Ohio State Buckeyes: Devin Funchess

Big Ten Friday mailblog

March, 28, 2014
Mar 28
4:30
PM ET
Happy hoopin' (and spring footballin').

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Marty from Orland Park, Ill., writes: My question is regarding the news that Northwestern players won their petition to unionize. I have read that this ruling would only have an impact on private colleges and universities if it is upheld. Does it also only relate to football players and not any other sport? Also, does it only apply to scholarship athletes, not walk-on athletes?

Adam Rittenberg: Marty, the specific ruling impacts only Northwestern players but could be used for groups from other private institutions. It applies only to Northwestern scholarship football players, as NLRB regional office director Peter Sung Ohr ruled that walk-ons constitute a separate category and wouldn't be part of a union. But if other Northwestern scholarship athletes sought to unionize, they could use this case in their favor.


M.A. Reed from Hamilton, Ohio, writes: Really? Miller and one returning starter ranked No. 3, behind a O-line that graduated---everyone? The Ohio"'lean" is more than obvious, but this is ridiculous. Michigan seven? With 9 starters back who are NOT 18 anymore. I could ID several other points, but it should be obvious. Still not buying in? Really?

Adam Rittenberg: Why should I buy in, M.A.? What has Michigan shown to make me believe it will have a top offense? It could happen. I like Devin Gardner more than most, Derrick Green is in his second year, and the offensive line should -- should, not will -- be improved. But Ohio State is simply a safer bet right now, even with a new-look offensive line. Urban Meyer is one of the best offensive coaches in the country and it's hard not to give Ohio State's staff an edge, especially with Ed Warinner coaching the line. Braxton Miller is a proven playmaker. Devin Smith and Jeff Heuerman provide some threats in the passing game. Michigan has big question marks at receiver aside from Devin Funchess. We see units improve all the time, and Michigan could make big strides this fall. But on paper, Ohio State is better.


Kenny from Cincy writes: Adam, I have been sensing good vibes out of Penn State with James Franklin and a weak schedule next year. It's nice to see it turning around, but can we be real about it? They aren't going to beat Michigan State and had a 60-spot put on that "tough" defense last year by the Buckeyes. They are also going to inevitably lose a game they shouldn't have, as they have done the past several years, and we are looking at a middle-of-the-pack, three- or four-loss season. And that's best-case scenario. Lots of false hope and unrealistic expectations. Rinse and repeat for next season. Am I wrong?

Adam Rittenberg: Kenny, I wouldn't write off the 2014 season before it starts, even though Penn State faces some obstacles. If the Lions can keep their starting 22 relatively healthy, they'll have a chance to do some damage. But it's important to be realistic about all the changes that the players have gone through, as well as the depth challenges that remain in key spots such as the offensive line. Penn State will be an underdog in several games, but it gets both MSU and OSU at home. You can do a lot with a good quarterback and a good coaching staff, and Penn State appears to have both.


Mike from Lincoln, Neb., writes: I have a question regarding two recent events in the B1G that tie together. Do you think the Illinois State Legislature foresaw the ruling in the Northwestern case and are trying to make a case to replace Northwestern? I remember reading that the former Northwestern president saying they might have to drop football if the players won the case. Could this be the way for the Illinois State legislature to replace the B1G's closest Chicago team with someone like Northern Illinois?

Adam Rittenberg: Mike, while I can see why you would make that connection, that's not the intent. The two state senators want to upgrade another state school to provide a second landing spot for strong Illinois high school students who don't get into the University of Illinois. They want a model like Michigan, Indiana and Iowa, which have two options with strong academics and big-time sports. What the senators and many others don't fully grasp is how difficult it would be to place another team in the Big Ten. The league has to want to expand, and most of its presidents and chancellors would have to approve a school like Northern Illinois. It's highly unlikely. Northwestern is a founding member of the league, and I don't anticipate the school's Big Ten status changing.


Bob from Houston writes: While I suspect my Boilermakers will struggle mightily again this year, I have to ask if you see a difference in player/team attitude and mental toughness this spring as opposed to last year.

Adam Rittenberg: I definitely do, Bob. Purdue had to start from scratch last season and spent so much time on simple things, such as how to line up. The teaching process, which I wrote about earlier today, is much more evolved and interactive this spring. There has been improvement in areas such as the offensive line, and more leaders are emerging. Will it translate to a winning season? The nonleague schedule is much easier, but the West Division looks solid and Purdue has crossovers against Michigan State (home) and Indiana (road). But progress is being made in West Lafayette.



SJL from State of Rutgers writes: You are right in labeling Tyler Kroft a "solid option at tight end". I expect big things from him this year. However, in your "Triple Threat Combinations" post you list Nova-James-Kroft as Rutgers' triple threat combination. I'm surprised you overlooked Leonte Carroo. I have to assume the only reason he isn't listed is the uncertainty at quarterback. I guess he won't be much of a threat if the QB play is as poor as it was last year.

