Penn State Nittany Lions: Bill Belton

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- The first week of Penn State’s spring practice is underway so a lot of eyes will be on different position battles and rising starters. But what about those under-the-radar players?

Every year, coach James Franklin said there are at least one or two surprise players who jump into the spotlight. So here’s a look at five current backups who could make an impact:

1. RB Akeel Lynch
2013 stats: 9 games played, 60 carries, 358 yards, 1 TD
Currently behind: Zach Zwinak, Bill Belton

[+] EnlargeAkeel Lynch
Randy Litzinger/Icon SMIAkeel Lynch is primed to have a breakout season for Penn State.
Synopsis: He’s on quite a few reporters’ breakout lists this fall -- and for good reason. He has made an impression every time he has received a sizable workload. He was the star of the spring scrimmage in 2013, rushing 13 times for 83 yards, and he twice surpassed the 100-yard mark during the nonconference season. He’s a speedy runner who clocked a 4.48-second 40 last spring, and he could evolve into a nice spark plug. He needs to become more well-rounded, as he saw limited time last season due to blocking and similar concerns. However, he’s clearly excellent at carrying the ball.

Running backs coach Charles Huff said in January that a good system needs three good options on the ground. So Lynch will see an increased workload, and Franklin will have the ability to discover whether he has the talent to be the primary ball-carrier in 2015.

2. DE Brad Bars
2013 stats: Missed season due to injury
Currently behind: C.J. Olaniyan, Deion Barnes

Synopsis: Bars stood inside the Lasch Building last February and told the media that he felt 2013 would be a breakout year for him. He felt he could start or, at the very least, contribute heavily. But in July, Bars ruptured his Achilles’ tendon and was forced to miss the season. Franklin has repeatedly declined to address such injuries, but Bars’ initial rehabilitation plan was expected to end -- at the latest -- sometime in January. And the senior seemed fine on Monday when he sprinted during drills and took direction from the staff.

Bars won’t end up as a starter in 2014, but he could still see considerable playing time. Defensive line coach Sean Spencer likes to utilize a lot of different looks and rotations, and Franklin once again alluded to a scheme that would sometimes feature four defensive ends. With Anthony Zettel moving inside on a permanent basis, the Nittany Lions need some quality depth -- and Bars could be that answer. It might turn out that his prediction was just a year off.

3. S Malik Golden
2013 stats: 12 games played, 8 tackles, 1 pass breakup
Currently behind: Adrian Amos, Ryan Keiser

Synopsis: There are two ways this could go for Golden, and either way is significant. The redshirt sophomore could challenge Keiser for playing time this season -- or he could lose out. But, even if he doesn’t start, this season is no less important for his future. Both Amos and Keiser are seniors, so Penn State will need someone to step up in 2015.

There are plenty of freshman safeties enrolling over the summer, but Golden will obviously be the most experienced of that crew. He’s in a somewhat similar situation as Lynch, in that his play this season will determine whether he’s a future starter or just a career backup. He appears to be the next man up at safety, though, so he will see the field in 2014 -- it’s just a matter of how much and whether he can challenge Keiser.

4. CB Jordan Smith
2013 stats: 12 games played, 5 tackles
Currently behind: Jordan Lucas, Trevor Williams

Synopsis: Williams may be the projected starter at cornerback for now, but this position battle is far from decided. Lucas has taken Smith under his wing, not unlike Stephon Morris did for him, and Smith isn’t afraid to work. When he battled with insomnia in high school, he often did a couple hundred push-ups to pass the time. Also, it didn’t hurt that he trained with former NFL great Troy Vincent, either.

He wasn’t ready for a big role as a true freshman last season, but he’s definitely a player to watch as a sophomore. And he has the potential to follow in Lucas’ footsteps. As a sophomore, Lucas beat out a more-experienced player (Da’Quan Davis) for the starting job. Now, as a sophomore himself, Smith is hoping for the same.

5. OT Albert Hall
2013 stats: 5 games played
Currently behind: Donovan Smith, Andrew Nelson

Synopsis: Hall isn't just on this list because he’ll see a lot of playing time this season, or even in the future. There's more to him. He’s a converted tight end and a walk-on and is one of just four offensive tackles currently on the roster, and Franklin offered him a lot of praise on Monday.

“That guy is going to find a role on this team somehow,” Franklin said. "I’ve called him out in front of the team a number of times because I’ve been so impressed with him: His approach, his demeanor, his attitude.”

Hall should, at the very least, be an important member of the scout team -- and will likely see plenty of time on special teams. It’s not necessarily Hall's play that’s going to be important to this team. It’s the intangibles. There are a lot of walk-ons on this team, and Franklin only singled out Hall. So he’s definitely worth a second look.
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- We’ve finally reached the end of this week’s countdown, which involves five predictions for the spring.

Up today is a look at who’s going to step up into a leadership role …

[+] EnlargeJordan Lucas
Zuma Press/Icon SMIThe evolution of Jordan Lucas' game at Penn State has been evident.
CB Jordan Lucas emerges as the defense’s vocal leader

Jordan Lucas lacked confidence as a freshman. His friend and teammate, Stephon Morris, knew it. His father knew it. And he knew it.

But when Morris graduated, Lucas stepped up as a sophomore and put together the strongest season out of the defensive backs. (Sorry, Adrian Amos fans, those games at safety didn’t help.) Lucas is a charismatic person, not unlike his head coach, and his evolution has been pretty evident.

If there was any doubt about his work ethic or his confidence, that was put to rest in the last month. Not only did Bill Belton name Lucas as one of the team’s hardest workers last October, but strength coach Dwight Galt also praised the corner about a week ago for being a gym rat.

As for that confidence? Fans were treated to a glimpse of that during a memorable exchange at coach James Franklin’s signing day pep rally. Lucas was handed the microphone and skipped the usual “Thanks-for-coming” cliché by turning to PSU great LaVar Arrington and asking the crowd, “LaVar said it’s What-U?”

“LBU,” Arrington responded.

“You guys like that, LBU?” Lucas asked. “What about LBU and DBU?”

Lucas carried himself well, while Arrington and Franklin joked about the light-hearted exchange. “Jordan likes the microphone,” Franklin said. Added Arrington: “Jordan came out with his muscles and his tattoos, and he lost his mind.”

