Blocking for the nation’s best group of running backs, Big Ten offensive lines fared well last season. Will 2015 serve as a reality check around the league?

As spring practice opens in Ann Arbor and Evanston this week, we’re comparing position groups around the Big Ten. Offensive line is next on the list. For others in the series, click here:

Best of the best: Michigan State

The linchpins are back in rising junior left tackle Jack Conklin and senior center Jack Allen, both of whom will land on preseason All-America teams. The pair of Jacks spearheaded the line last year as the Spartans allowed a Big Ten-low 11 sacks, converted 49.7 percent on third down (second to Ohio State) and operated more efficiently in the red zone and in goal-to-go situations than any other Big Ten team. Donavon Clark also returns at tackle. The Spartans lose left guard Travis Jackson, a second-team all-conference pick, and versatile mainstay Connor Kruse. Brian Allen, Kodi Kieler and Miguel Machado appear ready to compete. And these guys will look even better with Connor Cook in command of the offense.

Next up: Ohio State and Wisconsin

A temptation exists to rank every OSU unit as the Big Ten’s best, and the Buckeyes aren’t far off on the offensive line. They lose only right tackle Darryl Baldwin from a group that turned dominant late last season en route to clearing a path to the national title for Ezekiel Elliott and Cardale Jones. Left tackle Taylor Decker, the lone returning starter last year, ranks among the nation’s best at his position, and right guard Pat Elflein earned all-conference honors. Center Jacoby Boren and left guard Billy Price are also back as starters.

At Wisconsin, the cupboard is considerably more empty with the departure of right guard Kyle Costigan, right tackle Rob Havenstein, both All-Big Ten picks, and left guard Dallas Lewallen. Alongside the brilliance of Melvin Gordon, this was the league’s best unit last year. Center Dan Voltz and left tackle Tyler Marz return to anchor the line in 2015. Michael Deiter is ready to go as a redshirt freshman, and the Badgers will find two more starters among a promising group of youngsters.

Sleeper: Michigan

The Wolverines weren’t bad on the line last year. Seriously. OK, at least, it was an improvement over 2013, and all five starters are back to go with, presumably, a much more well designed offensive system. With left tackle Mason Cole, who played as a true freshman, guards Graham Glasgow and Kyle Kalis, center Jack Miller and right tackle Ben Braden, Michigan looks the part. New offensive coordinator and O-line coach Tim Drevno has plenty of tools with which to work. Reserves Erik Magnuson, Logan Tuley-Tillman, Blake Bars and Patrick Kugler give Michigan a chance to develop solid depth this spring. The Wolverines should be better at running back with the addition of Ty Isaac. A breakthrough season across the front isn’t out of the question.

Problem for a contender: Penn State

It was flat-out ugly last year as the Nittany Lions allowed 44 sacks, last in the Big Ten and 121st nationally, and averaged 2.94 yards per rush – 122nd nationally. PSU lost left tackle Donovan Smith early to the NFL and left guard Miles Dieffenbach. Center Angelo Mangiro and tackle Andrew Nelson lead the group of returnees, and Penn added a pair of potential difference-makers in January in freshman Sterling Jenkins and juco transfer Paris Palmer. Four freshmen redshirted last year. Really, there’s nowhere to go but up, but Penn State needs fast improvement from its line to allow QB Christian Hackenberg time to operate. If growth here is slow, so will be Penn State’s offensive progress.

B1G spring position outlook: Receivers

February, 24, 2015
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Our review of where the Big Ten teams stack up at each position group rolls on with a look at wide receivers and tight ends.

Pass-catchers were largely overshadowed by big-name running backs in the conference last season. There are a handful of receivers with star power returning in 2015, but the strongest units in the Big Ten next fall will thrive on their ability to spread the wealth to a balanced corps of playmakers in the passing game.

