Penn State Nittany Lions: Cody Webster

The official invite list for the 2014 NFL combine is out, and 36 Big Ten players will try to impress pro scouts during workouts in Indianapolis from Feb. 22-25. In case you were wondering, that's fourth most among conferences behind the SEC (71 invitees), the ACC (48) and the Pac-12 (45).

Here are the Big Ten players who were invited, broken down by position:

Quarterbacks (0)

Running backs (2)

Wide receivers (8)

Tight ends (2)

Offensive linemen (8)

Defensive linemen (2)

Linebackers (7)

Defensive backs (7)

Specialists (0)

Breakdown
It's a strong list of players, but were there any snubs. Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez, Michigan State linebacker Denicos Allen and Iowa cornerback B.J. Lowery jump out right away as missing, though Martinez has injury (and position) concerns, while Allen's small frame means he'll have to prove to scouts he can play at the next level.

I'm also a bit surprised not to see Indiana's Ted Bolser on this list; he's not a traditional blocking tight end, but his receiving skills would seem to translate to the NFL. Only nine kickers and punters were invited to Indy, yet it's a little disappointing that Purdue's Cody Webster and Northwestern's Jeff Budzien weren't included in the specialists.

Others who could have gotten an invite include Purdue defensive tackle Bruce Gaston, Ohio State guard Andrew Norwell and Nebraska defensive back Ciante Evans.

That doesn't mean those guys won't play in the NFL. But their path to the league might be a little more winding.

Big Ten lunchtime links

January, 22, 2014
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Sure, it's cold now. But pitchers and catchers report in just three weeks.

Big Ten's lunch links

December, 12, 2013
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Where did all the football go?
  • Urban Meyer senses an improved mood for Ohio State as it turns the page to the Discover Orange Bowl, and Clemson coach Dabo Swinney had high praise for his upcoming opponent.
  • With another season in the books, the conversation at Penn State will shift to Bill O'Brien's future with the program, as likely suitors again line up for his services.
  • Taylor Lewan has no regrets about returning to Michigan for another season, and he doesn't believe his draft stock has changed since last year.
  • Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi spurned an offer to take over at UConn, and now his full attention is on getting the Spartans ready for a bowl game.
  • Early in the season, Nebraska was desperately searching for a field general on defense. It appears to have found one in middle linebacker Michael Rose.
  • After getting benched late in a loss to Penn State to end the regular season, Wisconsin tackle Tyler Marz is looking for redemption.
  • Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany said Rutgers' transition into the league is going smoothly at every level.
  • Controversy won't be going away when college football shifts to a playoff, with Tom Osborne joking that the selection committee will succeed if it doesn't "get lynched."
  • Cody Webster is rubbing elbows with the nation's best football players, and the Purdue punter is thinking about asking to snap a picture with Johnny Manziel.
  • Silver Football candidate Braxton Miller had everything change for him when he was almost sent to the bench in October. Now he's on the brink of a historic accomplishment.
You've had a chance to check out the 2013 All-Big Ten teams and individual award winners. The four major award winners -- Offensive Player of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Coach of the Year and Freshman of the Year -- will be unveiled Tuesday.

Let's dive into today's selections ...