Safety Malcolm Willis was regarded as the secondary’s leader last season, and middle linebacker Glenn Carson stepped into a team leadership role. With those two gone, a new leader has to emerge -- and Lucas certainly seems ready for the role. Both Amos and Ryan Keiser aren’t very vocal, so the secondary needs someone in that department. And, as the defense searches for someone new to help lead, Lucas isn’t one to shy away from the task.

More predictions:

No. 5: A more public, eager-to-please coach
No. 4: Blue-White attendance more than doubles from 2013
No. 3: OL struggles surpass secondary as biggest concern
No. 2: Tarow Barney and De'Andre Thompkins make immediate impact
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- We’ve reached the middle of this week’s countdown, which involves five predictions for the spring.

Up Wednesday is an issue that has been talked about a lot but is even more serious than it seems ...

OL struggles surpass secondary as biggest concern

Forget about the offensive line’s three new starters for a moment. Forget about the fact Penn State will likely start two redshirt freshmen, Andrew Nelson and Brendan Mahon, who have never played in a college game. And forget about the fact they’ll all be learning new schemes from a new assistant coach.

That’s all been talked about before. But take a closer look at this lack of depth; just look at the second-string offensive line. This should be the most this unit struggles since at least the "dark years" of the early 2000s.

[+] EnlargeLarry Johnson, Derek Dowrey
Matthew O'Haren/USA TODAY SportsFormer Penn State assistant Larry Johnson talks with Derek Dowrey during the 2013 spring game. Dowrey might be moving to the offensive line, where there's a big need for players.
Backups Wendy Laurent and Anthony Alosi have had very limited playing time, playing in 16 combined contests but receiving even less experience than that number suggests. And that’s the strong part of this backup offensive line. The other three spots this spring will be taken up by an early enrollee (Chasz Wright) and two walk-on underclassmen. The defensive line should dominate in the Blue-White Game.

That’s not to say the weakness with this unit is just depth; inexperience is the biggest issue among the starters. But that’s been pretty well documented. The mess behind them hasn’t been.

More position switches are bound to happen -- defensive tackle Derek Dowrey has already been linked to a move to the offensive line, contrary to the updated published roster -- and the big problem with this line is that it’s one injury away from disaster. It’s akin to the linebacker issue last season except this might be even worse. Safety Stephen Obeng-Agyapong was able to briefly make up for his size at linebacker with his speed, but there’s no hiding a weak link on the offensive line.

If Mahon or Nelson falters, this line falters. If one of the five starters suffers an injury, this line falters. With Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak returning, this is the best stable of running backs that Penn State has fielded in at least three seasons, and Christian Hackenberg has one of the strongest arms in Penn State history. But that won’t mean much if this line can’t jell by August. And while this staff tries to figure it all out this spring, it’s not going to be pretty.

More help will come over the summer in the form of three more signees, but this line will undoubtedly struggle even then. Still, it won’t get any worse than it will this spring.

More predictions:

No. 5: A more public, eager-to-please coach
No. 4: Blue-White attendance more than doubles from 2013

Spring position breakdown: RBs

February, 26, 2014
Feb 26
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Spring practice is off and running in the Big Ten, as Michigan took the field Tuesday and Northwestern followed on Wednesday. We're taking snapshots of where each team stands at each position group.

We've already discussed the quarterbacks -- and will have much more on the way -- so the series begins with the running backs.

Illinois: The Illini are in a bit better shape here than they were the past two springs, as veterans Josh Ferguson and Donovonn Young both return. Ferguson averaged 5.5 yards per carry and added 50 receptions for 535 yards as the primary playmaker for Illinois' revamped offense. Young added 376 yards on 93 carries. The Illini are looking for others behind the top two, and Dami Ayoola is back with the team after being dismissed in September for a rules violation.

Indiana: Tevin Coleman quietly put together a superb sophomore season and leads the Hoosiers' running backs in 2014. Coleman provides big-play ability after averaging 7.3 yards per carry with 12 touchdowns on only 131 attempts in 2013. Indiana loses Stephen Houston but brings back veteran D'Angelo Roberts, who will play behind Coleman. Younger players such as sophomore Laray Smith could get a look here.

Iowa: Not only did the Hawkeyes toss AIRBHG to the side and get through the season without any major injurie, but they bring back everyone for 2014. Senior Mark Weisman leads the contingent after rushing for 975 yards and eight touchdowns last fall. Jordan Canzeri came on strong late in the season and is showing no effects from his ACL tear in 2012. Veteran Damon Bullock also returns to the mix, and Iowa has talented younger backs such as LeShun Daniels Jr. at its disposal. Good situation here.

Maryland: The Terrapins wide receivers tend to get more attention, but the team also returns its top three running backs from 2013 in Brandon Ross, Albert Reid and Jacquille Veii. Maryland also regains the services of Wes Brown, who finished second on the team in rushing as a freshman in 2012 before being suspended for all of last season. Joe Riddle is back in the fold as well. The group brings different strengths, from power (Brown) to speed (Veii) to a mixture of both (Ross, Reid).

Michigan: Sophomore Derrick Green enters the spring as the frontrunner to be Michigan's lead back, although coach Brady Hoke wants to ramp up competition everywhere. The Wolverines struggled to consistently run between the tackles, but the 240-pound Green could change things. Hoke also is excited about another sophomore, De'Veon Smith. Michigan moved Ross Douglas from cornerback to running back, and Justice Hayes and Wyatt Shallman also are in the mix. "We've got more depth," Hoke said.

Michigan State: Things look much more promising than they did last spring, when the Spartans ended the session with a linebacker (Riley Bullough) as their top back. Jeremy Langford emerged as a very solid option during the season, rushing for 1,422 yards and 18 touchdowns. He's back as the clear-cut starter, and Nick Hill also returns. It will be interesting to see if Gerald Holmes makes a push, or whether Delton Williams remains on offense.

Minnesota: Here's another team that finds itself in very good shape at running back entering the spring. David Cobb leads the group after rushing for 1,202 yards and seven touchdowns as a sophomore. Veterans Donnell Kirkwood and Rodrick Williams Jr. are still around, and highly touted redshirt freshman Berkley Edwards will take the field after missing last fall because of knee and ankle injuries. Perhaps the best news will come in the summer as decorated recruit Jeff Jones arrives.

Nebraska: Notice a theme here? Nebraska is yet another Big Ten squad that can feel very good about its running backs entering the spring. Ameer Abdullah elected to bypass the NFL draft for one final season at Nebraska, where he led the Big Ten with 1,690 yards on 281 carries as a junior. Abdullah will contend for national awards in the fall. Imani Cross, who rushed for 10 touchdowns last year, is one of the nation's top backups. Terrell Newby and others add depth behind the top two.

