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Thursday, May 9, 2013
2015 OG Vahe talks Longhorns offer

By Damon Sayles

Patrick Vahe (Euless, Texas/Trinity) thought it was a joke at first.

There Vahe was, a 6-foot-3, 280-pound sophomore offensive lineman with tons of untapped talent but possessing zero offers and minimal looks from colleges. Why would the Texas Longhorns be interested in having him become a part of their 2015 class?

“Honestly, I took it as a prank,” Vahe said. “I mean, the Texas Longhorns? Me? No, I didn’t see that coming.

“But when I went into my coach’s office, I couldn’t believe it. I mean, it was really happening.”

Vahe’s Wednesday turned into one of his most memorable as a football player. His first offer was from Texas, a school that he had followed for several years, a program he’d said he could see himself playing for if given the opportunity.

“My family grew up Texas fans,” Vahe said. “I remember seeing them go all the way [in 2005]. I put it as a goal of mine that one day, if I’m lucky, I’ll get to play there. Now, I can say that a dream could possibly come true.”

Vahe, an offensive guard, said he first got the word that Texas was interested in him during the second week of spring football. The Longhorns were in town, and Vahe’s mission was to put on a show for the coaching staff.

Things began to pick up for Vahe when he was able to speak with Mack Brown, who gave him the news.

“He said he was building his offensive line, and he wanted someone big and fast,” Vahe said of Brown. “He said he liked what he saw in me. It gave me butterflies.”

While Vahe said he is very interested in playing for the Longhorns, he’s also willing to take his time with his recruiting process. He currently has interest from Vanderbilt, and as he continues spring ball and continues to work through the summer, he’s hoping to vastly improve his stock.

One thing Vahe won’t do is make a rushed decision. He also plans on factoring in academics, as he is a solid A and B student. With two years of high school still remaining, recruiting will continue to take a back seat to what he does in the classroom.

“Speaking with my parents, school is first; there’s nothing above it,” Vahe said. “I’m taking a shot at waiting until my senior year to make a decision. If I let the offers get in the way, it could mean my grades slip. That’s the last thing I want.”