Adam Rittenberg: Glad you brought up Carroo, who I could have and probably should have included on the list. If he stays healthy, he'll do some damage for Rutgers this fall. He averaged 17.1 yards per catch and had more than twice as many touchdown catches (nine) as any other Scarlet Knight. I'm interested to see how new offensive coordinator Ralph Friedgen uses Carroo this fall.
The best offenses can threaten defenses at the quarterback, running back and wide receiver positions. Brian Bennett on Tuesday examined the triple-threat combinations from the Big Ten's new West Division.

Now let's turn our attention to the East Division and rank the triple-threat combinations. The division is strong at quarterback but lacking elite wide receivers.

1. Indiana

QB Nate Sudfeld, RB Tevin Coleman, WR Shane Wynn

The Hoosiers featured the league's No. 2 offense in 2013 and top this list even though top receiver Cody Latimer bolted for the NFL draft. They have two options at quarterback, but Sudfeld, who had nearly 1,400 more passing yards than teammate Tre Roberson, gets the nod here. Coleman brings explosiveness to the backfield after rushing for 958 yards and 12 touchdowns in only nine games. Wynn finished near the top of the league in receiving touchdowns (11) and had 46 receptions for 633 yards.

2. Ohio State

QB Braxton Miller, RB Ezekiel Elliott, WR Devin Smith

You would think a team with the back-to-back Big Ten offensive player of the year at quarterback would be rated higher, but the Buckeyes lose a huge piece at running back in Carlos Hyde, as well as top receiver Corey Brown. Elliott, who had 262 rushing yards last season, is competing for the starting position this spring. Smith has been Miller's big-play target throughout his career and had eight touchdown catches and averaged 15 yards per reception last fall. Tight end Jeff Heuerman provides another weapon in the pass game.

3. Michigan State

QB Connor Cook, RB Jeremy Langford, WR Tony Lippett

The skinny: A year ago, Michigan State's offense looked like a mess. Cook began the season as the backup but emerged to lead the Spartans to nine Big Ten wins, all by double digits, and a Rose Bowl championship. Langford answered Michigan State's running back questions with 1,422 yards and 18 touchdowns. There's no true No. 1 receiver on the roster, and while Macgarrett Kings (513 receiving yards in 2013) could claim the role, Lippett gets the nod after leading the team in receptions (44) and finishing second in receiving yards (613) last year.
4. Penn State

QB Christian Hackenberg, RB Zach Zwinak, TE Jesse James

The Lions have the Big Ten's top pocket passer in Hackenberg, the league's freshman of the year in 2013. But Hackenberg loses his favorite target in Allen Robinson, and wide receiver is a major question entering the fall. The tight end position looks much stronger with James, Kyle Carter and Adam Breneman. Penn State also has options at running back, but Zwinak has led the team in rushing in each of the past two years, finishing with 989 yards and 12 touchdowns last fall.

5. Maryland

QB C.J. Brown, RB Brandon Ross, WR Stefon Diggs

Don't be surprised if Maryland finishes higher on the postseason triple-threats list as long as their top players stay healthy, which is hardly a guarantee after the past two seasons. Brown is a veteran dual-threat player who had 2,242 passing yards and 13 touchdowns last year. Ross leads a potentially deep group of running backs after leading the team with 776 rushing yards. Although Levern Jacobs led Maryland in receiving last year and returns, Diggs is the team's top threat after averaging 17.3 yards per catch before a season-ending injury in October.

6. Michigan

QB Devin Gardner, RB Derrick Green, TE/WR Devin Funchess

Gardner is capable of putting up some big numbers, as he showed last year, but he loses top target Jeremy Gallon. The run game is a major question mark for new coordinator Doug Nussmeier, although hopes are high for Green, a heralded recruit who had 270 rushing yards as a freshman. At 6-5 and 230 pounds, Funchess is a tight end who plays like a wide receiver. He finished second on the team in receptions (49), receiving yards (748) and touchdowns (6).

7. Rutgers

QB Gary Nova, RB Paul James, TE Tyler Kroft

New coordinator Ralph Friedgen tries to spark an offense that finished 77th nationally in scoring and 95th in yards last season. Nova is competing this spring to retain the starting job, which he has held since the middle of the 2011 season. James averaged 5.6 yards per carry last season and can be very effective when healthy. Rutgers is scrambling at bit at the wide receiver position but returns a solid option at tight end in Kroft, who led the team in both receptions (43) and receiving yards (573) last fall.

We're taking snapshots of each position group with each Big Ten team entering the spring. The wide receivers and tight ends are up next.

Illinois: The Illini are looking for more from this group after losing top target Steve Hull, who exploded late in the season to finish just shy of 1,000 receiving yards. While running back Josh Ferguson (50 catches in 2013) will continue to contribute, Illinois could use a boost from Martize Barr, who arrived with high expectations but only had 26 receptions last fall. Another junior-college transfer, Geronimo Allison, could make an impact beginning this spring, but there's some mystery at wideout. Illinois looks more solid at tight end with seniors Jon Davis and Matt LaCosse.