Northwestern: Top back Venric Mark (ankle) will miss spring practice following surgery, and reserve Stephen Buckley (knee) also is rehabbing, but Northwestern has no reason to panic. Treyvon Green, who filled in well for Mark last season with 736 rushing yards, will get much of the work. Warren Long also is in the mix after appearing in seven games as a true freshman. Northwestern also loaded up at running back in recruiting to solidify the position for years to come.

Ohio State: This will be a position to watch in the spring as Ohio State must replace Carlos Hyde, who was nearly unstoppable during Big Ten play last fall. Veteran Jordan Hall also departs, and Rod Smith will be the veteran of the group despite only 83 career carries. The Buckeyes have some talented young backs, from Dontre Wilson, who saw significant playing time last fall, to Bri'onte Dunn, Ezekiel Elliott and Warren Ball. Keep an eye on Elliott, who averaged 8.7 yards per carry in limited work last season but could emerge this spring.

Penn State: If it feels like Zach Zwinak and Bill Belton have been competing for carries forever at Penn State, it's because they have. Zwinak and Belton have been part of Penn State's running back rotation for the past two seasons and enter another competition this spring with talented sophomore Akeel Lynch, who rushed for 358 yards on only 60 carries last season. It will be interesting to see how much Lynch can push Zwinak and Belton in the team's first spring under a new coaching staff. Penn State has depth issues at several positions, but running back isn't one of them.

Purdue: The Boilers finished 122nd nationally in rushing offense last season, so the fact all of their running backs return might not spark mass celebration. Senior Akeem Hunt leads the group after recording 123 of the team's 319 rushing attempts in 2013. Other veteransBrandon Cottom and Raheem Mostert also are back, along with younger ball-carries such as Dayln Dawkins and three backs -- Keyante Green, David Yancey and Keith Byars II -- who redshirted last fall and could have much bigger roles.

Rutgers: Here's yet another team that returns basically its entire stable of running backs for spring ball. Paul James is the name to watch, as he rushed for 573 yards in the first four games last season before suffering a leg injury. James' health is a concern for Rutgers, which could also turn to Justin Goodwin, who showed some flashes following James' injury. Savon Huggins, who entered last season as the starter before losing ground, is in the mix as he looks to re-establish himself on the depth chart.

Wisconsin: How many teams can lose a 1,400-yard rusher and still claim to have the best running back group in the Big Ten? James White is gone, but Wisconsin remains in very good shape in the backfield. Melvin Gordon bypassed the NFL draft for another year in Madison after rushing for 1,609 yards and 12 touchdowns on only 206 carries. Gordon should move into more of a featured role beginning this spring, although he'll be pushed by Corey Clement, who had 547 yards and seven touchdowns on only 67 carries. Jeff Lewis provides another option behind the top two.
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Spring practice is still several weeks away, so we're bringing you a different countdown every week to try to make that time tick a little faster.

This week's countdown involves a look back at the past decade of recruiting classes, from 2004 on, and figuring out the five most impactful groups. Up today is a more recent class, so the names here will definitely ring a bell ...

No. 5 most impactful class: Class of 2011

Top prospects: DB Adrian Amos, DE Deion Barnes, RB Bill Belton, TE Kyle Carter, LB Ben Kline, OG Angelo Mangiro, WR Allen Robinson, OT Donovan Smith, DL Anthony Zettel

[+] EnlargeAllen Robinson
AP Photo/John BealeAllen Robinson came to Penn State as a two-star prospect. He left as one of the greatest wide receivers in school history.
Biggest surprise: Robinson. He came in as a two-star prospect with the second-lowest grade of the class, behind only OL Anthony Alosi. Three years later, he's leaving Penn State early as one of its greatest wide receivers ever. He set the single-season school records for both catches (97) and yards (1,432), and accounted for more than 46 percent of the Nittany Lions' passing offense in 2013. He was the team's best player this past season and the offense's top threat in 2012.

Impact player: Besides Robinson? Amos. There's some good variety to choose from here -- hence why this class is No. 5 -- and, although Amos struggled some as a sophomore, he's still the team's most athletic defensive back. He's going to finish his career as a four-year starter and, if he sticks with cornerback or starts off hot at safety, he should bounce back from that sophomore "slump." He's got a high ceiling and has the ability to to be an All-Big Ten player.

Why the class is important: Depth was not a strength for PSU in 2012 or 2013, and this class hit just where it needed to when it needed to. Take a look at who's currently behind some of the key players from this class. Imagine a 2013 receiving corps without Robinson or a 2013 offensive line that was forced to start Adam Gress and Garry Gilliam every game. How about a 2012 secondary led by Stephon Morris and ... Da'Quan Davis? Or a defensive line without Barnes and Zettel? If this class was a bust like 2010, the Nittany Lions would not have bounced back quite so strongly after the sanctions.

This was the class of the "Supa Six," and although that nickname's now gone along with A-Rob, there are plenty of players who'll turn out to be three- or four-year starters. Amos, Barnes, Carter and Smith are among them. This wasn't a flashy class when it signed -- only two ESPN 150 prospects were included -- but it's more than made up for that with its production and potential.

Penn State positions to improve: No. 2

February, 13, 2014
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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- We've arrived at the top two in our countdown of the positions with the biggest question marks for Penn State.

The top pick will be unveiled Friday. But up today is a group that wouldn't be a bad choice for No. 1 either ...

No. 2: Offensive line

[+] EnlargeMiles Dieffenbach
AP Photo/Gene J. PuskarMiles Dieffenbach (65) is one of Penn State's veterans along the O-line.
The players: Donovan Smith (10 starts), Miles Dieffenbach (11 starts), Angelo Mangiro (11 games played), Andrew Nelson (redshirted), Brendan Mahon (redshirted), Wendy Laurent (five games played), Anthony Alosi (six games played), Tanner Hartman (one game played), Chasz Wright (early enrollee), Noah Beh (incoming freshman), Brendan Brosnan (incoming freshman), Chance Sorrell (incoming freshman)

Last season: This group started off slow and struggled picking up the heavy blitz, but it really improved as the season wore on. Tailbacks Zach Zwinak and Bill Belton combined for just two 100-yard rushing performances in the first seven games but finished the last five games with five -- and Penn State even outplayed Wisconsin's mammoth line in the finale. John Urschel was a first-team All-Big Ten selection, while three substitutes -- Garry Gilliam, Eric Shrive and Mangiro -- saw considerable time.