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

The overall list isn't bad, although some of the selections certainly are debatable.
  • Ohio State's Carlos Hyde takes home the Ameche-Dayne Running Back of the Year award after bulldozing the competition in Big Ten play (1,249 rush yards, 14 touchdowns). Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah has a strong case for the honor after his consistent success, eclipsing 100 rush yards in 10 of 12 games. But Hyde certainly finished on a stronger note with 226 rush yards against Michigan, the most ever for an Ohio State player in The Game. He was unstoppable in the most important games.
  • Michigan tackle Taylor Lewan claims Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year honors for the second consecutive season. Lewan had a very good season, and a great season, if you believe Wolverines coach Brady Hoke. But he anchored a line that struggled for much of Big Ten play. Ohio State tackle Jack Mewhort probably has a case here, as he led the league's best front five.
  • Wisconsin's Chris Borland gets the nod for Butkus-Fitzgerald Linebacker of the Year, ahead of fellow standouts like Ohio State's Ryan Shazier, Michigan State's Max Bullough and Iowa's James Morris. Borland did it all in his four seasons as a Badger, constantly swarming to the ball and making plays. But he missed some time with a hamstring injury this season, and Shazier's overall numbers are more impressive. It will be interesting to see who wins Defensive Player of the Year honors. There are so many great linebackers in this league.
  • Purdue's Cody Webster won Eddleman-Fields Punter of the Year ahead of Michigan State's Mike Sadler, Ohio State's Cameron Johnston and others. Webster is the Big Ten's only finalist for the Ray Guy Award, but Sadler should have been on there as well. It's a really close call between Webster and Sadler, who successfully executed two fakes and played for a much better team.
  • Four players are repeat winners from 2012: Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller, Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson, Lewan and Northwestern kicker Jeff Budzien.
ALL-BIG TEN TEAMS

Overall, these looked a little better than the 2012 version, which contained several glaring problems in our view. The coaches' team continues to surprise us (not in a good way) with six defensive backs and two punters because of ties in the voting, and no Mewhort on the first team is hard to believe. But this was a slight step up.

(By the way, the Big Ten still doesn't have either of us vote for the media team, so direct your blame elsewhere).
  • Lewan, Mewhort and Iowa's Brandon Scherff all are terrific tackles, but we would have gone with Mewhort and Lewan on the first team, which the coaches did not.
  • Although Michigan's Devin Funchess claimed Kwalick-Clark Tight End of the Year honors, the coaches went with Iowa's C.J. Fiedorowicz as their first-team tight end. We can debate whether Funchess actually is a tight end or not, but his receiving numbers (47 catches, 727 yards, six touchdowns) are way better than Fiedorowicz's (26 catches, 253 yards, six TDs).
  • The coaches had six first-team defensive backs but didn't find room for Michigan's Blake Countess, who tied for the league lead in interceptions, or Nebraska's Stanley Jean-Baptiste, who had four picks and 11 pass breakups. Maybe only one Michigan State safety (our pick would be Kurtis Drummond) should be there.
  • Michigan wide receiver Jeremy Gallon had some huge performances, but he probably belongs on the second team behind Penn State's Robinson and Wisconsin's Jared Abbrederis, who were more consistent as the season went along. The coaches went with Ohio State's Corey Brown as their other second-team wideout, while the media went with Indiana's Cody Latimer. We like Latimer there.
  • One player the coaches and media differed on is Minnesota safety Brock Vereen, a first-team selection by the coaches but just an honorable mention selection by the media. He probably belongs right in between, on the second team, after leading a stout Gophers defense.
  • Another big difference between the coaches and media involved Iowa's B.J. Lowery. The media voted him as a first-team defensive back, while the coaches did not have Lowery among their eight choices on the first and second teams. Lowery is a nice player, but we're scratching our heads a bit as to why he was a first-team pick by the media.
  • Both Wisconsin back, Melvin Gordon and James White, made the second team. It says a lot about the depth at running back this year that Michigan State's Jeremy Langford, who ran for 1,200 yards and 16 touchdowns, couldn't crack the first or second teams.
  • We sure wish the league had a process for breaking ties on the coaches' team. Six defensive backs and two punters? That's just strange, though we'd like to see that two-punter formation in real life.
  • Connor Cook or Nathan Scheelhaase as the second-team quarterback? The coaches and media split on that. Scheelhaase has the better numbers, but Cook won all eight Big Ten starts. No wonder that latter fact probably impressed the coaches more.
  • The major awards -- offensive and defensive players of the year, freshman of the year and coach of the year -- will be announced on Tuesday.
The Big Ten has released its official 2013 all-conference teams as selected by the coaches and media, along with some of the major individual award winners. We'll have reaction to the choices in a bit, but first digest these lists:

Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year: Braxton Miller, Ohio State

Richter-Howard Receiver of the Year: Allen Robinson, Penn State

Ameche-Dayne Running Back of the Year: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State

Kwalick-Clark Tight End of the Year: Devin Funchess, Michigan

Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year: Taylor Lewan, Michigan

Smith-Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State

Butkus-Fitzgerald Linebacker of the Year: Chris Borland, Wisconsin

Tatum-Woodson Defensive Back of the Year: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State

Bakken-Andersen Kicker of the Year: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

Eddleman-Fields Punter of the Year: Cody Webster, Purdue

First team (coaches)

QB: Braxton Miller, Ohio State
RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska
RB: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State
WR: Allen Robinson, Penn State
WR: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
Andrew Weber/USA TODAY SportsOhio State's Braxton Miller has been named the Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year in the Big Ten.
C: Corey Linsley, Ohio State
G: John Urschel, Penn State
G: Ryan Groy, Wisconsin
T: Brandon Scherff, Iowa
T: Taylor Lewan, Michigan
TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa
K: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

DL: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State
DL: Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
DL: Randy Gregory, Nebraska
DL: DaQuan Jones, Penn State
LB: Max Bullough, Michigan State
LB: Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
LB: Chris Borland, Wisconsin
DB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
DB: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State
DB: Isaiah Lewis, Michigan State
DB: Brock Vereen, Minnesota
DB: Ciante Evans, Nebraska
DB: Bradley Roby, Ohio State
P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State
P: Cody Webster, Purdue

First team (Media)

QB: Braxton Miller, Ohio State
RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska
RB: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State
WR: Allen Robinson, Penn State
WR: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
C: Corey Linsley, Ohio State
G: Andrew Norwell, Ohio State
G: John Urschel, Penn State
T: Taylor Lewan, Michigan
T: Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan
K: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

DL: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State
DL: Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
DL: Randy Gregory, Nebraska
DL: Noah Spence, Ohio State
LB: Max Bullough, Michigan State
LB: Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
LB: Chris Borland, Wisconsin
DB: B.J. Lowery, Iowa
DB: Blake Countess, Michigan
DB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
DB: Bradley Roby, Ohio State
P: Cody Webster, Purdue

Second team (Coaches)

[+] EnlargeShilique Calhoun
Mike Carter/USA TODAY SportsMichigan State's Shilique Calhoun has been named the Smith-Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year in the Big Ten.
QB: Connor Cook, Michigan State
RB: Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin
RB: James White, Wisconsin
WR: Jeremy Gallon, Michigan
WR: Corey Brown, Ohio State
C: Cole Pensick, Nebraska
G: Blake Treadwell, Michigan State
G: Andrew Norwell, Ohio State
T: Brett Van Sloten, Iowa
T: Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan
K: Mitch Ewald, Indiana

DL: Carl Davis, Iowa
DL: Frank Clark, Michigan
DL: Michael Bennett, Ohio State
DL: Noah Spence, Ohio State
LB: Anthony Hitchens, Iowa
LB: James Morris, Iowa
LB: Denicos Allen, Michigan State
DB: Blake Countess, Michigan
DB: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska

Second team (Media)

QB: Nathan Scheelhaase, Illinois
RB: Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin
RB: James White, Wisconsin
WR: Cody Latimer, Indiana
WR: Jeremy Gallon, Michigan
C: Jack Allen, Michigan State
G: Blake Treadwell, Michigan State
G: Ryan Groy, Wisconsin
T: Brandon Scherff, Iowa
T: Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin
TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa
K: Mike Meyer, Iowa

DL: Theiren Cockran, Minnesota
DL: Tyler Scott, Northwestern
DL: Michael Bennett, Ohio State
DL: DaQuan Jones, Penn State
LB: Jonathan Brown, Illinois
LB: James Morris, Iowa
LB: Denicos Allen, Michigan State
LB: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State
DB: Ciante Evans, Nebraska
DB: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska
DB: Ricardo Allen, Purdue
P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State