Best of the best: Penn State and Ohio State

The Nittany Lions return DaeSean Hamilton and Geno Lewis, both of whom looked to be headed toward 1,000-yard seasons in 2014 before an inexperienced line and struggling running game grinded Penn State’s offense to a halt. Tight end Adam Breneman missed all of his sophomore year recovering from surgery, but should be one of the conference’s best tight ends if he stays healthy in 2015. Depth will come from sophomore Saeed Blacknall and three freshmen ranked among the top 100 receivers in this year’s recruiting class.

Ohio State loses deep-ball specialist Devin Smithbut has the playmakers to replace him. Michael Thomas and Jalin Marshall will once again be standout weapons in the passing game. The late addition of incoming freshman K.J. Hill, who literally broke a defender’s ankle last fall, provides the potential for another young contributor.

Next up: Mike Riley inherits a capable duo at wide receiver with a pair of former All-Big Ten Freshmen. Junior Jordan Westerkamp caught 44 passes for 747 yards and flashed some highlight-reel ability during his sophomore season. De'Mornay Pierson-El made his biggest impact as a rookie in the return game, but should be a big part of the Cornhuskers’ offense in 2015. Losing standout Kenny Bell to the NFL is the only thing keeping this group from being at the top of the list.

Sleepers: Illinois and Rutgers

Illini freshman Mike Dudek had a standout rookie season of his own. He had six touchdowns and 1,038 receiving yards last fall. Along with seniors Geronimo Allison and Josh Ferguson, who both had more than 40 receptions last fall, quarterback Wes Lunt has the targets to sneak up on a few teams next fall.

Rutgers lacks depth is the passing game, but may have the Big Ten’s top returning receiver in Leonte Carroo (55 catches, 1,086 yards, 10 TDs in 2014). Carroo’s decision to put the NFL on hold for another year will be a major help for the Scarlet Knights, who lost junior tight end Tyler Kroft and still need time to develop the rest of a young, but potentially talented group of receivers.

Problem for a contender: Wisconsin

The Badgers finished near the bottom of the league last fall with less than 150 passing yards per game. To call their pass attack a “problem” last year wouldn’t be totally accurate. It was more of an unnecessary appendage with Melvin Gordon running wild. Gordon is gone and so are three starting offensive linemen in Paul Chryst’s first season back in Madison. The running game will still be strong, but the lack of a passing threat could be a bigger issue in 2015. The Badgers need to find more support for former walk-on Alex Erickson, the only returning receiver with more than 14 catches last year.

B1G roundtable: Coaching job with most upside?

February, 24, 2015
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What's the best coaching job in the country? Stay with ESPN.com this week for an answer as the full list of Power 5 coaching seats is unveiled.

Here at the Big Ten blog, we're getting involved by offering a look at coaching in the Big Ten. We'll offer our takes on the league's jobs.

Tuesday's roundtable topic: What Big Ten coaching job has the most upside?

Brian Bennett: Maryland

You can look at this question a number of ways. I chose to view it as a program that's not currently viewed in any way, shape or form as one of the nation's top jobs, yet has the potential for serious growth. That's why I picked the Terrapins. Granted, to do so means to ignore much of history, as Maryland's past couple of decades contain a lot of mediocrity (or worse). Ardent fan support isn't really there, either; this is anecdotal, but here at the Big Ten blog, we almost never hear a peep from Terps fans (and the ACC folks will tell you the same was true in their neighborhood).

Even still, this job has a lot of things going for it. The school is located in a fertile, if highly competitive, location for recruits. Under Armour founder Kevin Plank could be Maryland's version of Phil Knight, pouring money into the program and upping the "coolness" factor. Ralph Friedgen showed from 2001 to 2003 -- when the Terrapins went 31-8 and finished first or second in the ACC each season -- that very good things are possible in College Park under the right circumstances. It will be an uphill climb in the East Division, but the upside certainly exists.

Mitch Sherman: Penn State

The Nittany Lions haven’t gone more than five straight years without a 10-win season since the early 1960s -- a streak in jeopardy in 2015 after a tumultuous stretch in the wake of tragedy, scandal and two coaching changes. Are there 10 wins on Penn State's schedule in 2015? If coach James Franklin can fix the offense during the offseason, maybe. Regardless, Penn State is a 10-win program -- and it can reach greater heights in special seasons, which remain within reach amid the rigorous East Division. Its combination of fan support, resources, natural recruiting ground and history match that of the best programs in the Big Ten.