What's missing: Experience and depth. Eight players saw a lot of time last season and five are now gone. PSU has just one returning offensive tackle on scholarship with any kind of game experience, and new coach James Franklin will be forced to plug in two rookies on the starting line. Health is obviously paramount here.

Moving forward: Former coach Bill O'Brien raved about Nelson, who redshirted last season as a freshman, and Nelson will almost certainly take over the starting right tackle position. There's really no one else to consider, outside of incoming freshmen and walk-ons. But the big question comes from the interior. At guard and/or center, Dieffenbach and Mangiro will be a part of some kind of combination, but there's no telling who else fits into Franklin's plans. Laurent could be the center. Or Mangiro could take over that position and Franklin could slide in Mahon at one of the guard positions. Or maybe Franklin decides to move a defensive tackle to the offensive side of the ball. There are a lot of moving pieces right now, and a lot has to go right for this group to start off smoothly. The question marks surrounding this position likely won't be answered by Week 1.

Big Ten Wednesday mailbag

January, 29, 2014
Jan 29
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Coming at you from the United Mailbaggers Local 40205 …

David from Nashville writes: All Players United! Well except walk-ons, that is. I'm sorry, but Kain Colter is losing me. Personally, I completely understand wanting medical coverage for football injuries sustained while representing the university. But excluding walk-ons from having a ”'voice at the table,” as Colter calls it? Do they not sustain injuries, get concussions or have medical bills? And they don't even get the free education from a very prestigious, and expensive, school like Northwestern! Or perhaps, just like the NCAA, Kain Colter just wants “his,” and including your walk-on teammates will hurt his legal argument to get “his.”

Brian Bennett: Clearly, there are more questions than answers right now about the Northwestern labor union movement. Can students at a university really be classified as "employees?" How would such a union arrangement work with Title IX? How long would medical benefits last, and who would decide whether a former player's injury was football-related?

The issue of walk-ons is another one, although a minor point, in my opinion. Only those who are receiving scholarships can really argue that they are being compensated like an employee, and any walk-on who plays enough to merit post-career benefits would likely be put on scholarship at some point. It's also not fair to say Colter is looking to "get his" when he has already completed his eligibility and likely would not see any personal gain from leading this movement. On the contrary, he's risking a lot by agreeing to become the public face of this movement.

I question whether a labor union is the right way for the players to go, and it certainly was odd to see college football players standing alongside steelworkers' union members at Tuesday's news conference. But I also think it's way past time for players to organize in some way and make sure their rights and concerns are being considered. College football is a multibillion-dollar industry that's only going to get richer with the new playoff system, and everybody from head coaches to assistants to athletic directors are getting rich off the sport. Everybody except the players, who put their bodies at risk for our enjoyment, that is.

Yes, the players receive scholarships, and at a place like Northwestern, the value of that can exceed $250,000 over the course of a player's career. But the players in this movement aren't asking for cash. They're asking for things such as medical treatment beyond their playing days, better concussion prevention and care and a trust fund that can allow players to continue their schooling following their careers. (Many of their demands, by the way, are not that different from Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany's own collegiate reform plan). Mostly, they are asking for a larger voice and a seat at the table in a system that too often treats them like disposable indentured servants. That seems a highly reasonable request to me.


[+] EnlargeAmeer Abdullah
Rick Osentoski/USA TODAY SportsNebraska's Ameer Abdullah is a good role model for running backs looking to improve next season.
Zach from Southgate, Mich., writes: Brian, who will be 2014's Carlos Hyde in the B1G? By that, I mean a player who showed flashes of talent early in his career but blossoms into an all-conference type of performer his final season. Guys like Ohio State CB Doran Grant, PSU RB Bill Belton, and Northwestern LB Chi Chi Ariguzo come to my mind as possibilities.

Brian Bennett: I'm not sure Hyde blossomed as much as he was healthier in 2013 and got plenty of opportunities after his early-season suspension. He did run for 995 yards and 16 touchdowns in 2012 despite some injury problems, after all. I think a better example of someone who went from very good player to all-out beast in 2013 is Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah. Belton could be a guy who takes a similar path, though he has some competition for carries with Zach Zwinak and Akeel Lynch around. Indiana's Tevin Coleman is another running back who could take it to the next level after running for 958 yards in his first season starting. Maybe Iowa's Jordan Canzeri, if he can get more reps (and stay healthy).

On defense, I'd say Michigan State cornerback Trae Waynes could follow Darqueze Dennard's path into superstardom. And Ohio State defensive end Joey Bosa could go bonkers on the league.


Dane from Akron, Penn., writes: Really, Brian? PSU/Michigan, 4-OT game at No. 6? This game had it all. A freshman QB drives 60-plus yards in like 40 seconds (two unbelievable catches on that drive), a clutch kicker missing three field goals... I repeat, 4 OTs!

Brian Bennett: The game had it all except quality of play, as I explained in my post. Just because a game goes long does not mean that it was well-played. You mentioned the missed field goals. The two teams each failed to score in two of the overtimes and there was only one touchdown in all four of the extra periods, which led to a lot of national writers poking fun at the Big Ten on Twitter during the game. There were also seven combined turnovers. It was exciting, no doubt, and a great win for Penn State after a tremendous regulation comeback. But it was also very sloppy.


John R. from Dubuque, Iowa, writes: Brian, am I the only Illini fan that's thrilled to see a new QB take the reins in Illinois? Sure the numbers were great, but the predictable interception always happened! I can't wait for Wes Lunt to play. The way the defense talked about his skills when he ran the scout team's offense is enough make any humbled Illini fan excited of something. Thoughts?

Brian Bennett: You're definitely not alone, John. There's a big buzz about Lunt taking over and running Bill Cubit's spread offense. At 6-foot-5 and 210 pounds, he looks more like a classic quarterback than Nathan Scheelhaase did, and Lunt was a blue-chip stud coming out of high school. I'd caution you not to view him as the savior yet; remember that Lunt struggled a bit as a freshman at Oklahoma State, a program that usually makes quarterbacks look great. There are also questions at receiver for Illinois, and don't discount what Scheelhaase did last year in passing for more than 3,000 yards. Still, the talent is definitely there, and I'm also excited to see what Lunt can do in that offense.