Indiana: Despite the somewhat surprising early departure of All-Big Ten selection Cody Latimer, Indiana should be fine here. Shane Wynn is the veteran of the group after recording 633 receiving yards on 46 catches last season. Kofi Hughes and Duwyce Wilson also depart, so Indiana will be leaning more on Nick Stoner and Isaiah Roundtree. The Hoosiers have high hopes for early enrollee Dominique Booth, a decorated recruit who could fill Latimer's spot on the outside. Productive tight end Ted Bolser departs and several players will compete, including early enrollee Jordan Fuchs.

Iowa: Almost all the wide receivers are back from a group in which none eclipsed more than 400 receiving yards in 2013. Balance is nice, but separation could be nicer for the Hawkeyes this spring. Kevonte Martin-Manley is the most experienced wideout and has 122 career receptions. Tevaun Smith also returns, and Iowa fans are excited about big-play threat Damond Powell, who averaged 24.2 yards on only 12 receptions last season. Iowa loses its top red-zone target in tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz and will need Jake Duzey to deliver more Ohio State-like performances.

Maryland: When the Terrapins get healthy, they might have the Big Ten's best wide receiving corps. Stefon Diggs and Deon Long, both of whom sustained broken legs against Wake Forest last season, have the ability to stretch the field as both averaged more than 15 yards per reception before the injuries struck. Leading receiver Levern Jacobs also returns, alongside junior Nigel King and sophomore Amba Etta-Tawo, who averaged more than 16 yards per catch in 2013. Marcus Leak, who started seven games in 2012, rejoins the team after a year away. The Terps are unproven at tight end after losing Dave Stinebaugh.

Michigan: There's a reason why some Michigan fans want Devin Gardner to return to wide receiver for his final season. The Wolverines are thin on the perimeter after losing Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo. Redshirt sophomores Jehu Chesson and Amara Darboh are both candidates to start, and Dennis Norfleet could be the answer in the slot. But there's plenty of opportunity for younger players like Drake Harris, an early enrollee. Michigan's best pass-catching option, Devin Funchess, is listed as a tight end but plays more like a receiver. The Wolverines will be without their second-string tight end, Jake Butt, who suffered an ACL tear in winter conditioning.

Michigan State: Remember all the justified angst about this group a year ago? It has pretty much gone away as the Spartans wideouts rebounded nicely in 2013. Bennie Fowler departs, but MSU brings back its top two receivers in Tony Lippett and Macgarrett Kings, who showed explosiveness down the stretch last fall. Aaron Burbridge had a bit of a sophomore slump but provides another option alongside veteran Keith Mumphery, who averaged 16.6 yards per catch in 2013. Josiah Price leads the tight end group after a solid freshman season.

Minnesota: Here's a group to watch during spring practice, particularly the wide receivers. Minnesota has proven it can run the ball and defend under Jerry Kill, but the passing game was putrid in 2013, ranking last in the Big Ten and 115th nationally. Youth is partly to blame, and while the Gophers still lack experience, they can expect more from promising players like Drew Wolitarsky and Donovahn Jones. Senior Isaac Fruechte provides a veteran presence. Minnesota looks solid at tight end with sophomore Maxx Williams, the team's receiving yards leader (417) in 2013.

Nebraska: The Huskers lose a significant piece in Quincy Enunwa, who led the team in receiving yards (753) and had three times as many receiving touchdowns (12) as anyone else in 2013. Kenny Bell is set to recapture the No. 1 receiver role, which he had in 2012, and comes off of a 52-catch season as a junior. Nebraska must build around Bell this spring with players like the mustachioed Jordan Westerkamp, who had 20 catches as a freshman, including a rather memorable one to beat Northwestern. Will Jamal Turner turn the corner this offseason? Juniors Sam Burtch and Taariq Allen also return. Cethan Carter started six games at tight end last fall and should take over the top spot there as Jake Long departs.

Northwestern: The passing game fell short of expectations in 2013, but there's reason for optimism as Northwestern returns its top three pass-catchers in Tony Jones, Christian Jones and Dan Vitale. The two Joneses (no relation), who combined for 109 catches in 2013, lead the receiving corps along with junior Cameron Dickerson. Speedy Rutgers transfer Miles Shuler provides a playmaking spark, possibly at slot receiver. Vitale, who had a somewhat disappointing sophomore season, has All-Big Ten potential at the superback (tight end) spot. Although Northwestern rarely plays true freshmen, superback Garrett Dickerson, Cameron's brother, could see the field right away.

Ohio State: A group that drew heavy criticism from coach Urban Meyer two springs ago is stockpiling talent. Devin Smith is the familiar name, a big-play senior who has started each of the past two seasons and boasts 18 career touchdowns. Ohio State must replace top wideout Corey Brown and will look for more from Evan Spencer. Michael Thomas has stood out in practices but must translate his performance to games. This could be a breakout year for H-back Dontre Wilson, who averaged nine yards per touch as a freshman. Buckeyes fans are eager to see redshirt freshmen Jalin Marshall and James Clark, and incoming players like Johnnie Dixon could make a splash right away. Ohio State returns an elite tight end in Jeff Heuerman.