Three years ago, Penn State wasn’t a top-five coaching job in the league. The work of Franklin, predecessor Bill O’Brien and the school administration has repositioned the Nittany Lions to emerge from this dark period and make strides as significant as any Big Ten team during the next two to three years.

Dan Murphy: Michigan

Michigan's program isn't in the top tier of the Big Ten right now, but it offers the biggest reward for the coach who can boost this team up a level. Much like at Penn State, all of the resources (financial and human) that come with a winning tradition are in place in Ann Arbor. It only takes a little bit of momentum for those advantages to start working in Michigan's favor. If and when they do, the infrastructure is in place for the Wolverines to eventually compete for conference titles and playoff spots. The Michigan coach has opportunities to take incremental steps forward (a bowl game one season, a win over a hated rival the next, etc.) to keep that momentum rolling in the right direction. Jim Harbaugh is already considered one of the top coaches in the game, but a speedy turnaround at Michigan would launch him to exalted status in the Mitten State.

Big Ten morning links

February, 24, 2015
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Spring football starts Tuesday at Michigan, where temperatures are forecast to dip below zero each of the next three nights.

Why do I feel like everyone on Twitter is talking to Jim Harbaugh these days?



The Wolverines will be warm and cozy at practice inside Al Glick Field House. Northwestern also starts this week. Maryland, Minnesota and Nebraska open drills next week, which makes now as good a time as any to review staff openings around the Big Ten.

Presumably, all 14 programs will get back to full strength for spring practice. For now, three teams remain down a man.

Since we last took a divisional look at offseason changes in the East and the West, Nebraska and Wisconsin lost assistant coaches. Brian Stewart left Maryland as defensive coordinator to take the opening at Nebraska.

And Purdue hired Terry Malone over the weekend to coach tight ends.

Malone made it to a 6 a.m. workout Monday with the Boilermakers.

He is an intriguing hire for Purdue. Most recently the tight ends coach of the New Orleans Saints, where he was instrumental in the development of 2013 first-team All-Pro pick Jimmy Graham, Malone coordinated Michigan's offense from 2002-05 and also worked under Lloyd Carr as offensive line coach.

Michigan won five league crowns in Malone's nine seasons. He brings an NFL pedigree and a history of success in the Big Ten. Pretty good place to start for the Boilermakers, who have won one Big Ten game in two seasons under coach Darrell Hazell.

The imminent Stewart hire at Nebraska, to replace Charlton Warren as secondary coach, also makes sense for Mike Riley, who generally picks coaches that he or his assistants know. Stewart served a solid stint in 2007-08 with the Dallas Cowboys as defensive coordinator. Also on that Dallas staff was Bruce Read, Nebraska's special teams coach and a longtime Riley assistant.

Stewart is a San Diego native and coached the secondary for the Chargers before his stint in Dallas; Riley, former head coach of the Chargers, and his staff have numerous San Diego ties.

Of little relevance, Stewart, as the Cowboys coordinator, succeeded Mike Zimmer, who -- after the 2003 season -- interviewed for the Nebraska head-coaching job. It went to Bill Callahan, who spent 2012-14 with the Cowboys.

And of minor relevance, Stewart would be the only full-time member of the Nebraska staff to coach a game at Memorial Stadium. He spent three seasons at Missouri, losing to the Huskers in 1996 and 2000 in Lincoln and in 1999 at Mizzou.

Here's a rundown of the programs with open positions:
  • Illinois still has an opening after the January firing of two assistant coaches. The spot yet to be filled was vacated by special teams coach Tim Salem, though coach Tim Beckman might hire for a different position. Beckman said recently that he had interviewed internal candidates and likely would assign Alex Golesh, the Fighting Illini recruiting coordinator who worked last season with running backs and tight ends, to handle a heavy load on special teams next season.