Brutus from The Ninth Circle writes: I don't know about other people, but I've long held the opinion that Penn State underachieves. By this I mean that they are a national power in terms of fan base, facilities, revenue and name brand appeal. Just not a national power on the field. I felt this was certainly true for the last 10-15 years under Paterno. Under O'Brien, you had the sense that the game and team were being upgraded, but he himself didn't have a catchy personality. And I didn't even think it was important until I'm seeing Franklin and his recruiting. It's way too early to tell if that translates to success on the field. But it appears that the foundation is (hopefully) being laid for better results in the future. What I see is someone putting energy into the whole program. It certainly would seem like the program might actually start taking advantage of its assets and capability. Thoughts?

Brian Bennett: I think you can make some parallels between Penn State and Florida State. Both programs were probably held back a little because their legendary coaches stayed on too long. Remember when Joe Paterno was doing his recruiting via Skype from his office? Now you have the almost manic energy of James Franklin, who along with his aggressive assistants will likely kill it on the recruiting trail. Of course, the toll of the NCAA sanctions can't be overstated, and Franklin has to prove that A) he's a championship-caliber head coach; and B) that he's willing to stick around Penn State for a long time. But you're right in that the marriage of Penn State's resources and Franklin's particular skills should prove very fruitful for the Nittany Lions.


Michael B. from East Lansing, Mich., writes: The East Division next season seems to be Michigan State's to lose. I understand that Ohio State will be in the picture, but can we really place Michigan in that race with their lackluster performances over the past few years? Seems to me that Penn State would be the next best in the division going into the season.

Brian Bennett: Michigan State and Ohio State appear to be the clear co-favorites for the East next season. While I expect Michigan to improve on its 2013 showing, the Wolverines still have a lot more question marks in my view than the Spartans or Buckeyes, and they have to play both those teams on the road in '14. Penn State is an intriguing contender because it gets both Ohio State and Michigan State at home, where the Nittany Lions played much better than on the road last year. But I think the Buckeyes and Spartans still have the commanding edge in talent and depth, and we should see one of those two in Indianapolis in December.

Best B1G games of 2013: No. 6

January, 28, 2014
Jan 28
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We're continuing our countdown of the Top 10 games from the Big Ten in 2013. Remember that we're taking into account the stakes in the game, the excitement level, the quality of the performances and the atmosphere.

Quality might not have been the keystone of this next game, but it had everything else as one of the wildest contests of the year ...

No. 6: Penn State 43, Michigan 40, 4 OT, Oct. 12

[+] EnlargePenn State
AP Photo/Gene J. PuskarPenn State staged a late rally to tie the game then later celebrated a 4-OT win over Michigan.
How it went down: A week after an embarrassing 20-point loss at Indiana, Penn State came out of the gates strong at Beaver Stadium against the Wolverines, running out to a 21-10 halftime lead.

The momentum swung Michigan's way in the second half, beginning with a Frank Clark fumble return for a touchdown just 10 seconds into the third quarter. A pair of Devin Gardner touchdown passes put the Maize and Blue ahead 34-24 early in the fourth quarter, and the Wolverines had a first down on the Penn State 28-yard line with 3:10 left while nursing a seven-point lead. Some questionably conservative play-calling and a five-yard delay of game penalty then prompted Brady Hoke to have his team punt from the Nittany Lions' 35, leaving just 50 seconds on the clock.

Christian Hackenberg needed just five plays to lead his offense down the field, tying the score on his own 1-yard rush with 23 seconds left. Penn State scored so fast that Michigan had a chance to win the game in regulation, but Brendan Gibbons missed a 52-yard field goal. Then the real craziness began.

It was a sloppy game that got sloppier in overtime, as neither team even managed to score in the first or third overtime. Penn State's defense held Michigan out of the end zone for all four extra periods, and Bill Belton's 2-yard touchdown run finally ended things. Belton had converted a fourth-and-1 three plays earlier.

The two teams combined to go 7-of-34 on third downs and committed seven turnovers. So, yeah, not so much quality. But Nittany Lions fans were still giddy with the outcome.

Player of the game: Hackenberg wasn't perfect by any means, but he threw for 305 yards and three touchdowns and ran for that score after a supremely clutch game-tying drive. We might look back on that as the start of his legend.

Stat of the game: How even was this game? Michigan had 389 yards of offense, while Penn State had 390.

They said it: "Nothing should amaze you," then-Penn State coach Bill O'Brien said. "There's going to be twists and turns. These are tough kids. They love Penn State. They love playing for each other. The locker room is such a great scene right now because these kids really believe in each other."

More best games

No. 10: Ohio State 31, Wisconsin 24
No. 9: Michigan 41, Notre Dame 30
No. 8: Arizona State 32, Wisconsin 30
No. 7: Ohio State 40, Northwestern 30
Here's a compilation of Twitter reaction from current players, former players and recruits regarding Bill O'Brien's decision to coach the Houston Texans:



STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Most Penn State players reacted with a stunned silence when told of the news that their head coach, Bill O'Brien, was heading to the NFL's Houston Texans.

The story broke about 90 minutes before the new year, and most players were either with friends or on their way to parties. Linebacker Brandon Bell was driving when he answered his buzzing cell phone.

"It's official?" he asked at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday night. "I don't have much to say. ... Yeah, I guess I'm surprised."

[+] EnlargeBelton
Rich Barnes/USA TODAY SportsBill OBrien's departure caught Bill Belton and his teammates by surprise, but the players feel Penn State will be just fine moving forward.
He paused a few seconds and then continued on: "You can't worry about what you can't control. We got to do what we got to do."

Fifteen minutes later and defensive end C.J. Olaniyan said he hadn't heard anything about O'Brien heading elsewhere either. He seemed just as off-guard and even a bit reticent to believe the breaking story.

"Like I said, I haven't heard anything," Olaniyan said. "But no matter what happens, Penn State has shown -- everybody's shown -- that we're going to keep striving forward. No matter what happens."

The overwhelming sentiment from players on Tuesday and Wednesday was one of surprise, but not of betrayal. Their emotions were mixed but not polar -- they felt disappointed, but they were happy for their head coach. They seemed down, but they spoke with conviction about their university and the next season.

"As long as we have each other," wideout Jake Kiley said Wednesday, referring to his teammates, "we'll be fine. I think everyone's in the same mind-set."

