Versatile Everett a bright spot on Aggies' D

October, 7, 2013
10/07/13
3:00
PM ET
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -- Texas A&M's defense struggled through much of the Aggies' first five games, trying to find consistency as personnel has shifted as a result of suspensions (in the first two games), injuries or simply the youth and inexperience that permeates the two-deep depth chart.

But it hasn't been all bad, and there have been some bright spots through the early stages of the season -- perhaps none as bright as defensive back Deshazor Everett.

The junior cornerback/safety has been many things for the Aggies this season: steady, versatile, a source of leadership, a playmaker. Defensive coordinator Mark Snyder called him "an eraser," which seems appropriate since Everett has made a touchdown-saving tackle or two this season.

One thing Everett hasn't been all year is two-handed. Well, sort of.

[+] EnlargeDeshazor Everett
AP Photo/Bob LeveyCornerback/safety Deshazor Everett has been one of the bright spots on the Texas A&M defense.
The 6-foot, 185-pound Everett broke the thumb on his right hand during preseason training camp, but hasn't missed any game time as a result. He played with a cast throughout the first five games but Everett is happy to say that when the Aggies (4-1, 1-1 SEC) go to Oxford, Miss., on Saturday to meet the Rebels (3-2, 1-2), he plans to play cast-free for the first time this season.

"Oh yes, definitely," Everett said with a smile, "I'll have two hands in that game."

So far, it hasn't hindered his play much at all. In fact, Everett scored a defensive touchdown in each of the last two games. In the Aggies' 42-13 win over SMU on Sept. 21, Everett had a 12-yard fumble return for a touchdown. On Sept. 28 against Arkansas, he stepped in front of a Brandon Allen pass and returned an interception 34 yards for a score, which proved critical in the Aggies' 45-33 win that day.

"I can't wait until he gets that cast off, then maybe he'll score twice in a game," head coach Kevin Sumlin said.

On a defense that has seen players go in and out of the lineup for myriad reasons and is trying to find its footing after a horrendous start (the Aggies are 112th nationally in yards allowed per game), Everett is a bright light and someone the coaching staff can rely on in multiple roles.

Though he's the team's best cornerback, Snyder and secondary coach Marcel Yates elected to shift Everett back to free safety to alleviate some concerns they had with the back end of the defense. The results since the switch have been positive.

"He understands what we're trying to do," Sumlin said. "He's playing out of position really, because he's our best corner. We move him, you give up something, you think, he's also one of our better DBs and gives us speed back in the back and has saved some touchdowns this year, no doubt. And has given us the opportunity to line up and play defense again and I can't tell you how critical that's been."

Everett is second on the team with 31 tackles and also has two tackles for loss, two interceptions and a pass breakup in addition to his two defensive touchdowns. Against Arkansas, cornerback Tramain Jacobs -- who assumed Everett's cornerback position with Everett at safety -- performed admirably and will be a key player for the Aggies as they continue to buy time until starting free safety Floyd Raven returns from a collarbone injury.

"I'm the first one to take my hat off; I thought he played well," Snyder said of Jacobs. "They went after him and targeted him, they continued to target him and they're going to target him again next Saturday. And I thought he really rose to the occasion."

Everett had two pins put in his thumb after breaking it, and if it was up to him, he wouldn't have even come off the practice field when it occurred in August. He recalled asking a trainer if it could simply be taped up on the spot so he could continue practicing, but he was told no, he had to get X-rays on it.

"I couldn't move it and it was just hanging there," Everett said. "I just wanted to keep playing basically. I didn't want, just because of a little injury, [to not] continue practicing. I could practice without my thumb or play without my thumb. People have played with injuries before. It was just a small injury for me."

The DeRidder, La., product attributes his tough attitude to being undersized and hanging with bigger kids growing up, being "pushed around" so he could be toughened up. In addition to his toughness and solid play, he has been willing to do anything. Sumlin referenced Everett's willingness to play on special teams when the Aggies needed him, spending time on kickoff return units when asked.

"He just goes in there and does it and runs back off the field because he wants to win," Sumlin said.

Sam Khan | email

Texas A&M/SEC reporter

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