Penn State: The Lions have very different depth situations at receiver and tight end. They're looking for contributors on the perimeter after losing Allen Robinson, the Big Ten's top wide receiver the past two seasons, who accounted for 46 percent of the team's receiving production in 2013. Brandon Felder also departs, leaving Geno Lewis as the likeliest candidate to move into a featured role. Richy Anderson also returns, but there will be plenty of competition/opportunity at receiver, a position new coach James Franklin targeted in recruiting with players like Chris Godwin and Saeed Blacknall. Things are much more stable at tight end as the Lions return three talented players in Jesse James, Kyle Carter and Adam Breneman.

Purdue: If you're looking for hope at Purdue, these spots aren't bad places to start. There are several promising young players like receiver DeAngelo Yancey, who recorded a team-leading 546 receiving yards as a freshman. Cameron Posey also had a decent freshman year (26 catches, 297 yards), and Danny Anthrop averaged 18.4 yards as a sophomore. A full offseason with quarterbacks Danny Etling and Austin Appleby should help the group. Tight end also should be a strength as Justin Sinz, who led Purdue with 41 catches last season, is back along with Gabe Holmes, who returns after missing most of 2013 with a wrist injury.

Rutgers: The good news is tight end Tyler Kroft returns after leading Rutgers in both receptions (43) and receiving yards (573) last season. Kroft will immediately contend for All-Big Ten honors. Things are murkier at wide receiver, where top contributors Brandon Coleman and Quron Pratt both depart. Leonte Carroo took a nice step as a sophomore, averaging 17.1 yards per catch and enters the spring as the frontrunner to become the team's No. 1 wideout. Ruhann Peele is another promising young receiver for the Scarlet Knights, who boast size with Carlton Agudosi (6-foot-6) and Andre Patton (6-4).

Wisconsin: The quarterback competition will gain more attention this spring, but Wisconsin's receiver/tight end situation could be more critical. The Badgers lose Jared Abbrederis, their only major threat at receiver the past two seasons, as well as top tight end Jacob Pedersen. Players like Jordan Fredrick and Kenzel Doe must translate their experience into greater production, and Wisconsin will look for more from young receivers like Alex Erickson and Robert Wheelwright. Help is on the way as Wisconsin signed five receivers in the 2014 class, but wideout definitely is a position of concern right now. Sam Arneson is the logical candidate to step in for Pedersen, but there should be competition as the Badgers lose a lot at the position.

Big Ten Thursday chat wrap

January, 23, 2014
Jan 23
4:00
PM ET
As we suffer through winter and the offseason together, we also bond over Big Ten football. Thanks to those who joined me earlier today for the weekly Big Ten chat. We discussed the East-West balance in the Big Ten, recruits flipping, new coaching hires and more.

[+] EnlargeJames Franklin
Matthew O'Haren/USA TODAY SportsAs James Franklin can attest to, flipping recruits is part of the business.
Did you miss out? Not to worry. Here's a full chat transcript, along with some highlights:

Bernard from Columbus: Larry Johnson an upgrade over [Mike] Vrabel in both recruiting and coaching?

Adam Rittenberg: Hmmm, good question. In coaching, I'd say yes, mainly because Johnson has way more experience than Vrabel and a track record of producing elite defensive linemen. As a recruiter, I'd also give Johnson a slight edge because of his long-term success, but Vrabel had quickly developed himself into an outstanding recruiter.

Rob from Morristown, N.J.: What is your honest take on [James] Franklin flipping recruits from Vandy to PSU? I hear a lot of other teams' fans talking about how we were up in arms when other programs were poaching our players once the sanctions were handed down ... as much as many of us were upset that recruits like Noah Spence and Armani Reeves flipped to Ohio State ... there is no comparison, we were upset that other schools were trying to flip our CURRENTLY enrolled players ... just wanted to get that out there...

Adam Rittenberg: Rob, we both know that no fan base likes it when coaches flip their recruits, but fans also should know by now that it happens all the time and will continue to happen unless there's an early signing period. James Franklin was honest about it when asked: Players do pick coaches, not schools, and will follow coaches if they leave. Is it unfortunate? To a degree. But it's the nature of the business, and Penn State has experienced both sides of it in recent years. I agree that the attempts to flip current players -- looking at you, Tim Beckman -- annoyed PSU fans more than losing recruits to Urban [Meyer].

TB from Champaign, Ill.: What are the odds of me keeping my job with the Illini after 2014 and finishing off my "Fighting Force 2015" recruiting class?

Adam Rittenberg: It could happen, TB, but you need to make a bowl game this season. Few coaches with three bowl-less seasons are going to survive, especially those who have never won over the fan base/boosters. So how do you get to six wins? It's certainly possible with a schedule that includes three likely non-league wins (Youngstown State, Western Kentucky and Texas State), and a crossover schedule that doesn't include Michigan State or Michigan. The road schedule is once again brutal (Washington, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Ohio State, Northwestern), so your team must play well on its home field.

Rick from Georgia: Adam, with a new OC at Michigan, do you think they may go in the direction of using a two-QB system similar to Northwestern? It would be nice to see [Devin] Gardner line up at wide receiver while also getting snaps at QB.