  • Maryland needs an assistant to replace Stewart. Inside linebackers coach Keith Dudzinski was promoted to defensive coordinator.

  • Wisconsin must hire a running backs coach to replace Thomas Brown, who left for alma mater, Georgia. John Settle, who coached the position for the Badgers from 2006-10 and for Wisconsin coach Paul Chryst at Pittsburgh last season, has been mentioned in reports as a candidate.
Let's get to the links:
It's here. Spring practice in the Big Ten starts this week. Michigan opens Tuesday; Northwestern begins Wednesday. Right on time, we’ll examine the Big Ten’s position groups.

Let’s get started with a look at the league’s quarterbacks – always the premier position but especially in 2015 as the Big Ten looks likely next year place a quarterback in the opening round of the NFL draft for the first time since Kerry Collins in 1995. Only Rutgers, Maryland, Michigan and Northwestern are replacing starters, and nine teams return a quarterback with more than one year of experience as the man in charge.

Intriguing storylines abound.

Best of the best: Ohio State and Michigan State

Any conversation about Big Ten quarterbacks begins with the Buckeyes and their three-headed monster of Braxton Miller, J.T. Barrett and Cardale Jones. We won’t go in depth on the trio, but know this: Ohio State would be favored by many to repeat as national champion with any of three at the helm next fall. Miller and Barrett, of course, must return to good health after the spring. Health is not a concern for the Spartans, who have a bonafide star in rising senior Connor Cook. Cook could have made a splash in the draft this year but opted to return after throwing for 24 touchdowns and 3,214 yards last season in leading MSU to a second straight top-five finish. As long as he’s at the helm, Michigan State won’t be far from the national spotlight.

Next up: Penn State and Nebraska

The numbers aren’t over-the-top great for Christian Hackenberg, who took a step back statistically as a sophomore with 12 touchdowns and 15 interceptions. His completion percentage of 55.8 also dropped, but Hackenberg remains arguably the most physically gifted Big Ten QB. And if Penn State improves on the offensive line, a breakout season would surprise few. The situation is more murky for Tommy Armstrong Jr. and the Huskers. He must first win the job over inexperienced contenders as new coach Mike Riley takes stock of talent in the spring. But for Armstrong, the ceiling is high. He started eight games as a redshirt freshman, then threw for 2,695 yards and rushed for 705 last year. Armstrong still fought consistency but displayed big-play skills in accounting for more than 400 yards in the Huskers’ Holiday Bowl loss to USC.

Sleeper: Indiana

Don’t forget about Nate Sudfeld, back from surgery on his non-throwing, left shoulder to reclaim the starting position for a third season. He threw for 2,523 yards in 2013 and started well last fall, leading a late drive to beat Missouri before he was hurt against Iowa. Sudfeld’s absence crippled the IU offense, which got a boost this offseason with the transfer of a Jordan Howard and Marqui Hawkins, a dynamic running back-receiver combo from UAB. It’s up to Sudfeld to make the pieces fit and carry the Hoosiers back to a bowl game.

Problem for a contender: Wisconsin

New coach Paul Chryst inherits an interesting situation with Joel Stave, who missed the first four games of his junior season with a case of the yips. After his Octoer return, Stave rarely showed the poise from his first year as a starter in 2013. He completed 61.9 percent of his throws as a sophomore; it was just 53.4 last year with nine touchdowns and 10 interceptions. For some, patience has worn thin for Stave, who must adjust to life without Melvin Gordon in the backfield. Still, he looks like the Badgers’ best option unless someone emerges this spring from the group of Tanner McEvoy, who could move back to defense, Bart Houston or freshmen Austin Kafentzis and Alex Hornibrook.
video

Penn State students participated in a fully student-run dance marathon, raising $13 million for families with kids fighting pediatric cancer, and ESPN's John Buccigross gave a nod to all the effort put forth for his 'Bucci's Star' segment.

Big Ten morning links

February, 20, 2015
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The Big Ten is gauging its member schools’ interest in making freshmen ineligible, joining other Power 5 leagues that have at least kicked the thought around.