Honorable mention (coaches): ILLINOIS: Jonathan Brown, Steve Hull, Nathan Scheelhaase; INDIANA: Ted Bolser, Tevin Coleman, Cody Latimer, Jason Spriggs; IOWA: Austin Blythe, Conor Boffeli, Christian Kirksey, B.J. Lowery, Tanner Miller, Louis Trinca-Pasat; MICHIGAN: Jibreel Black, Michael Schofield; MICHIGAN STATE: Jack Allen, Fou Fonoti, Dan France, Jeremy Langford, Marcus Rush, Trae Waynes; MINNESOTA: Caleb Bak, Aaron Hill, Peter Mortell, Eric Murray; NEBRASKA: Jason Ankrah, Kenny Bell, Corey Cooper, Andrew Rodriguez, Jeremiah Sirles; NORTHWESTERN: Ibraheim Campbell, Tyler Scott, Brandon Vitabile; OHIO STATE: C.J. Barnett, Drew Basil, Joey Bosa, Doran Grant, Marcus Hall, Jeff Heuerman, Cameron Johnston, Devin Smith; PENN STATE: Adrian Amos, Glenn Carson, Christian Hackenberg, Ty Howle, Jordan Lucas, C.J. Olaniyan, Donovan Smith; PURDUE: Ricardo Allen; WISCONSIN: Beau Allen, Rob Havenstein,Tyler Marz, Pat Muldoon, Jacob Pedersen, Dezmen Southward.

Honorable mention (media): ILLINOIS: Houston Bates, Steve Hull; INDIANA: Tim Bennett, Ted Bolser, Tevin Coleman, Mitch Ewald, Collin Rahrig, Jason Spriggs; IOWA: Austin Blythe, Conor Boffeli, Carl Davis, Anthony Hitchens, Christian Kirksey, Casey Kreiter, John Lowdermilk, Tanner Miller, Louis Trinca-Pasat, Brett Van Sloten; MICHIGAN: Jibreel Black, Frank Clark, Devin Gardner, Brendan Gibbons; Raymon Taylor; MICHIGAN STATE: Connor Cook, Fou Fonoti, Dan France, Michael Geiger, Jeremy Langford, Isaiah Lewis, Marcus Rush; Trae Waynes; MINNESOTA: Caleb Bak, Josh Campion, Zac Epping, Peter Mortell, Eric Murray, Brock Vereen; NEBRASKA: Jason Ankrah, Kenny Bell, Cole Pensick, Andrew Rodriguez, Jeremiah Sirles, Pat Smith; NORTHWESTERN: Chi Chi Ariguzo, Ibraheim Campbell, Damien Proby, Brandon Vitabile; OHIO STATE: C.J. Barnett, Drew Basil, Joey Bosa, Corey Brown, Doran Grant, Marcus Hall, Jeff Heuerman, Cameron Johnston; PENN STATE: Glenn Carson, Sam Ficken, Christian Hackenberg, Ty Howle, Jesse James, Jordan Lucas, C.J. Olaniyan, Donovan Smith; WISCONSIN: Beau Allen, Michael Caputo, Tyler Marz, Pat Muldoon, Jacob Pedersen, Sojourn Shelton, Dezmen Southward, Joel Stave.

Poll: Big Ten's biggest award snub

November, 27, 2013
11/27/13
2:30
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The college football award finalists were revealed earlier this week, and for the Big Ten, it brought more snubs than selections. Although standouts like Ohio State linebacker Ryan Shazier, Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard and Purdue punter Cody Webster are up for national awards, others like Wisconsin linebacker Chris Borland and Nebraska running back Ameer Abdullah surprisingly didn't make the cut.

Today's poll question asks: Which Big Ten player was snubbed the most for a national award?

Here are the candidates (in alphabetical order) ...