Adam Rittenberg: Rick, while you can't rule this out because Michigan loses both [Jeremy] Gallon and [Drew] Dileo, the team would like to keep Gardner at quarterback, if at all possible. The Wolverines have some talent at tight end with [Devin] Funchess (essentially a WR) and Jake Butt, but they must develop some other options at receiver this spring. Shane Morris' progress at QB also will be key. Can he really push Gardner, or will a healthy Gardner separate himself in spring ball? Should be really interesting.

Steve from NJ: Adam, really miss chatting with everyone since the turn to Facebook, but oh well. As for the B1G East this year, I have no trouble giving OSU credit for what they did, although you have to admit, many of [its] games could have gone either way. MSU looks very strong. UM hasn't shown much of late. And PSU, even with the sanctions, is still hanging on. My point is, the winner of the East could be any of those four based on how the ball bounces. In the West, I really only see Wisc and Neb, with NW and Iowa having an outside shot.

Adam Rittenberg: Steve, I guess I wonder why you think Wisconsin and Nebraska are far and away the favorites in the West? Wisconsin loses an enormous senior class and has QB questions. Nebraska lost to Iowa and Minnesota and was a Hail Mary tip from losing to Northwestern. Will the Huskers suddenly eliminate their sloppiness and become dominant in 2014? Maybe, maybe not. I think the West is pretty even with the top 4-5 teams, while the East likely will be a 2- or 3-team race, as I don't think Penn State has enough to keep up.

Thanks again for your questions and participation. Let's do it again soon.
The Big Ten released its all-conference teams as selected by coaches and the media earlier this month. We didn't have a vote for the media teams, and we don't pretend to know as much about football as the league's coaches.

But we can also say with confidence that we watched more Big Ten football here at the blog than anyone else. So here are our picks for the 2013 ESPN.com All-Big Ten team:

Offense

[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
Andy Lyons/Getty ImagesBraxton Miller is one of six Buckeyes on ESPN.com's All-Big Ten team.
QB: Braxton Miller, Ohio State
RB: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State
RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska
WR: Allen Robinson, Penn State
WR: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan
OL: Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
OL: Brandon Scherff, Iowa
OL: Taylor Lewan, Michigan
OL: Corey Linsley, Ohio State
OL: Ryan Groy, Wisconsin

Defense

DE: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State
DT: Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
DE: Randy Gregory, Nebraska
LB: Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
LB: Chris Borland, Wisconsin
LB: Max Bullough, Michigan State
LB: James Morris, Iowa
DB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
DB: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State
DB: Bradley Roby, Ohio State
DB: Brock Vereen, Minnesota

Specialists

K: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern
P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State
KR: Kenny Bell, Nebraska
PR: Kevonte Martin-Manley, Iowa

OK, so we cheated just a bit on positions, going with three tackles on our offensive line and a 3-4 defense. But considering the coaches had six defensive backs and two punters on their first team, we don't feel too bad about it. ... We wanted to include Scherff, Lewan and Mewhort on the first team, because we thought they were the three best linemen in the league. If we had to field an actual team with these guys, we're sure we could figure it out. It was a tough call between Groy and Penn State's John Urschel, whom we love for his on- and off-the-field accomplishments. We just felt Wisconsin had the better overall season as an offensive line, so we went with Groy. ... We went with the 3-4 because linebacker was such a deep position in this league -- so deep that we had to leave off some deserving players, like Michigan State's Denicos Allen -- while defensive line wasn't nearly as strong. ... The defensive backfield was a tough call (no wonder the coaches had an, ahem, pick six there). Dennard was a lock, and we felt that Drummond was the league's best safety in a year when that position was a bit weak conference-wide. We like what Vereen did in providing versatility and leadership for the Gophers, and Roby overcame a slow start to do his usual fine work. We had to leave off very good cornerbacks like Michigan's Blake Countess, Nebraska's Stanley Jean-Baptiste and Iowa's B.J. Lowery -- but that's what a second team is for. Stay tuned. ... Ohio State leads the way with six selections, followed by Michigan State with five. It's almost as if those were the two best teams in the league or something.
You've had a chance to check out the 2013 All-Big Ten teams and individual award winners. The four major award winners -- Offensive Player of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Coach of the Year and Freshman of the Year -- will be unveiled Tuesday.

Let's dive into today's selections ...

