Ohio State Buckeyes: Jim Tressel

Big Ten lunch links

June, 12, 2014
Jun 12
12:00
PM ET
Cows don't look like cows on film. You gotta use horses.
Big Ten writers Adam Rittenberg and Brian Bennett occasionally will give their takes on a burning question facing the league. We'll both have strong opinions, but not necessarily the same view. We'll let you decide which writer is correct.

Cleveland.com recently completed its three-year retrospective on Ohio State's tattoo/merchandise scandal with a story about Terrelle Pryor. The former Buckeyes quarterback, who committed multiple NCAA violations, departed the program in June 2011, a week after coach Jim Tressel resigned under pressure. In July 2011, Ohio State declared Pryor ineligible for the 2011 season and banned the quarterback from any association with the program for five years, citing his unwillingness to cooperate with school and NCAA investigators.

[+] EnlargeTerrelle Pryor
Kevin C. Cox/Getty ImagesFormer Buckeyes quarterback Terrelle Pryor wants to reconcile with Ohio State. Does the school want the same?
Pryor would one day like to reconcile with his old school:
"I'd love to, if I'm invited or accepted, I'd love to. I don't want to cause any type of thing. I just want everything to be smooth. Even if I could talk to the guys about not taking things and being smart about the people you deal with, I'd love to do that one day, if the coaches are up to it or the head people at Ohio State are up to it. But that's a couple years away."
Today's Take Two topic: Should Ohio State reopen its doors to Pryor after the five-year ban expires in 2016?

Take 1: Adam Rittenberg

The wound is still fresh for some Buckeyes fans, who regard Pryor a half-step above anyone associated with the University of Michigan. His actions contributed to the program's backslide -- Ohio State hasn't won a Big Ten title or a bowl since Pryor's final game in January 2011 -- but he's hardly the only one at fault. Pryor isn't the reason Tressel had to resign. Tressel made poor decisions that led to his resignation, and while he certainly felt an attachment to Pryor -- he does to this day -- that's not Pryor's fault.

Ohio State received a bowl ban because of its casual approach to the NCAA infractions process, and the second wave of allegations that arrived in the fall of 2011. Pryor was a highly immature, overly entitled player who made some very poor choices during his Buckeyes career. But this scandal went way beyond one person.

Pryor absolutely should be welcomed back to the program after five years. Americans are typically a forgiving lot, and college football fans have forgiven a lot worse characters than Terrelle Pryor. He never committed a violent crime. He never had academic issues and actually was an Academic All-Big Ten selection at Ohio State. He said and did some stupid things at Ohio State, but he also helped the Buckeyes win a lot of games and excelled in BCS bowls, especially the 2010 Rose Bowl.

At some point, Pryor should walk through the doors of the Woody Hayes Athletic Center again. While I wonder about his maturity, his story could be a cautionary tale for the current players who face constant temptation in a city obsessed with Buckeyes football. There's value in a reconciliation, and I hope to see it happen.

Take 2: Brian Bennett

Time heals all wounds. I was at the Michigan game in 2012 when Tressel got a loud, standing ovation from the crowd at the 'Shoe, even though he was the very person most responsible for that being Ohio State's final game and not a possible entry point toward a championship run. Of course, Tressel had built up more goodwill than Pryor, but it showed that Ohio State fans are willing to forgive one of their own.

It also helps that Pryor's mistakes didn't doom the program. Sure, the 2011 season was one of the worst in recent Buckeyes history, but they still went to a bowl and then bounced right back after hiring Urban Meyer by going on a 24-game winning streak. The tattoo scandal seems rather petty in hindsight, especially in light of all the calls for more money and benefits for college athletes that are dominating the landscape right now. Pryor has appeared to be a solid citizen since leaving Ohio State and even has made an impact in the NFL.

His No. 2 is never going to be retired, and maybe Pryor will never receive more than polite applause if he returns to an Ohio State sideline someday. But there's no need for him to be a complete pariah when his disassociation with the program concludes. If you're going to talk about a football program being a family, then you're going to have to accept some family members who have been difficult to love at times. And maybe most importantly, Pryor can offer some life lessons to younger Buckeyes players and hopefully help them avoid some of the same mistakes that stained an otherwise successful career.