SportsNation

Which Big Ten player was snubbed the most for a national award?

  •  
    33%
  •  
    30%
  •  
    3%
  •  
    17%
  •  
    17%

Discuss (Total votes: 7,269)

Nebraska running back Ameer Abdullah (Doak Walker Award): Abdullah wasn't a finalist for the Doak despite leading the Big Ten and ranking seventh nationally in rushing (134.8 ypg). He has eclipsed 100 rush yards in all but one game -- he had 98 against UCLA -- and in every Big Ten contest. Abdullah averages 145.4 yards in league games and 6.4 yards per carry for the season.

Wisconsin linebacker Chris Borland (Dick Butkus Award): Borland amazingly didn't make the Butkus list despite a decorated career at Wisconsin filled with All-Big Ten honors. He tied the NCAA career record for forced fumbles last Saturday with his 14th, and he's averaging 12.2 tackles and 1.3 tackles for loss in his past five games, leading a defense that ranks fifth nationally in points allowed and seventh against the run.

Northwestern kicker Jeff Budzien (Lou Groza Award): After winning Big Ten co-kicker of the year honors in 2012, Budzien continued to excel this season, leading the league in both field goals (20) and field-goal attempts (22), a conversion rate of 90.9 percent. He was a major asset for a Northwestern offense that has struggled to find the end zone in Big Ten play. Only two kickers have more field goals than Budzien, but he wasn't among the Groza finalists.

Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson (Biletnikoff Award): Like Budzien, Robinson won the Big Ten's top award for his position in 2012, and keeps producing at a high rate. He leads the Big Ten in both receptions (89) and receiving yards (1,310), ranking fifth nationally in receiving yards per game (119.1) and eighth in receptions average (8.1). But it wasn't enough to get him on the list of Biletnikoff Award finalists.

Michigan State punter Mike Sadler (Ray Guy Award): Spartans coach Mark Dantonio considers the punt the "most important single play in football," and Sadler has helped MSU tremendously this year, averaging 42.4 yards per punt and placing 27 punts inside the opponent's 20-yard line (15 fair catches). He was especially important early in the season when the Spartans struggled mightily on offense, and he has successfully executed two fakes. But it wasn't enough to get him on the list of finalists for the Guy Award.

Big Ten weekend rewind: Week 3

September, 16, 2013
9/16/13
11:00
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Joel Stave reacts to the refereeChristian Petersen/Getty ImagesJoel Stave and the rest of the Wisconsin Badgers were flabbergasted by the ending of Saturday night's loss to Arizona State, as the Badgers bizarrely ran out of time deep in ASU territory.
It was a rough weekend all around for the Big Ten, which went 0-3 against ranked teams, 1-3 versus the Pac-12 and only 5-5 against FBS competition. Even some of the winning teams either had major scares (Michigan), looked sluggish (Northwestern) or had the game overshadowed by a different concern (Minnesota).

But, really, all I want to talk about is the Wisconsin-Arizona State ending, aka the Desert Debacle.

If you haven't read up on one of the most absurd finishes of all time yet, take a moment to brush up here and here and here. Consider all the things that went sideways in 18 infamous seconds:

  • As Badgers quarterback Joel Stave ran to his left to center the ball for an upcoming field goal try, he collided into the backside of left guard Ryan Groy and very nearly clipped Groy's heel while attempting to kneel. (Groy didn't even need to be there, as he'd shed a defender and had no one left to block.) Adding to the confusion, Stave quickly bounced up and placed the ball on the 15-yard line as if the pigskin were covered with scorpions. Had he merely Tebowed it and held onto the ball for a couple of seconds, or just handed it to an official, the ensuing chaos probably doesn't occur.
  • A whistle had blown and the referee, stationed behind the Wisconsin offense, clearly signaled the ball as down. And yet, other officials and players seemed unsure if Stave had actually knelt or whether it was a live, loose ball. Postgame photographic evidence proved he did take a knee, but it took a specific angle on a freeze frame from the hi-def broadcast to remove doubt. Things aren't nearly as clear in full speed live action when you're a 50-year-old-plus referee who's been running around in desert heat for three-plus hours.
  • But here's the thing: It shouldn't have mattered whether Stave's knee actually ever touched the turf. According to the NCAA rules manual (specifically, Rule 4, Article 2, Section A), the ball is dead if "an official sounds his whistle (even though inadvertently) or otherwise signals the ball dead." Later in Rule 4, the handbook states that the play is dead "when a ball carrier simulates placing his knee on the ground." So Stave should be off the hook here, even though his actions looked odd at the time.
  • Three Sun Devils players went for the ball, understandably so given the mixed signals, and Anthony Jones laid on it for more than five seconds. Ironically, Arizona State fans booed earlier in the game when they thought Wisconsin's Michael Caputo faked an injury to slow their team's offensive pace by the goal line. Apparently, an even better way to disrupt tempo is to smother the ball like it's a rogue hand grenade, because Jones astonishingly got away with a clear and obvious delay of game infraction.
  • Even if Stave's kneel-down had gone smoothly, the clock would not have stopped, and the Badgers had no timeouts. Yet, Stave and his teammates wasted precious time by looking to the confused officials instead of rushing into formation for a spike. In fact, Wisconsin players only frantically pointed to the clock when there were two seconds left. The umpire, moving slower than most Arizona retirees, wrongly signaled for the Badgers line to back away, but even that didn't happen until 0:02. The umpire also appeared never to have looked at the referee as the latter was signaling the ball as down.

Without question, the Pac-12 officiating crew displayed a shocking lack of rules knowledge and cohesion. They never huddled together to try and figure out what had happened. The referee, who presumably whistled the play dead and signaled it as so, should have taken charge of the situation. It's disgraceful that two teams could play so hard for 59-plus minutes, only to have officials approach the frenzied final moments so casually (they sure moved fast once they'd decided the Sun Devils had won, however). And if we're going to continually interrupt games for replays, many of which have seemingly little effect on the final outcome, then why isn't there a protocol in place to correct last-second disasters like this on review?

While the officials deserve nearly all the blame, Wisconsin played with fire in trying to get the ball into only slightly better kicking position with the clock dwindling. Badgers coach Gary Andersen said his team practices that specific play for that amount of time, but any seasoned Saturday observer knows that most college teams are notoriously bad at late-game execution. That's because of both inexperienced players and the NCAA 20-hour rule that limits the amount of time coaches can spend on such scenarios. Even when teams do practice for it, they can neither simulate nor predict how quickly -- or, in this case, how interminably -- a given official will clear the pile and spot the ball.

Two more points to consider: First, the bizarre finish absolved Arizona State's Todd Graham of some atrocious clock management and play calling on the Sun Devils' final drive. Graham has yet to impress as a head coach; he twice decided to go for two-point conversions far too early in a back-and-forth game, and it nearly cost his team.

Secondly, Wisconsin's kicking game has been highly suspect for a while now, so there's no guarantee Kyle French makes that field goal, even if it's only from 27 yards out after a delay penalty. But French is 6-for-6 in his career from 30 yards or closer, and he'd made one from 34 earlier Saturday night. It's a shame we'll never know if he could have hit the game winner.

One last question: Why do so many weird things keep cropping up at the end of games for the Badgers, who now have 10 losses by a touchdown or less since the start of 2011? Wisconsin fans can no longer scapegoat Bret Bielema for late-game mismanagement; his wife's schadenfreude was readily apparent when Jen Bielema tweeted "#karma" shortly after the Arizona State fiasco ended.

Take that and rewind it back ...

Team of the Week: Iowa. The Hawkeyes snapped a two-game losing streak against Iowa State, beat a FBS team for the first time since Oct. 13 of last year, and now can feel much better about a potential return to postseason play.