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

The overall list isn't bad, although some of the selections certainly are debatable.
  • Ohio State's Carlos Hyde takes home the Ameche-Dayne Running Back of the Year award after bulldozing the competition in Big Ten play (1,249 rush yards, 14 touchdowns). Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah has a strong case for the honor after his consistent success, eclipsing 100 rush yards in 10 of 12 games. But Hyde certainly finished on a stronger note with 226 rush yards against Michigan, the most ever for an Ohio State player in The Game. He was unstoppable in the most important games.
  • Michigan tackle Taylor Lewan claims Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year honors for the second consecutive season. Lewan had a very good season, and a great season, if you believe Wolverines coach Brady Hoke. But he anchored a line that struggled for much of Big Ten play. Ohio State tackle Jack Mewhort probably has a case here, as he led the league's best front five.
  • Wisconsin's Chris Borland gets the nod for Butkus-Fitzgerald Linebacker of the Year, ahead of fellow standouts like Ohio State's Ryan Shazier, Michigan State's Max Bullough and Iowa's James Morris. Borland did it all in his four seasons as a Badger, constantly swarming to the ball and making plays. But he missed some time with a hamstring injury this season, and Shazier's overall numbers are more impressive. It will be interesting to see who wins Defensive Player of the Year honors. There are so many great linebackers in this league.
  • Purdue's Cody Webster won Eddleman-Fields Punter of the Year ahead of Michigan State's Mike Sadler, Ohio State's Cameron Johnston and others. Webster is the Big Ten's only finalist for the Ray Guy Award, but Sadler should have been on there as well. It's a really close call between Webster and Sadler, who successfully executed two fakes and played for a much better team.
  • Four players are repeat winners from 2012: Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller, Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson, Lewan and Northwestern kicker Jeff Budzien.
ALL-BIG TEN TEAMS

Overall, these looked a little better than the 2012 version, which contained several glaring problems in our view. The coaches' team continues to surprise us (not in a good way) with six defensive backs and two punters because of ties in the voting, and no Mewhort on the first team is hard to believe. But this was a slight step up.

(By the way, the Big Ten still doesn't have either of us vote for the media team, so direct your blame elsewhere).
  • Lewan, Mewhort and Iowa's Brandon Scherff all are terrific tackles, but we would have gone with Mewhort and Lewan on the first team, which the coaches did not.
  • Although Michigan's Devin Funchess claimed Kwalick-Clark Tight End of the Year honors, the coaches went with Iowa's C.J. Fiedorowicz as their first-team tight end. We can debate whether Funchess actually is a tight end or not, but his receiving numbers (47 catches, 727 yards, six touchdowns) are way better than Fiedorowicz's (26 catches, 253 yards, six TDs).
  • The coaches had six first-team defensive backs but didn't find room for Michigan's Blake Countess, who tied for the league lead in interceptions, or Nebraska's Stanley Jean-Baptiste, who had four picks and 11 pass breakups. Maybe only one Michigan State safety (our pick would be Kurtis Drummond) should be there.
  • Michigan wide receiver Jeremy Gallon had some huge performances, but he probably belongs on the second team behind Penn State's Robinson and Wisconsin's Jared Abbrederis, who were more consistent as the season went along. The coaches went with Ohio State's Corey Brown as their other second-team wideout, while the media went with Indiana's Cody Latimer. We like Latimer there.
  • One player the coaches and media differed on is Minnesota safety Brock Vereen, a first-team selection by the coaches but just an honorable mention selection by the media. He probably belongs right in between, on the second team, after leading a stout Gophers defense.
  • Another big difference between the coaches and media involved Iowa's B.J. Lowery. The media voted him as a first-team defensive back, while the coaches did not have Lowery among their eight choices on the first and second teams. Lowery is a nice player, but we're scratching our heads a bit as to why he was a first-team pick by the media.
  • Both Wisconsin back, Melvin Gordon and James White, made the second team. It says a lot about the depth at running back this year that Michigan State's Jeremy Langford, who ran for 1,200 yards and 16 touchdowns, couldn't crack the first or second teams.
  • We sure wish the league had a process for breaking ties on the coaches' team. Six defensive backs and two punters? That's just strange, though we'd like to see that two-punter formation in real life.
  • Connor Cook or Nathan Scheelhaase as the second-team quarterback? The coaches and media split on that. Scheelhaase has the better numbers, but Cook won all eight Big Ten starts. No wonder that latter fact probably impressed the coaches more.
  • The major awards -- offensive and defensive players of the year, freshman of the year and coach of the year -- will be announced on Tuesday.
The Big Ten has released its official 2013 all-conference teams as selected by the coaches and media, along with some of the major individual award winners. We'll have reaction to the choices in a bit, but first digest these lists:

Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year: Braxton Miller, Ohio State

Richter-Howard Receiver of the Year: Allen Robinson, Penn State

Ameche-Dayne Running Back of the Year: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State

Kwalick-Clark Tight End of the Year: Devin Funchess, Michigan

Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year: Taylor Lewan, Michigan

Smith-Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State

Butkus-Fitzgerald Linebacker of the Year: Chris Borland, Wisconsin

Tatum-Woodson Defensive Back of the Year: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State

Bakken-Andersen Kicker of the Year: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

Eddleman-Fields Punter of the Year: Cody Webster, Purdue

First team (coaches)

QB: Braxton Miller, Ohio State
RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska
RB: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State
WR: Allen Robinson, Penn State
WR: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
Andrew Weber/USA TODAY SportsOhio State's Braxton Miller has been named the Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year in the Big Ten.
C: Corey Linsley, Ohio State
G: John Urschel, Penn State
G: Ryan Groy, Wisconsin
T: Brandon Scherff, Iowa
T: Taylor Lewan, Michigan
TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa
K: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