Is it an idea whose time has come? Or an old approach that doesn’t reflect modern realities?

Unless and until more details emerge, I would lean toward the latter.

First of all, freshmen ineligibility in men’s basketball is a non-starter without a change in the NBA age-limit rule or the creation of a better non-college option than the D-league. You only have to look at Duke, Kentucky, or Ohio State to realize there are true freshmen right now who are plenty good enough to be in the NBA, and restricting them from playing in college or at that level for a year would be unfair.

Things are different in college football, where a lot of players redshirt their first year anyway. But it’s also true that many are ready to contribute as true freshmen. Justin Jackson, Mikey Dudek, Mason Cole, and De'Mornay Pierson-El are just a few names of true freshmen who made a major impact last season in the Big Ten. (No wonder Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith opposes freshmen ineligibility, since Buckeyes coach Urban Meyer says he doesn’t redshirt.)

Of course, the rule would be more about preparing players for the academic rigors of college than performing on the field. At the same time, however, teams are always going to bring in borderline students or even academic risks who have exceptional talent. Will a year off really make a huge difference for those types of players? How do you keep them engaged in school and the team when the reward of games has been removed for a year? Would players automatically get a sixth year if they need a medical redshirt later in their careers? What about transfers? And would you really want to see big-time stars -- like, say, Joey Bosa and Christian Hackenberg -- potentially jump to the NFL after only two seasons of playing for your team?

The sport's leaders should be lauded for trying to find ways to emphasize the college part of college football. Yet it's the uniquely American and mostly illogical practice of turning our universities into quasi-minor league teams that is the intractable problem. Making freshmen ineligible raises as many questions as it might solve.

Maryland changes defensive coordinators

Give the Terrapins points for stealth. Few people forecast the change Maryland made on Thursday, when it replaced defensive coordinator Brian Stewart with inside linebackers coach Keith Dudzinski.

The official Terrapins company line was that the team and Stewart agreed to "mutually part ways." But given that Stewart was handed a multi-year contract extension just 13 months ago, it’s hard to believe the decision wasn't more one-sided than that.

Stewart has a strong track record and was mentioned as a candidate for Tulsa’s head coaching job in December. Yet his defenses in College Park got a little worse each of the past three years. Despite some individual standouts on last season’s unit -- like defensive end Andre Monroe, cornerback Will Likely and linebacker Cole Farrand -- the Terps finished 95th in the FBS in yards allowed and tied for 87th in points allowed (30.2). The defense completely collapsed in the second half against Rutgers in the season finale, and gave up 45 points to Stanford in the Foster Farms Bowl.

Stewart will land on his feet and might already have another job lined up. Dudzinski, a coaching veteran who ran defenses at smaller schools in the Northeast earlier in his career, now has the task of reshaping this Terrapins defense that will break in almost an entirely new starting front seven this spring.

Elsewhere in the Big Ten ...
BRADENTON, Fla. -- In the 2015 class, IMG Academy had 12 prospects sign with FBS programs, including eight spread over four of the Power 5 conferences. That was a mere warmup compared to the Class of 2016.

The junior class at IMG Academy features a whopping eight prospects in the ESPN Junior 300, headlined by No. 2 Shavar Manuel and No. 3 and Florida State quarterback commit Malik Henry, along with No. 19 Saivion Smith and Florida State commit Isaac Nauta. Add in cornerback Khalil Ladler, outside linebacker Rahshaun Smith, No. 128 and Clemson wide receiver verbal Tavares Chase and Ohio State pledge Tyler Gerald and the quickly growing football program is officially among the nation's elite.

On Monday, RecruitingNation spent a few hours on campus to get the latest.

Big Ten morning links

February, 19, 2015
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It's cold. I'm cranky. Let's get on with this. Seriously, is it almost spring?

Purdue is lowering season-ticket prices for nearly 90 percent of the seats at Ross-Ade Stadium in 2015. You can get a ticket to seven home games for less than $100 after attendance dropped in 2014 by 28 percent to 35,269 per game -- the lowest figure since 1951, according to the Lafayette Journal and Courier.