Big Ten lunch links

June, 2, 2014
Jun 2
12:00
PM ET
Chicago Blackhawks -- One Goal (Away). So close. But congrats to the Kings, a more resilient team.

Links time ...

Big Ten's lunch links

May, 23, 2014
May 23
12:00
PM ET
Looking for a stylish addition to your home? Consider this.



Big Ten lunch links

May, 13, 2014
May 13
12:00
PM ET
Big Ten athletic directors' meetings are under way at league headquarters. Check back for updates throughout the week.

Link time ...

Big Ten Monday mailblog

May, 12, 2014
May 12
5:00
PM ET
Filling in for the vacationing Brian Bennett on today's mailblog. Because of Big Ten athletic directors' meetings Tuesday and Wednesday, my next mailblog will come to you at the usual time Friday afternoon. Send questions here or tweet 'em at me here.

Let's get going ...

Glenn from Vancouver writes: What the heck happened to Max Bullough? Four on the draft depth chart and eight ILBs taken in the draft. Presumably everyone interested in him asked what happened with the Rose Bowl suspension so either he refused to answer the question or the answer was unacceptable. Thoughts?

Adam Rittenberg: Always great to hear from one of my favorite North American cities, Glenn. The Rose Bowl suspension undoubtedly hurt Bullough, but he also showed up to the East-West Shrine Game much heavier than he played during the season. It seems like NFL teams went for speed and versatility at linebacker more than college production. Wisconsin's Chris Borland also went later than expected, and Iowa's James Morris, like Bullough, wasn't drafted. But not to see Bullough anywhere in seven rounds of the draft was a shock.




Jim from Baton Rouge, La., writes: Your commentary about Coach Tressel becoming YSU's President seems trite to me. At face value, it succeeds only by reducing the role of the Office to one of fundraising. And, Tressel is not a professional fundraiser, e.g., a certified one. He is not even a successful previously employed fundraiser. I find your consideration of the role of an accredited university president embarrassing, of the office, the school, the reader, and the writer.

Adam Rittenberg: Jim, university presidents obviously do much more than fundraising, but to think fundraising isn't the main thrust of their jobs is naive. That's how schools grow and, in some cases, how they survive. You say Tressel has no professional fundraising experience. You think football coaches don't schmooze university donors? C'mon, Jim. Tressel is an instantly recognizable figure, especially in northeast Ohio. He knows how to connect with large groups and, in my opinion, will be able to reach out to more potential donors than a standard university president whom many don't know.

Also, Tressel gained important experience in the university setting the past two years at Akron. From my story on him in November:
Tressel oversees areas like admissions and recruitment, academic support, retention, financial aid and the career center.

He made major changes to the way Akron attracts, admits, educates and advises students. As of last week, Akron had received about 3,000 more freshman applications than it had the previous year, an increase of 52 percent. Tressel moved the career center from a far-flung location to the middle of the student union. He set up the Roo Crew, which connects alumni and others around the university community with current students to assist with job placement. More than 700 alumni are part of the group.

Tressel isn't a traditional hire, but he can succeed in this role, whether folks want to admit it or not.




Matt from Des Moines, Iowa, writes: In Friday's mailbag, Shane from Maine asked about Iowa’s schedule and the opportunity to run the table. In your response, which as an honest fan I totally agree with, you said they will lose some close games and have a 9-10 win season. So looking through the schedule and your prediction, and obviously before that one if two losses is coming from either Nebraska or Wisconsin. My question for you is which of those two is more likely to beat the Hawks this year? And lastly, one team aside from these two to beat the Hawks?

Adam Rittenberg: Matt, both games will be tough for Iowa, but I'm going to go with Nebraska because there are more certainties about the Huskers than the Badgers at this point. Nebraska will be out to avenge last year's blowout home loss to Iowa, and the Huskers should be able to match up better with Iowa at the line of scrimmage. I'm not knocking Wisconsin, but I just have a lot of questions about the Badgers right now. They should figure things out by the Nov. 22 trip to Kinnick, but we'll see. Pitt could be a tough early season trip for Iowa, as the Panthers are on the rise. Northwestern always plays Iowa tough and easily could have won last year's game. The Minnesota trip is another tricky game, although Iowa dominated at TCF Bank Stadium last year.