DL: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State
DL: Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
DL: Randy Gregory, Nebraska
DL: DaQuan Jones, Penn State
LB: Max Bullough, Michigan State
LB: Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
LB: Chris Borland, Wisconsin
DB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
DB: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State
DB: Isaiah Lewis, Michigan State
DB: Brock Vereen, Minnesota
DB: Ciante Evans, Nebraska
DB: Bradley Roby, Ohio State
P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State
P: Cody Webster, Purdue

First team (Media)

QB: Braxton Miller, Ohio State
RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska
RB: Carlos Hyde, Ohio State
WR: Allen Robinson, Penn State
WR: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
C: Corey Linsley, Ohio State
G: Andrew Norwell, Ohio State
G: John Urschel, Penn State
T: Taylor Lewan, Michigan
T: Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan
K: Jeff Budzien, Northwestern

DL: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State
DL: Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
DL: Randy Gregory, Nebraska
DL: Noah Spence, Ohio State
LB: Max Bullough, Michigan State
LB: Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
LB: Chris Borland, Wisconsin
DB: B.J. Lowery, Iowa
DB: Blake Countess, Michigan
DB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
DB: Bradley Roby, Ohio State
P: Cody Webster, Purdue

Second team (Coaches)

[+] EnlargeShilique Calhoun
Mike Carter/USA TODAY SportsMichigan State's Shilique Calhoun has been named the Smith-Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year in the Big Ten.
QB: Connor Cook, Michigan State
RB: Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin
RB: James White, Wisconsin
WR: Jeremy Gallon, Michigan
WR: Corey Brown, Ohio State
C: Cole Pensick, Nebraska
G: Blake Treadwell, Michigan State
G: Andrew Norwell, Ohio State
T: Brett Van Sloten, Iowa
T: Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan
K: Mitch Ewald, Indiana

DL: Carl Davis, Iowa
DL: Frank Clark, Michigan
DL: Michael Bennett, Ohio State
DL: Noah Spence, Ohio State
LB: Anthony Hitchens, Iowa
LB: James Morris, Iowa
LB: Denicos Allen, Michigan State
DB: Blake Countess, Michigan
DB: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska

Second team (Media)

QB: Nathan Scheelhaase, Illinois
RB: Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin
RB: James White, Wisconsin
WR: Cody Latimer, Indiana
WR: Jeremy Gallon, Michigan
C: Jack Allen, Michigan State
G: Blake Treadwell, Michigan State
G: Ryan Groy, Wisconsin
T: Brandon Scherff, Iowa
T: Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin
TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa
K: Mike Meyer, Iowa

DL: Theiren Cockran, Minnesota
DL: Tyler Scott, Northwestern
DL: Michael Bennett, Ohio State
DL: DaQuan Jones, Penn State
LB: Jonathan Brown, Illinois
LB: James Morris, Iowa
LB: Denicos Allen, Michigan State
LB: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State
DB: Ciante Evans, Nebraska
DB: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska
DB: Ricardo Allen, Purdue
P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State

Honorable mention (coaches): ILLINOIS: Jonathan Brown, Steve Hull, Nathan Scheelhaase; INDIANA: Ted Bolser, Tevin Coleman, Cody Latimer, Jason Spriggs; IOWA: Austin Blythe, Conor Boffeli, Christian Kirksey, B.J. Lowery, Tanner Miller, Louis Trinca-Pasat; MICHIGAN: Jibreel Black, Michael Schofield; MICHIGAN STATE: Jack Allen, Fou Fonoti, Dan France, Jeremy Langford, Marcus Rush, Trae Waynes; MINNESOTA: Caleb Bak, Aaron Hill, Peter Mortell, Eric Murray; NEBRASKA: Jason Ankrah, Kenny Bell, Corey Cooper, Andrew Rodriguez, Jeremiah Sirles; NORTHWESTERN: Ibraheim Campbell, Tyler Scott, Brandon Vitabile; OHIO STATE: C.J. Barnett, Drew Basil, Joey Bosa, Doran Grant, Marcus Hall, Jeff Heuerman, Cameron Johnston, Devin Smith; PENN STATE: Adrian Amos, Glenn Carson, Christian Hackenberg, Ty Howle, Jordan Lucas, C.J. Olaniyan, Donovan Smith; PURDUE: Ricardo Allen; WISCONSIN: Beau Allen, Rob Havenstein,Tyler Marz, Pat Muldoon, Jacob Pedersen, Dezmen Southward.