The university issued a news release Wednesday, quoting athletics director Morgan Burke, who opened with this: "We want our fans back."

Hey, at least he's not sugar-coating it.

The Boilermakers have won four games since Darrell Hazell took over two years ago, including one in Big Ten play – and it came on the road at Illinois last year.

If you wondered about the importance of next season for the third-year coach, wonder no more.

Meanwhile, at Ohio State, they're dropping ticket prices, too, though not quite like Purdue. The national champs are rolling prices to 2010 for the April 18 spring game to $5 per seat.

Five bucks to see the Bucks -- that's the best deal in the Big Ten. Apparently, this is happening in response to last year, when OSU tried to charge $20 a seat for the spring game, only to slash prices at the last minute.

Or maybe Ohio State is just preparing its fans for the letdown of a scrimmage without Braxton Miller and J.T. Barrett.

I admit, if I followed Dwayne Haskins Jr., the nation's No. 2-rated pocket-passer quarterbacl, on Twitter, I would not have understood his reference to Maryland's tribute to a Drake album cover.

I thought Drake was an FCS program in Des Moines. So yeah, I'm out of touch with some of these kids. Fortunately, people exist in the media out there who can explain this stuff to me.

Now, Jameis Winston and Bryce Petty are talking up Michigan's facilities and coach Jim Harbaugh in a part-genius, part-propaganda campaign by the Wolverines with two of the nation's premier quarterback prospects for the NFL draft.

If you didn't already notice, Winston and Petty visited Ann Arbor this week to work out at Al Glick Fieldhouse and meet with Harbaugh in advance of the NFL combine.

They attended a basketball game, and Winston gushed over Harbaugh on camera for the school-run website, saying, "I wish I could have played for" the former 49ers coach.

Harbaugh and George Whitfield, personal coach for Winston and Petty, have some history together; Whitfield served as an intern with the 49ers last year.

Curious minds want to know: What do Jimbo Fisher and Art Briles think of this little exercise?

On with the rest of the links:
Earlier today we took an extensive look at the potential changes to the college football recruiting calendar and their impact on the Big Ten. The league's football coaches spent a portion of their annual business meetings Feb. 8-9 on the likelihood of the signing date moving to December, and whether official visits also could or should be moved to late spring or early summer.

You might be wondering: Does this really matter? The answer is yes, especially for a certain group of Big Ten schools. We answer that question and others relating to these topics below.

Why is this so important for the Big Ten?

Several Big Ten teams face a major disadvantage in recruiting because their campuses are located far from the concentrations of top prospects. The challenge is amplified by a recruiting environment where players are making their college choices earlier and most likely will soon having a chance to sign earlier. If the official visits calendar doesn't change, certain Big Ten programs won't be able to pay for prospects from recruiting concentrations to visit their campuses, forcing the prospects to make long trips on their own dime. Bottom line: an already tenuous situation could become much worse.

Which programs are affected most by the proposed recruiting calendar?

The West Division teams located farther from recruit concentrations. Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin seem particularly vulnerable. Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez told ESPN.com that the school doesn't have trouble getting prospects to visit unofficially, even those from far-flung locations. But some of these programs could fall further behind in the recruiting race if early official visits don't accompany an early signing date.

What must happen for early official visits to gain traction?

The Big Ten schools who need the change must push for them, and Nebraska is best positioned take the lead. Although leagues such as the SEC, Big 12 and ACC likely won't support early official visits, the Big Ten could drum up some support with the Pac-12, which has several members located far from recruit concentrations. Every FBS conference votes on the recruiting calendar, so the Big Ten also could find allies with Group of 5 leagues such as the Mid-American. A proposal for early official visits wouldn't go to a vote until spring 2016 at the earliest, so it wouldn't be in effect until the 2017 recruiting cycle.

Why isn't there more support for early visits nationally?