Biggest hangover: Nebraska. For all the obvious reasons. The sky isn't falling in Lincoln, as the Huskers should still be able to win at least eight or nine games. But the sun sure ain't shining, either.

[+] EnlargeMark Weisman
David Purdy/Getty ImagesMark Weisman made 35 carries against Iowa State. Workhorse running backs are still typical throughout the Big Ten.
Fun with numbers (via ESPN Stats & Info): Iowa’s Mark Weisman ranks third in the FBS in rushing yards, but his most impressive stat might be his 85 carries. Weisman, who toted it 35 times versus Iowa State, has run the ball 10 times more than anybody else in the nation. Michigan State workhorse Le'Veon Bell had 81 carries through three games last year. ... Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon, meanwhile, leads the country at 12.89 yards per rush. The redshirt sophomore is averaging 10.1 yards per attempt for his career. ... Indiana’s Nate Sudfeld has taken over the Big Ten lead in QBR. Sudfeld ranks seventh nationally with his 91.7 raw score (based on a 100 point scale). Sudfeld also is tied for the national lead in most completions of 20 yards or more, with 19. ... Penn State continues to baffle with its ineptitude on third down, having now converted just four of 34 tries. Only Miami of Ohio (3-for-29) has been worse. ... Bet you wouldn’t have guessed this, but Iowa is leading the league in plays per game, at 83 snaps per contest. The Hawkeyes are tied for 10th nationally in plays per game. Minnesota is running the fewest plays per game in the Big Ten, at 60.

Big Man on Campus (Offense): Kenny Guiton -- or Kenny Football, as I’ve taken to calling him, because the real Kenny G is far too lame -- continues to get it done in Braxton Miller's absence. The Ohio State quarterback threw for 276 yards and four touchdowns and ran for 92 yards in the win at Cal. Urban Meyer says he might find ways to play Guiton when Miller is healthy.

Big Man on Campus (Defense): Not a lot of great individual defensive performances in Week 3 (see below), so we’ll go with Iowa’s linebackers. Christian Kirksey, Anthony Hitchens and James Morris combined for 25 tackles, and Morris had a 27-yard interception return. They helped limit Iowa State to just 59 yards rushing.

Big Man on Campus (Special teams): It’s time to recognize Purdue’s Cody Webster, who might win the Ray Guy Award if it were handed out today. Webster continued his tremendous season by averaging 41.8 yards per punt and downing three of them inside the 20 versus Notre Dame.

Pointing up (the wrong way): In the first two rewinds of 2013, we pointed out how scoring is up in the Big Ten. In Week 3, that was also true in a negative way. Six Big Ten teams (Nebraska, Ohio State, Penn State, Wisconsin, Purdue and Illinois) gave up at least 31 points, and Michigan nearly joined them (and would have been the sixth of seven to lose if so). Offenses have improved in the league, but let’s face it: Most Big Ten teams still aren’t well-equipped to win shootouts, so the defenses need to play better.

Strangest moment, Part II: Nothing tops the end of the Wisconsin-Arizona State game for absurdity. But more strangeness occurred in the UCLA-Nebraska game, when officials signaled for a made field goal on a kick that was obviously wide right. The call was overturned on replay, but how is that missed in the first place? An Arizona State field goal early against Wisconsin was similarly odd, as it appeared to curve from out, to in, to above the right upright. Officials called it good, but it was hard to tell for sure. Both plays only added fuel to comedian Adam Carolla’s common-sense crusade to raise the darn uprights already.

Did you see? A skywriter spelled out “Go Blue” over Spartan Stadium shortly before Michigan State’s game against Youngstown State on Saturday. Who bothered to do that or why remains unclear, but as Michigan State swimming coach Matt Gianiodis tweeted: “That’s a lot of work for your 3rd biggest rival.” Maybe Michigan fans should have focused more on Akron.

Big Ten lunchtime links

September, 11, 2013
9/11/13
12:00
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