@HoosierHolmes via Twitter asks: How do you see IU's offense adjusting to losing 3 of its top WR's and top TE?

Adam Rittenberg: It feels odd that wide receiver/tight end will be a question mark for the Hoosiers, as the program has been good at both spots, but there are some major voids right now. IU needs a huge year from Shane Wynn, who has explosive ability. The key will be filling spots on the outside, whether it's a veteran like Nick Stoner or Isaiah Roundtree, or a younger player like freshman Dominique Booth. Also, keep an eye on Isaac Griffith, who was impressing people before his swimming accident and could become a great story this season.




Shelby from Dallas writes: How important is the App. State game this year for Michigan? Will a win just suffice or do they need to dominate from wire to wire to erase the bad taste in their mouth from last time they met?

Adam Rittenberg: Shelby, none of the current Michigan players or coaches was part of the Appalachian State game in 2007, so I don't know if the revenge factor matters. But the Wolverines absolutely need a strong showing in the opener, especially with the questions about the offense that persisted during spring practice. The offensive line needs to dominate, Derrick Green and others need to run the ball and quarterback Devin Gardner needs to play a smart game. Michigan has a Week 2 trip to Notre Dame and needs to head there with some confidence. Keep in mind, too, that this Appalachian State team isn't nearly as strong as the 2007 version.


Several coaches close to Jim Tressel whom I spoke to for this story in November held out hope that he would one day return to the sideline.

They also knew his interest in education -- teaching, mentoring and administration -- wasn't just something to fill his days until the next coaching opportunity came along. Tressel was mentioned as a candidate to join Jim Caldwell's staff with the Detroit Lions in January, but he stayed at Akron as the school's vice president for student success and soon applied for the president positions at both Akron and Youngstown State, where he coached from 1986 to 2000 and won four Division I-AA national championships.

Akron selected another candidate on Thursday, but Youngstown State's trustees on Friday voted to offer the position to Tressel. He had been one of three finalists at both schools.

"Mr. Tressel has the personality and leadership skills, in addition to widespread community support, to dramatically raise YSU’s profile and prominence across Ohio and the nation," Youngstown State board of trustees chairman Sudershan Garg said in a statement.

Tressel's appointment won't be finalized until contract terms are reached.

Earlier this month at a public forum in Youngstown, Tressel told a questioner that his coaching days are over.

He left the door open a little more when we spoke in November, but his interest in education came across as sincere, including how he taught a coaching staff with Jim Dennison and how he interacted with students around campus.

"We're mediocre in the world in education," Tressel told me. "We're not at the top of the heap. I don't like being mediocre. I want every kid to get that job they're looking for. It drives you every day to figure out how we can get 26,000 to 27,000 kids to succeed. That's as tough of a game as there is."

Tressel's coaching friends wanted him back in the game, not just because of the success he had but because of the way things ended at Ohio State. But his own pull to the sideline didn't seem as strong.

He wasn't overtly bitter about Ohio State, and while he still spends much of the fall around football, he seemed to get his competitive fill from being a top administrator at Akron.

"Jim is a lot more comfortable in a shirt and tie than most coaches," Akron coach Terry Bowden said. "I don't think there are many coaches in the country that are as comfortable in the administrative side of colleges as Jim Tressel. So I wouldn't be surprised if that's where he finishes his career."

It appears that will be the case. Tressel knows Youngstown and immediately enhances the school's profile as president. The job is largely about fundraising, an area where he will undoubtedly excel.

Tressel has trouble spots in his past, including some during his coaching tenure at Youngstown State. People remember Ray Isaac and Maurice Clarett and the Tat-5 scandal. Tressel is still under a show-cause penalty from the NCAA. These issues will be brought up as he begins his new role.

But college presidents aren't saints. Neither are coaches, despite the image Tressel often portrayed. Tressel has his flaws, but I found it interesting that two of his former players he talks to the most -- Clarett and Terrelle Pryor -- are the ones who most damaged his reputation. You can't say he doesn't care about helping people.