Tailback Bill Belton wanted to enjoy the new year, forget about the coaching change and deal with it later. Wideout Allen Robinson hung up as soon as O'Brien's name was mentioned. Offensive guard John Urschel took to Twitter to congratulate his head coach.

Different players reacted differently. But everyone seemed to agree that Penn State's certainly been through worse, and that it would emerge once again just fine.

Those same players who congratulated their head coach first met O'Brien in January 2012 when the relative unknown landed in Happy Valley and told the media he was "thrilled to be the head football coach," months before the NCAA levied unprecedented sanctions against the school. O'Brien asked players for their commitment, their loyalty, and they overwhelmingly surrendered it.

Eugene Lewis, now a rising redshirt sophomore, was one of those players. The coveted four-star recruit arrived on campus a few weeks before those sanctions, and he could've chosen to transfer elsewhere without penalty. But he decided to stick with O'Brien in Happy Valley.

And, even now, Lewis doesn't regret his decision. Even now, he bristled at feeling even the slightest twinge of betrayal by his old coach.

"That's a strong word because you have to look at it from his point of view," Lewis said Wednesday. "He came into a position that was hard for his family, with the sanctions that we got. You have to look at what he did and how he did all he could. You can't really be mad at him for leaving after two years. I still really respect him."

Lewis was at a friend's house, watching ESPN, when he discovered the news of O'Brien's departure. His phone buzzed with calls and texts from his teammates shortly before midnight. They agreed they'd enjoy the night and then just see what happens.

But Lewis was adamant, whomever the next head coach turns out to be, that he'll still be all-in.

"At the end of the day, we all know we're family and we all know we still have to go out there and play for our school," he said. "You have to be able to fight through adversity, and this is just another obstacle. I'm not mad at Coach O'Brien, I'm happy with what he's done for me and this university.

"I know my team and everyone else there at Penn State -- everyone -- is going to be behind us, and we're going to greet the next coach the same way we greeted Coach O'Brien."

Defensive end Curtis Cothran echoed Lewis' words and succinctly summed up the message from Penn State's players: "We're going to be OK."

Looking to the past & future: RBs

December, 19, 2013
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It's never too late -- or too early -- to see what we learned from this past season and also look ahead to next season. So, over the next two weeks, we'll break down each position on the Nittany Lions.

Up today: Running backs.

REWIND

Expectations entering the 2013 season: Zach Zwinak became a household name in Pennsylvania after running for 1,000 yards in 2012, and he was expected to be the bellcow again in 2013. Zwinak was the fifth-string tailback in 2012 but gradually proved himself and was a near-lock to reach the 1,000-yard plateau once again.

Bill Belton was expected to contribute more than last season, as he was listed as the backup in the preseason. But a lot of people believed the younger tailback with the seemingly higher upside -- Akeel Lynch -- would overtake him on the depth chart. Some went so far as to say that Belton's No. 2 spot on the depth chart was just a formality.

How they fared: In the beginning, Zwinak fell well short of expectations. In his first eight games, he crossed the 100-yard mark just once. And he was finally pulled at the season's midpoint because of his fumbling issues. (He was giving up the ball at more than twice the rate of the average college running back.)

Belton took over with strong games against Michigan, Ohio State and Illinois. Big Ten readers even voted him the most surprising tailback in the conference. But he then fumbled in three straight games, fell ill and watched as Zwinak took back his starting job. Zwinak finished the last four games with 150, 149, 149 and 115 rushing yards. Lynch was merely an afterthought.

What we learned: Fumbling is clearly the biggest issue for this group. Zwinak finished strong and showed he's still a good running back, but he'll have to prove he can consistently hold on to the ball. Ditto for Belton. We also learned Lynch needs to understand the playbook more and become more well-rounded before Bill O'Brien plugs him in -- but he's clearly a good runner.

Grading the position: B. On one hand, the Lions finished strong and even saw Belton rumble for 201 yards against Illinois. But they started off slowly and fumbled six times. If they didn't play such an important role in key wins over Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin, this grade would've been lower. But they played well when PSU needed them the most.

FAST FORWARD

Key losses: None. The three top backs -- Zwinak, Belton, Lynch -- all return next season.

Position stock watch: Trending upward. How could this group not have a bright outlook? Belton showed huge strides since last season when it came to his style (fewer cuts now) and his vision. If he has that same type of improvement this offseason, he could push Zwinak for a bigger chunk of the carries.

Zwinak seems to have solidified his role as the top RB, but that obviously has the potential to change under a head coach who prefers to go with the hot hand. With the pair graduating after next season, though, expect to see more Lynch as O'Brien needs to prepare him. Next season should certainly be an interesting one for this group.

Key to next season: Limiting the fumbles. Pick a game this season, any game. There's a 50 percent chance that either Belton or Zwinak fumbled in it. If either tailback gets a case of the fumbles next season, Lynch has the potential to replace him as the No. 2 guy. Fumble-itis could bury someone on the depth chart next year.

Season report card: Penn State

December, 19, 2013
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Final exams are either ongoing or all wrapped up around the Big Ten, and we're passing out grades for each team's regular-season performance.

Each team receives a grade for offense, defense, special teams and overall play.

Up next: Penn State.

Offense: B

[+] EnlargeChristian Hackenberg
Abby Drey/Centre Daily Times/Getty ImagesChristian Hackenberg steadily improved throughout his freshman season, boosting Penn State's offense.
The Nittany Lions weren't dominant in any one category here, as they ranked No. 59 nationally in rushing and No. 38 in passing. But they were a balanced team that relied on quick decisions by Christian Hackenberg, yards-after-the-catch by Allen Robinson and whomever had the hot hand at running back.

Penn State naturally started off slow with a rookie quarterback and an offensive line that struggled early, but this group showed progress as the season went on. Bill O'Brien opted to keep his star quarterback on a short leash in the opener against Syracuse, as he called for runs on third-and-long and rarely called a pass over 10 yards. But O'Brien had unleashed Hackenberg by the season finale -- and the freshman led an aggressive attack against then-No. 15 Wisconsin to the tune of 339 passing yards, four TDs and no interceptions.

Robinson accounted for 46 percent of the passing offense over the season, and he was -- by far -- the most valuable player on this team. He was named the Big Ten's receiver of the year for the second straight season, while his quarterback was named B1G freshman of the year.

This offense never really had a No. 2 receiving threat, and the running backs struggled with holding onto the ball, as Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak combined for a half-dozen fumbles. But Penn State ended the season on a high note and showed it wasn't one-dimensional.