It's pretty simple. Schools and conferences look out for their own interests. Even within the Big Ten, good luck convincing Rutgers and Maryland that it's a good idea to provide a new edge in recruiting for league rivals. In the SEC -- and parts of the Big 12, Pac-12 and ACC -- many of the top recruiting targets can simply drive to campus in the spring or summer for unofficial visits. Official visits, at some schools, have become an afterthought. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith raises some interesting points about the importance of vacation time for coaches in the summer. But that's not a major obstacle. With June set aside for camps and official visits, coaches could still take plenty of vacation time in July -- not that many of them would take it.

Realistically, what would happen if the early signing period passes without early visits?

In the short term, probably not much. Coaches at the most impacted Big Ten West schools would work harder during the season to secure official visits. They'd load up on visitors in the short time in December before the signing date and make the best of a bad situation. Over the long haul, though, damage would be noticeable in the workload placed on coaches and the quality of recruiting classes. It's hard to imagine a scenario in which the December period, if passed, would not grow in popularity among recruits. Some administrators point to basketball, which offers an early signing period in November and still makes use of an April period. Football recruiting is a different animal, though; the hype around signing day ensures it.

Envision the next frontier in recruiting. It's 2017. An early signing period -- likely to receive approval this year from the FBS conference commissioners -- has been in place for two cycles in recruiting.

Now check the pulse of your program.

How much can change in two years? What's the potential impact of two compromised classes for a group of schools that don't enjoy the advantages of the elite programs in recruiting?

As the Big Ten throws its support behind a three-day December window for prospects to sign letters of intent -- without an accompanying change by the NCAA to institute earlier official visits -- geographically isolated schools like Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and others nationally must consider a painful reality that strikes at the heart of the rich-getting-richer debate central to college football.

In advance of the June vote of conference commissioners on whether to have an early signing period to supplement the existing February date, Big Ten coaches and administrators met this month to discuss the proposal. The plan is designed to ease financial and time burdens on coaches and to keep pace with the accelerated recruiting cycle. If passed, it would allow prospects, on a two-year trial basis, to sign Dec. 16-18.

Commissioner Jim Delany said a "strong majority" to support the proposal exists among Big Ten schools, which form one of the wealthiest and most influential conferences nationally, yet offer a study in contrast amid the game's recruiting subculture.

And out of the meeting, a second conversation emerged, perhaps more integral to the Big Ten's competitive balance than an early signing period: the need for early official visits, which appears much less likely to pass.

That won't stop some Big Ten coaches who are already at a recruiting disadvantage from pushing hard for early visits.


(Read full post)


Ultimate ESPN 300 roundtable: Most impactful B1G recruit

February, 18, 2015
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By now, you've surely seen the Ultimate ESPN 300, a list of the 300 most impactful players based on both high school and college production. The list considered players whom ESPN evaluated at both levels, so while not all 300 players were highly rated in high school, they were all somewhat known commodities.

We're all about the Big Ten here, so in the next three days we'll debate how the Ultimate ESPN 300 factors into this corner of college football.

Wednesday's roundtable topic: Which player had the biggest impact on a Big Ten program?

Adam Rittenberg: Chris Borland, Wisconsin linebacker, No. 143

Impact can be hard to quantify, as there are so many factors involved. I nearly went with former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor, who impacted Ohio State both positively (fans often forget how good he was in bowl games and big games) and negatively during a wild career. I also tried to find players who seemed like he played college ball for seven or eight years. Borland was one of those players. He was so good for so long, winning Big Ten freshman of the year in 2009 and Big Ten defensive player of the year in 2013. He overcame adversity, missing most of 2010 with a shoulder injury. He earned All-Big Ten honors -- coaches or media -- in all four full seasons he played.

Borland also is the quintessential Wisconsin star: an undersized, freakish athlete who grew up playing soccer and was overlooked in recruiting. He contributed from the moment he arrived in Madison and played in four bowl games and three Big Ten championship games. Although Wisconsin had more nationally famous players on the Ultimate 300 list -- J.J. Watt (No. 271), Russell Wilson (No. 187), Melvin Gordon (No. 53), Montee Ball (No. 136) -- Borland's overall legacy as a Badger trumps them all.