Bottom line: You look at what college presidents do and where the job will be, and Tressel looks like a good fit. He reportedly wanted the Youngstown job more than the Akron one, and he remains extremely popular in the Youngstown community.

He has turned a page on his career. So should we.

Big Ten lunch links

May, 9, 2014
May 9
12:00
PM ET
Fourteen Big Ten programs combined to produce four first-round NFL draft picks. Louisville, Northern Illinois and Buffalo together had five. Eleven of 32 came from the SEC. Discuss.
  • A big night at the NFL draft for Michigan's Taylor Lewan, who landed with the Titans at No. 11 to lead off a better opening day for the league.
  • Ohio State's defensive duo, Ryan Shazier at No. 15 to the Steelers and Bradley Roby at No. 31, went to the Broncos.
  • And Michigan State's Darqueze Dennard found a home with the Bengals at No. 24.
  • Michigan’s other offensive tackle, Michael Schofield, has used a family struggle as his motivation to prepare for this draft.
  • Former Indiana receiver Cody Latimer went to New York to hear his name called at the draft. He’s still waiting.
  • Also waiting, defensive tackle Ra'Shede Hagemen of Minnesota, which hasn’t had a player drafted since Eric Decker in 2010. And the wait is almost over, too, for Wisconsin’s Chris Borland.
  • Tracking the Maryland prospects for the second through seventh rounds.
  • Meanwhile, Purdue’s 15-year streak of landing at least one player in the draft is in jeopardy.
  • Former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel lands the presidency at Youngstown State after he was bypassedat the University of Akron.
  • What to do this offseason? Shane Morris can play catch ... with himself.
  • Michigan State appears interested in the younger brother of tight end Dylan Chmura.
  • James Franklin and the Penn State coaches continue their 17-stop caravan in Pittsburgh. Can the grayshirting of recruits help PSU overcome its scholarship limitations.
  • Former Rutgers quarterback Tom Savage earns the endorsement of ex-coach Greg Schiano.
  • Former Nebraska quarterback Joe Ganz will remain on staff in 2014 as a graduate assistant. An appeal is deniedfor the summer jail sentence in Colorado for offensive tackle Alex Lewis is denied.
  • Minnesota loses a backup defensive lineman to North Dakota.
  • Kirk Ferentz marches to the beat of his own drum in recruiting, but even he occasionally extends a scholarship offer to a high school freshman.

Big Ten's lunch links

May, 6, 2014
May 6
12:00
PM ET
Hodor.

Big Ten's lunch links

May, 1, 2014
May 1
12:00
PM ET
Howdy, May. There goes one more month out of the way before football season starts for real.
  • Michigan has an established weapon in Devin Funchess and a future star in Freddy Canteen, but questions still remain about the targets for the passing game.
  • The relationship began with a somewhat unusual request, and after 10 years together, Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio reflects on his time with Pat Narduzzi.
  • David Jones writes that hiring James Franklin was a risk, and the developments this week suggest there's at least a chance more things could pop up with the Penn State coach.
  • Nick Saban went out of his way to praise the Big Ten and made sure he was quoted doing so during a stop in Ohio.
  • Get to know one of Ohio State's most valuable weapons on the recruiting trail -- a graphic designer.
  • Part of the apparent down cycle for the Big Ten can be traced to the ups and downs of the 2010 recruiting classes across the league. Sam McKewon takes a detailed look at the hits and misses.
  • A former Rutgers wide receiver is trying to make an impact elsewhere in the league, and Miles Shuler appears to be on track to give Northwestern a boost on offense.
  • Wisconsin would have preferred to keep its director of football operations, but now it will have to move quickly to fill a very important job to Gary Andersen.
  • The 2013 signing class is already starting to fill out the depth chart at Iowa.
  • Former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel is scheduled for a public forum at Akron in his bid for the school's presidency.

Big Ten Tuesday mailblog

April, 22, 2014
Apr 22
5:00
PM ET
Prime-time schedule angst? Oh, there's plenty. The floor is yours.

Follow us.