Defense: C

Penn State has become accustomed to great defenses, as it's ranked within the top 20 in yards allowed seven times since 2004. But that certainly wasn't the case this season.

The secondary was a constant liability. Third-and-long was no shoo-in for a punt the next down, and pass-first teams tormented the Lions -- just take a look at UCF and Indiana. The historic 63-14 loss to Ohio State certainly stands out as one of the worst-ever defensive performances by Penn State, as it was the worst PSU loss in 114 years.

So, why isn't this grade lower then? Well, in the Lions' last five conference games, they held all but Purdue -- whom they beat 45-21 -- to less than their season average in points scored. DT DaQuan Jones finished with 11.5 tackles-for-loss and led a stout run defense that plugged the middle in just about every game outside of Ohio State. For example, Wisconsin managed just 120 total rushing yards on 30 carries. Penn State also finished fourth in the Big Ten in sacks (28) and ranked No. 49 nationally in total defense.

This wasn't a great defense. It was an average one -- with a below-average secondary and an above-average front-seven -- that failed big against Ohio State but grabbed high marks against Wisconsin.

Special teams: D-minus

There's really not a whole lot of good to say here. Jesse Della Valle returned 18 punts and averaged a respectable 8.7 yards a return, while Alex Butterworth had 17 of his 51 punts wind up inside the 20.

And that's where the highlights end.

The Nittany Lions ranked last in the Big Ten in kick return average, 10th in punting average and second-to-last in both field goal percentage and kickoff coverage. Kicker Sam Ficken cooled off by the halfway point, and special teams cost Penn State a win against Nebraska.

Ficken missed a 37-yard field goal and an extra point against the Cornhuskers, while Kenny Bell returned a kickoff 99 yards for a touchdown. Penn State lost in overtime, 23-20.

Overall: B

Sixty-one scholarship players? A quarterback who was on campus for just two months before the opener? A defense short on individual talent? There were plenty of question marks surrounding this team before the season, but the Nittany Lions once again overcame the odds to finish with a winning record. They picked up a win on the road against a top-15 opponent, Wisconsin, for the first time since 2008. And they pulled out two wins in a conference record-tying three overtime games this season. Penn State might have had more odds stacked against it this season than last, and it showed once again you can never totally count this team out.

What we learned: Week 13

November, 24, 2013
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Lessons learned from Penn State's 23-20 overtime loss to Nebraska in Week 13:

1. Running-back-by-committee is nice -- but not required. Bill Belton missed the game with an undisclosed illness and stood on the sideline in street clothes, so it was the "Zach Zwinak Show" on Saturday -- and he came through just fine. Zwinak carried the ball 35 times for 149 yards. But it wasn't the first time a Penn State tailback has been asked to carry the full load. Belton had 36 carries against Illinois while Zwinak was in the midst of his fumbling phase (at least we think it was a phase). So it's clear these tailbacks are conditioned enough to handle a heavy load. Obviously, neither guy can do this every game over a full season. But if one guy is injured for a week or two? Definitely not time to hit the panic button. Having two guys who can run like that definitely has to make the staff feel better about its depth at the position.

2. Special teams needs more than just coaching to improve. Bill O'Brien said last Saturday, following the win against Purdue, that maybe he needed to find hungrier players to put on the kick-coverage team. On Tuesday, he changed his mind and said he just needed to coach better. Well, Bo Pelini said the players were coached just fine, but PSU's special-teams units still had their worst combined performance of the season. Kenny Bell ran back a kick 99 yards for a TD, a punt return was fumbled, a punt was blocked, and an extra point was missed. It was a day to forget for the special teams and, clearly, something has to give there. Maybe O'Brien and Co. need to coach better, but maybe they also need to find more athletic run-ons for special teams, too.

3. Tight ends could be the answer next season. Senior Brandon Felder and redshirt freshman Eugene Lewis had games to forget for Penn State as wideouts. But, outside of Allen Robinson, the tight ends really showed up to play. Six-foot-7 TE Jesse James flashed some speed on a swing pass that turned into a 46-yard touchdown. TE Adam Breneman caught a nice touchdown pass. And Kyle Carter looked good at times, as well. If Robinson doesn't return next season -- and that's looking more and more like an inevitability -- then these tight ends might just be the future. Saturday's game could've been a glimpse of that.

4. There could be some hope for this defense after all. It's not time to break open the champagne or anything, but true freshman linebacker Brandon Bell played well. And the secondary didn't look completely lost against a receiving corps that Jordan Lucas called the best it would face all season. The defense surrendered just one touchdown -- special teams allowed the other -- and, if it can string together more bend-don't-break games like that, then fewer fans are sure to call for the head of defensive coordinator John Butler. It was a positive step. The defensive line got great pressure on Nebraska, and that seemed to be key.

5 things: Nebraska at Penn State

November, 23, 2013
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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Penn State is trying to send its seniors out with a win, and Bo Pelini is hoping to make a stronger case to keep his job. It should be an entertaining one at Beaver Stadium.

Here are five things to keep an eye on:

1. Offensive sparkplugs Allen Robinson and Ameer Abdullah. Two of the better players in the Big Ten will be featured in Saturday's game, and they could both be in for big performances. Robinson already owns Penn State's single-season records for receiving yards (1,204) and catches (81) with two contests left, and nearly half of his yards are coming after the catch. Abdullah has rushed for at least 98 yards in every game this season and is averaging 6.5 yards a carry. Both respective offenses lean heavily on these two players, and whoever has the bigger day could wind up leading his team to victory.

2. Plenty of emotion on Senior Day. Ask any Penn State player to describe this team, and the term "resilient" is bound to pop up. These seniors have been through a lot -- unprecedented sanctions, a scandal, the death of a longtime head coach -- and this is their final chance to leave a mark inside Beaver Stadium. There's no question the Nittany Lions will be motivated Saturday. Tears will be shed, players will embrace, and this game is sure to be a memorable one no matter the final outcome. But the 17 players who'll be honored in their final home game want to go out as winners, and they'll leave it all out there this afternoon.

3. PSU offense on third downs. The Nittany Lions have had an up-and-down season with third downs -- but it's been a lot more down than up. PSU is No. 94 in the country in converting just 35.9 percent of their third downs (52-of-145), and it's going to have an even harder time against Nebraska. The Cornhuskers' defense is No. 7 in third-down conversion percentage, as their opponents have gotten first downs just 30.9 percent of the time. To contrast that number, PSU converted just 1-of-9 third downs against Minnesota -- and the Gophers are ranked No. 62 in the country in that category. This will be a key area to watch again against Nebraska.