Brian Bennett: Christian Hackenberg, Penn State quarterback, No. 71

My choice is a little unorthodox and not entirely based on what the player has done -- yet -- on the field. I'm going with Penn State's Hackenberg. He committed to Penn State after the Jerry Sandusky scandal broke and stayed with the Nittany Lions even after the NCAA tried to decimate the program with scholarship reductions and a bowl ban. He could have easily gone somewhere else, but his faithfulness in Bill O'Brien and the program signaled to other players that it was OK to stick things out with Penn State.

Hackenberg was the Big Ten's freshman of the year in 2013 and, despite some struggles as a sophomore, still helped lead the Nittany Lions back to a bowl last season. He's got at least one more year in State College to show off his talent. Penn State fans should already be thankful for what he (and let's not forget No. 294, Michael Mauti) did to keep the entire program afloat.

Mitch Sherman: Joey Bosa, Ohio State defensive end, No. 58

What more could one guy do from his position than Bosa in helping lead the Buckeyes romp to a Big Ten title and the first College Football Playoff championship? Sure, the Ohio State quarterbacks and running back Ezekiel Elliott got many of the headlines – and deservedly so – during the 2014 championship run. But Bosa dominated from the first game of the season at defensive end, collecting 13.5 sacks and 21.5 tackles behind the line of scrimmage.

His Big Ten-best four forced fumbles led directly to 30 Ohio State points. And he did it, as a true sophomore, without fellow bookend Noah Spence, dismissed after All-Big Ten season in 2013. Opponents feared Bosa. His presence changed games. And nothing seemed to bother him. He was simply the best player on the best team in the country for the longest portion of last season.
The Ultimate ESPN 300 list is loaded with intriguing stories. From unheralded players rising to the top to players not yet reaching their potential, the list has everything. To outline a few of those intriguing players, here is a look at the top five within the Big Ten:


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Big Ten morning links

February, 18, 2015
Feb 18
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Jim Harbaugh ... quarterback whisperer?

Such was the implication when it was revealed on Tuesday that the new Michigan coach was in Ann Arbor helping former Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston and ex-Baylor star Bryce Petty prepare for this week’s NFL combine.



It turns out that Winston and Petty were directed to Michigan via quarterback guru George Whitfield after training in San Diego in order to get acclimated to the time zone and weather and throwing in an indoor facility before they head to Indianapolis. (Though why they'd need to adjust to the weather is a mystery). Harbaugh and Wolverines quarterbacks coach Jedd Fisch met with both players on campus.

Though it was a bit odd to see players from other schools get advice from Harbaugh, it was also brilliant in many ways. Harbaugh has a great and well-deserved reputation for developing quarterbacks and understanding the position, given his playing career and previous players he has coached. This will merely enhance the perception of him as a teacher of quarterbacks, especially given that Winston could be the No. 1 player taken in the draft.

And what's Michigan's biggest need right now? Developing a quarterback, naturally. Despite getting a very late start in recruiting this year, Harbaugh was able to flip Zach Gentry away from his Texas commitment based no doubt largely on Harbaugh's track record. The Wolverines are in hot pursuit of more star quarterbacks in the 2016 class. It sure doesn't hurt for prospects out there to see these images of Harbaugh bestowing his wisdom on future NFL quarterbacks. (And it was probably also no coincidence that Petty and Winston were at the Michigan State-Michigan game in Crisler Arena at the same time as a bunch of important in-state recruits).

Of course, the guy who Harbaugh will be chasing, Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer, is viewed as one of the best developers of quarterbacks in the business. If there was ever any doubt about that, Meyer showed it last season with how both J.T. Barrett and Cardale Jones were able to take over at a moment's notice.

Two other new head coaches in the Big Ten, Nebraska's Mike Riley and Wisconsin's Paul Chryst, have earned praise in the past for their ability to teach quarterback play. That's a great harbinger for the league's future, since the most important position on the field seemed to slide a bit in recent years throughout the conference. Now, though, the Big Ten might just be flush with quarterback whisperers.

Around the league ...
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