[+] EnlargeWisconsin Celebration
Mike McGinnis/Getty ImagesWill Melvin Gordon's Heisman chances be affected by the lack of prime-time games in November?
Jackie from NYC writes: I think the biggest loser in the prime-time schedule is Melvin Gordon. We already know he's likely to split carries with Corey Clement, and now he's not going to get the chance to really put on a show in primetime during Big Ten season. Am I right? How does the schedule affect his Heisman chances?

Adam Rittenberg: That's a fair question, Jackie. Gordon undoubtedly would benefit from another prime-time game or two in November, especially if he's among the leaders for the Heisman. The good news is he has a terrific opportunity right away to make a national statement in the opener against LSU. The Tigers are consistently one of the nation's top defenses, and if Gordon has a big night in Houston, he'll be on the Heisman radar. It will be up to him to stay there with big performances against mostly middling competition until the end of the season, but the LSU game provides a platform for Gordon to make a splash. He could have another pre-Heisman prime-time opportunity if he leads Wisconsin to the Big Ten championship game in Indy, where he had a pretty decent night in 2012.




Danny O. from Davenport, Iowa, writes: The fact Iowa goes a second year in a row without any prime-time games is utterly disgusting. I know people outside of Hawkeye Nation will try and defend this decision by bringing up the the weak schedule, and normally they would be right. My question, however, is how can anyone justify giving Illinois ANY prime-time games, let alone two? If the B1G can make a case for this by giving in to Urban Meyer's whining for more prime-time games and giving them Illinois in one of those slots, certainly Iowa deserves one PT game in the past two years. Am I wrong?

Rittenberg: It's not about deserving, Danny. These are business decisions made by TV programming executives and athletic administrators from each school. Ohio State brings in larger regional and national TV audiences than Iowa, even when it's playing a team like Illinois. If Jim Tressel had wanted more night games, he would have gotten no complaints from the TV folks. So it's more of an Ohio State-Iowa issue than an Illinois-Iowa issue.

Iowa has been more conservative about night games, stating a preference about having one or two per year, not four or five. Athletic director Gary Barta said in 2012, "On our campus, one is fine. I don't know that we'll go to two. I'm confident it wouldn't go beyond that." If you combine that preference with an underwhelming schedule where the best games are at the end, when weather does enter the equation, you get no night games.




Brian from Magnolia, Texas, writes: Huge Husker fan here excited about all of the prime-time games this year. One question, when will we get to play Indiana? If memory serves correctly, we haven't played them yet and aren't scheduled to play them until at least 2015-16.

Rittenberg: The Huskers don't face Indiana until 2016 -- Oct. 15, to be exact -- when they visit Bloomington. Nebraska initially was set to face Indiana for the first time in Big Ten play on Nov. 14, 2015, but the league expansion and the schedule shuffle that ensued pushed back the meeting.




Brian from Iowa writes: For a long time now, teams like Iowa and Wisconsin have supported the B1G unconditionally, even when there has been a perceived league bias towards teams with richer histories. While I would have thought the question ridiculous a year ago, is it possible that Jim Delany's greed will eventually drive fans away? They already have trouble engaging students (future donors) and nothing endears current Big Ten boosters like a night game played at a mediocre stadium in New Jersey.

Rittenberg: Brian, I understand your anger about the prime-time selections, but you might have the wrong target. Jim Delany doesn't make the prime-time schedules. The league's television partners, along with the individual school administrators, are the power players here. Each school has its own preferences and constraints. A lot of things need to match up for a night game to work. If my team is left off the prime-time slate, I'm taking it up with my athletic director. Delany's recent expansion moves have turned off some Big Ten fans and he'll be judged appropriately. But his role in the prime-time schedule isn't as significant as many believe.




Jake from Seattle writes: What is your sense of the NU football team's response to the university's efforts to dissuade them from voting to form a union? Based on what I've read, my gut says the probability the team gets the votes needed to unionize is quite slim. I mean, having your coach and your university (both of which appear to do things the right way as far as D1 sports are concerned) openly against this must be pretty tough. Is your sense that the players are able to separate that voting to collectively bargain is not a referendum on Fitz or the university, but really on how the NCAA unfairly treats college athletes? I admit that I am biased. I think the players voting yes is in their best interest -- as well as the interests of other athletes that will invariably follow.

