at No. 7 and three other teams in the projected Top 25.

Steele on Oregon:
While the Ducks, under new head coach Mark Helfrich, failed to make a BCS bowl for the first time in five seasons in 2013, they still managed their sixth-straight season with double-digit wins. This year they return 15 starters, led by quarterback Marcus Mariota, who is clearly one of the Heisman favorites heading into 2014. The biggest question might be how they adjust to long-time defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti's retirement. However, they do return linebacker Derrick Malone, their leading tackler, and Ifo Ekpre-Olomu could be the best cornerback in the country.

Stanford and USC check in at 12 and 14, respectively, and Washington rounds out the group at No. 22.

He raises an interesting point regarding the Cardinal:
The biggest question for the Cardinal in 2014, however, is how they will navigate one of the toughest schedules in the country: Stanford plays Washington, Notre Dame, Arizona State, Oregon and UCLA --- all on the road.

The Pac-12 finished up 2013 with six teams ranked in the Top 25. ASU is the only team that was ranked to close the season that isn’t projected by Steele. But the Sun Devils are likely to receive some votes and have a chance to slip into the Top 25 in the first couple of weeks with a softer schedule. But then it ramps up for ASU with four straight games against teams in Steele’s projections, starting off with a home date against UCLA. Recall the last couple of seasons that game has essentially decided the Pac-12 South title, and the road team has won in consecutive years. Then ASU is at USC, home to Stanford and at Washington.

Arizona ended the season receiving votes and should start out 4-0 (vs. UNLV, at UTSA, vs. Nevada, vs. California). Then the Wildcats have back-to-back games against Oregon (in Eugene, can you say revenge game?) and home to USC. A 4-0 start and a win in either of those games keeps the Wildcats in the Top 25.

Oregon State may receive a few votes as well -- though voters will likely be timid with the Beavers considering how last season started. Still, with three projected nonconference wins (vs. Portland State, at Hawaii, vs. San Diego State) the Beavers should be undefeated heading into conference play at USC. A 4-0 start and a win over USC would go a long way toward getting OSU in the Top 25.
Max Browne likely knows what's going on.

You can see it in his eyes. You can read it in his body language. As much as he wants it to be different, he understands.


To continue reading this article you must be an Insider

Pac-12's lunch links

April, 9, 2014
Apr 9
2:30
PM PT
If I owned the Twins, I wouldn't even show up here. I'd just hire a bunch of scientists to do my homework. I mean, if you're rich you don't have to be smart. That's the whole beauty of this country.

SPONSORED HEADLINES