4. Freshman quarterbacks playing beyond their years. Tommy Armstrong Jr. has played relatively well in place of Taylor Martinez, but the Huskers haven't leaned on him that much. He's 5-1 as a starter, but he's only had one game with more than 21 pass attempts. Hackenberg has thrown at least 23 passes in every game, and he's playing better right now than Armstrong. Both quarterbacks will be asked to pick up the slack, and both could be the future of the Big Ten.

5. Fumbling issues. Only seven teams in the country have lost fumbles (12) more often than Penn State and, for the Lions to experience success, they'll have to get turnover-free games from Hackenberg and their running backs. Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak have both played well at times this season, but they've also lost three fumbles apiece. The average NCAA tailback fumbles about once every 91 carries, while those two are fumbling about once every 51 carries. They'll play a big role in the game, so those mistakes have to be non-existent.
Among the celebrated history of the Nebraska-Penn State series, Saturday in State College marks, well, the 16th game. This meeting of storied programs arrives without much of the drama that has accompanied prior clashes. The Cornhuskers are Nittany Lions are both unranked and out of contention for The Big Ten title.

Regardless, plenty of pride remains at stake. Let’s talk about it:

Considering the circumstances, what are the mindsets at Nebraska and Penn State as Saturday nears?

[+] EnlargeZach Zwinak
Rich Barnes/USA TODAY SportsFor Zach Zwinak and the rest of the Penn State seniors, this final home game is sure to be an emotional one.
Josh Moyer: Believe it or not, even without a postseason, the future is not on the minds of these Nittany Lions. This is the final home game for Penn State's seniors, and there's more on the line Saturday than usual. The Lions can't play for any bowl games because of the sanctions but, in the words of cornerback Jordan Lucas, these final two games are Penn State's bowl games. These seniors have endured more than most in the country -- the death of a longtime coach, a scandal heard 'round the nation, unprecedented sanctions, etc. -- and this is their final opportunity to leave a mark. Expectations this season hovered around eight wins, so a win here -- getting past .500 -- would be huge for Penn State. This game will be an emotional one for PSU, and a win surely means a lot to this team.

Mitch Sherman: The Huskers are a prideful bunch. And despite the many goals that vanished this year earlier than ever in coach Bo Pelini's six seasons, Nebraska shows no signs of playing with less than 100-percent effort. The Penn State name and setting at Beaver Stadium figures to stir some emotions with Huskers who understand the history of these programs. Nebraska is young on both sides of the football after injuries decimated the veteran offensive line. Young players tend stay focused more easily on the future. And once you get past pride and the incentive to again win nine games, the future serves a primary motivational factor for the Huskers.



What do you envision as the role in this game of Penn State's star receiver, Allen Robinson?

JM: He's the Penn State X-factor, as he's being targeted around every third throw. He's accounted for nearly half of the Penn State passing offense this season, and he's one of the top wideouts in school history. For PSU to experience any kind of success through the air, Robinson will need to have a big game. Minnesota had the right idea when it shadowed Robinson with two defenders on nearly every play – Gophers defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys said you could count on one hand the number of times Robinson experienced single-coverage -- but, even in that game, Robinson came away with seven of Christian Hackenberg's 14 completions. It's boom-or-bust for Robinson and the passing game.

MS: The Huskers are confident in their ability to cover with cornerbacks Ciante Evans and Stanley Jean-Baptiste, but they'll be hard-pressed to stay with Robinson. Jean-Baptiste is a playmaking NFL prospect, but he's not a lockdown corner on the level of, say, Michigan State's Darqueze Dennard -- or even Evans. Nebraska will mix its coverages in an attempt to confuse Hackenberg. Still, the freshman QB will find a way to get the football to Robinson. But just how much and in what position to gain yards after the catch? The answer figures to loom large in determining a winner.

Nebraska and Penn State feature freshmen quarterbacks. How do you expect them to play?

MS: Tommy Armstrong has shown excellent poise and resilience in his six starts as a replacement for injured senior Taylor Martinez. Armstrong has also displayed a streak of carelessness and a tendency to make mistakes. He threw three interceptions against both Purdue and Northwestern, then committed three more costly turnovers against Michigan State. In between, he led the Huskers on a game-winning drive at Michigan. Look for Nebraska to utilize Armstrong's athleticism against Penn State and rely on a heavy dose of Ameer Abdullah in an attempt to beat the Nittany Lions in the perimeter run game. The less Nebraska can place Armstrong in high-pressure spots, the better.

JM: Unlike Armstrong, Hackenberg has had the luxury of starting since Week 1. He's shrugged off mistakes, led PSU to two comeback wins (Michigan, Illinois) and has progressed every week. Despite his strong arm, he's been most dangerous on short-to-intermediate throws, and he's attempted at least 23 passes every game. Bill O'Brien isn't afraid to air it out but, like Nebraska, we'll likely see quite a bit of Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak in the backfield. Outside of Robinson, Hackenberg doesn't really have a key receiving target, and O'Brien has really been emphasizing the running game lately.

How do you expect the game to unfold?

JM: It's really going to come down to Penn State's hit-or-miss defense. The secondary has struggled, the entire unit is slow, and missed tackles have become a common occurrence. I could see this game following a similar path as the Minnesota contest, in that PSU will aim to stop the run. But even if that works early on -- just as it did against the Gophers -- there's no guarantee PSU will be able to stop a so-so passing attack. A good early indicator to PSU's defense will be how many long runs it allows and just how it fares on third downs. When the defense struggles, those seem to be the places where it really falls apart. That being said, the defense has played poorly all season -- and I think Nebraska has the advantage. I'm calling for the Huskers in a mild upset.

MS: For Nebraska, it's the same story, new chapter. Much like every game since the Huskers visited Minnesota on Oct. 26, the opportunity to win is right there, but Nebraska must limit its turnovers and special teams mistakes. Don't discount the emotion in play for Penn State on Senior Day. These Nittany Lions have endured so much in State College, and they've failed to beat Nebraska in two tries, a reality that ought to stoke the fires additionally for PSU players and fans. Still, Nebraska has the edge in talent and depth. And with a week to replay all the mental errors that spelled doom against Michigan State, look for the Huskers, by comparison, to play a clean game. Pull it off, and I like Nebraska to win a one-score contest.

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