Rittenberg: Jake, some players might make that separation, but many feel that the debate has turned from national to Northwestern. Kain Colter's testimony at the Chicago NLRB hearing fundamentally shifted the focus from the NCAA to Northwestern. It led to a favorable ruling for Colter and CAPA, but it turned off some of his former teammates. Northwestern also thought the initial campaign was national, not local. Keep in mind that the Northwestern union ruling would apply only to private schools, which represent a small fraction of the FBS. My sense is they'll vote no, but I've been wrong on pretty much everything regarding this story.
The Final Four of our all-time Big Ten coaches tournament is all set.

On Monday, we announced that Penn State's Joe Paterno and Nebraska's Tom Osborne both advanced to the semifinals. Now it's time to find out the rest of our field.

Our seventh game pitted No. 2 seed Michigan's Bo Schembechler against No. 10 seed Barry Alvarez of Wisconsin. Alvarez made this closer than expected for a while, but Schembechler finished as the victor, earning 61 percent of your vote to 39 percent for the Badgers' Hall of Famer.

Game 8 was an all-Buckeyes affair between No. 1 overall seed Woody Hayes and No. 9 seed Jim Tressel. Hayes won that one going away, by a count of 82 percent to 18.

So our Final Four matchups will look like this:

No. 4 Joe Paterno vs. No. 1 Woody Hayes

No. 3 Tom Osborne vs. No. 2 Bo Schembechler

We'll open up the voting for these semifinals on Thursday. This should be a lot of fun.

Curiously, we didn't really get a lot of responses on the Alvarez-Schembechler match. Don't forget to send in your comments (especially you Bo backers). Here are a couple of your thoughts on the Hayes-Tressel showdown:
Matt from Cape Coral, Fla.: I grew up a huge Tress fan and the 2002 national title game is what finally sold me on football as a kid, but when it comes down to it, Woody is Ohio State football and you cannot argue with five national championships. I voted for Woody.

Robert B. from Logan, Ohio: Brian, in 1964, I was 14. We were in Canton for the North-South game. Woody was recruiting the son of my parents' best friends and we were at a local restaurant for lunch. My father had died less than a month before. Now I don't know if Stein, the boy's father, asked him to, or not, but Woody came over to the table and sat down and talked to me for about 15 minutes. There are hundreds, maybe thousands of stories just like mine that prove that Woody Hayes was more of a hero off the field than on. His record speaks for itself, but I am one speaking to his compassion. To me, he was a soft-spoken, kind man. I bleed scarlet and gray, as my father did, my children do, and my grandchildren do. Woody Hayes was a complete person and that's why I vote for him, even over Tressel.
Our Big Ten coaches tournament is down to eight legends, and only four of them will be marching on next week to the semifinals.

We come now to the last of our four second-round games. And it's an all-Buckeyes battle.

No. 1 Ohio State's Woody Hayes vs. No. 9 Ohio State's Jim Tressel


Tournament résumés:
  • SportsNation

    Which coach wins this second-round matchup?

    •  
      82%
    •  
      18%

    Discuss (Total votes: 6,137)

    Tressel: He coached exactly 10 years in the Big Ten before he left under a cloud of scandal, but few coaches have had better 10-year runs. Ohio State dominated the league under The Vest, winning or sharing seven Big Ten titles (though the last one was vacated) and the 2002 BCS championship. Tressel owns the second-highest winning percentage, both overall and in league play, for coaches who spent at least 10 years inside the conference.
  • Hayes: He's the No. 1 seed in the tournament for a reason. Hayes won 205 games, the most of any coach while a member of the Big Ten, and a record 152 league games. He also captured 13 Big Ten championships, tying him for the most all time, and five national titles (1954, 1957, 1961, 1968 and 1970). He was irascible, unyielding and one of a kind, and some of those qualities led to his downfall. But he is virtually synonymous with Ohio State and the Big Ten.

Which coach advances? Voting is open through Monday morning, and drop us a note as to why you voted the way you did. The best responses will run in our results posts.
We've arrived at the end of the first round of our all-time Big Ten coaches tournament.

Our final opening-round game pitted the most recent coach in our field against someone who started coaching in the Big Ten in 1913: No. 9 seed Ohio State's Jim Tressel vs. No. 8 seed Illinois' Bob Zuppke.

The possible future president of the University of Akron advanced with ease, as Tressel ousted Zuppke by a count of 68 percent to 32 percent in your voting.

And so our elite eight is set, and Tressel will face top overall seed Woody Hayes in an all-Buckeyes showdown. Look for the next two matchups later this week.

But first, let's hear some of your comments on our last first-round game:
Josh from Columbus, Ohio: Age skews my vote. I voted before even reading about the other coach. It would seem he would be more deserving. However, I appreciate what Tressel did for me as a fan. For that, Tressel gets my vote.
A.J. from Hickory, N.C.: I'm picking The Vest. You look at what he did during his time at OSU. He was pretty much forced out because of what happened. Think about what he could have done with more time.
Dukester from San Diego: Even though I'm an Ohio State fan, and I love Jim Tressel, I voted for Bob Zuppke. Four national championships, the long and successful tenure, Red Grange, etc. As great as Tressel was, I've gotta believe that Zuppke accomplished more.
Chad from Dacula, Ga: I vote for Tressel. Just based on his record against the other top school in the B1G, TTUN! (At least during that 10-year reign).
Chief Illiniwek from Illinois: Zuppke beats Tressel hands down. Anyone looking from a distance might not appreciate how much of an innovator Bob Zuppke was, not just with the huddle but with his formations and game planning. No two games were coached or planned the same, in an era when most teams had no more than a handful of plays they used all season. Coaches like Tressel (a great coach, no doubt) were able to accomplish what they did in large part because of coaches like Zuppke and Stagg. On top of that, Zuppke was a great motivator and educator, as Red Grange himself pointed out. Zuppke made Grange earn his way onto the team and pay his own way through school with no guarantee of playing time, but he also taught him a lot about football. Without Zuppke, there is no Grange, and without Grange, possibly no NCAA football or NFL as we know it.

B1G coaches' tournament: Game 4

March, 21, 2014
Mar 21
3:00
PM ET
On Wednesday, we introduced the all-time Big Ten coaches tournament, and now it's time to close out our first round.

Remember, this is a 12-team tournament in which the top four seeds all received byes. Those top four seeds are:

1. Woody Hayes, Ohio State
2. Bo Schembechler, Michigan
3. Tom Osborne, Nebraska
4. Joe Paterno, Penn State

SportsNation

Which coach wins this first round matchup

  •  
    32%
  •  
    68%

Discuss (Total votes: 5,823)

Our final first-round game pits the No. 8 seed vs. the No. 9 seed, with the winner advancing to face top overall seed Woody Hayes. Your votes will determine the winner, and you have until late Tuesday morning to weigh in on this one.

Let's wrap up Round 1 with:

No. 8 Illinois' Bob Zuppke vs. No. 9 Ohio State's Jim Tressel


Tournament résumés:

Tressel: He coached exactly 10 years in the Big Ten before he left under a cloud of scandal, but few coaches have had better 10-year runs. Ohio State dominated the league under The Vest, winning or sharing seven Big Ten titles (though the last one was vacated) and the 2002 BCS championship. Tressel owns the second-highest winning percentage, both overall and in league play, for coaches who spent at least 10 years inside the conference.

Zuppke: He had a much longer tenure than Tressel, coaching the Illini from 1913 to 1941. During that span, he won four national titles (1914, 1919, 1923, and 1927), and his teams included the legendary Red Grange. Zuppke is also credited for inventing the huddle, and he captured seven Big Ten titles.

Which coach advances? Vote now, and drop us a note as to why you voted the way you did. The best responses will run in our results posts.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Stopping Braxton Miller
ESPN's Adam Rittenberg spoke to several defensive players at Big Ten media days to get a sense of what makes Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller such a challenge to stop on the field, and what - if anything - they can do to slow him down.
VIDEO PLAYLIST video