Honorable mention (media): ILLINOIS: Houston Bates, Steve Hull; INDIANA: Tim Bennett, Ted Bolser, Tevin Coleman, Mitch Ewald, Collin Rahrig, Jason Spriggs; IOWA: Austin Blythe, Conor Boffeli, Carl Davis, Anthony Hitchens, Christian Kirksey, Casey Kreiter, John Lowdermilk, Tanner Miller, Louis Trinca-Pasat, Brett Van Sloten; MICHIGAN: Jibreel Black, Frank Clark, Devin Gardner, Brendan Gibbons; Raymon Taylor; MICHIGAN STATE: Connor Cook, Fou Fonoti, Dan France, Michael Geiger, Jeremy Langford, Isaiah Lewis, Marcus Rush; Trae Waynes; MINNESOTA: Caleb Bak, Josh Campion, Zac Epping, Peter Mortell, Eric Murray, Brock Vereen; NEBRASKA: Jason Ankrah, Kenny Bell, Cole Pensick, Andrew Rodriguez, Jeremiah Sirles, Pat Smith; NORTHWESTERN: Chi Chi Ariguzo, Ibraheim Campbell, Damien Proby, Brandon Vitabile; OHIO STATE: C.J. Barnett, Drew Basil, Joey Bosa, Corey Brown, Doran Grant, Marcus Hall, Jeff Heuerman, Cameron Johnston; PENN STATE: Glenn Carson, Sam Ficken, Christian Hackenberg, Ty Howle, Jesse James, Jordan Lucas, C.J. Olaniyan, Donovan Smith; WISCONSIN: Beau Allen, Michael Caputo, Tyler Marz, Pat Muldoon, Jacob Pedersen, Sojourn Shelton, Dezmen Southward, Joel Stave.

Big Ten predictions: Week 12

November, 14, 2013
11/14/13
9:00
AM ET
It's picks time again as we attempt to forecast the five teams that will walk off the field Saturday with smiles on their faces.

Brian Bennett is still smiling these days as he clings to a one-game lead in the season standings. Adam Rittenberg has three weeks left to close the gap, or he'll be paying for Bennett's dinner in Indianapolis before the Big Ten championship game.

Iowa and Minnesota are off in Week 12, but the other 10 league squads are in action.

Let's get started …

PURDUE at PENN STATE

Bennett: Penn State is a much better team at home, and Purdue is … well, let's be kind. The Nittany Lions' struggling offense gets well versus the Boilermakers, as both Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak run for a pair of touchdowns. … Penn State 38, Purdue 14.


Rittenberg: The Lions get the win at home, but it's close for a half as Purdue's offense shows some life behind quarterback Danny Etling. But another freshman signal-caller, Christian Hackenberg, steals the show with three touchdown passes, two to Allen Robinson, as he regains his swagger for Penn State. … Penn State 31, Purdue 17

INDIANA at WISCONSIN

Rittenberg: Indiana has had absolutely no answers for Wisconsin's offense in recent years, and I can't see the script changing Saturday. Melvin Gordon breaks out of his mini-slump with two 60-yard touchdown runs, James White adds two more touchdowns and Wisconsin puts another big number on IU. The Hoosiers strike for some early points before Wisconsin's defense buckles down. … Wisconsin 45, Indiana 28

Bennett: 204-41. That's the combined score of the past three meetings between these teams. Indiana's offense is better and should score a bit, but Wisconsin could run for 400 yards if it wanted to this week. It will settle for 350. … Wisconsin 48, Indiana 24.


OHIO STATE at ILLINOIS

Bennett: It's 19 Big Ten losses in a row versus 21 overall wins in a row. Yeah, these teams could hardly be going in more different directions. The Buckeyes are rolling right now, and while I don't agree with Evan Spencer that they would wipe the floor with Alabama or Florida State, they will be taking a giant Swiffer to the Illini as Carlos Hyde rumbles for 185 rushing yards and three scores. … Ohio State 58, Illinois 17.


Rittenberg: Ohio State players are openly talking about the need to win with style points, and that's a scary situation for the Illini, who can't stop anyone right now. Braxton Miller attempted four passes in his previous game at Illinois. He fires four touchdowns to three different receivers, and Hyde adds 150 yards and two scores as the Buckeyes roll easily. Kenny G gets into the act late too with a pair. … Ohio State 52, Illinois 13

MICHIGAN at NORTHWESTERN

Rittenberg: I've been burned for picking Northwestern in its past two games, so while Michigan looks shakier right now, I'm going with the Wolverines. Northwestern is still really banged up, and Michigan's defense will contain Kain Colter and an offense operating with a limited playbook. Michigan's offense struggles early but hits on two big pass plays for touchdowns in the fourth quarter, including the game-winner to Devin Funchess. … Michigan 24, Northwestern 20

Bennett: Both teams have some major issues, especially on the offensive side of the ball. I just really don't like the mojo around Michigan right now. Northwestern has been close to breaking through the past couple of games and had a bye week to get healed up. The Wildcats should be able to stuff the Wolverines' nonexistent run game, and Colter leads his team on a last-minute drive for the game-winning field goal. … Northwestern 20, Michigan 17


MICHIGAN STATE at NEBRASKA

Bennett: I admire what Nebraska has done the past couple of weeks with an injury-plagued offense. At the same time, I shudder to think what Michigan State's defense can do to that offense, especially given some of the shuffling on the offensive line and the lack of a big-time passing attack. The Huskers' defensive improvement will be enough to keep this a close, low-scoring affair. But Nebraska will have too much trouble getting points and yards, and the Spartans hang on after building an early 10-point lead. … Michigan State 17, Nebraska 13.


Rittenberg: The Huskers are 5-0 with young Tommy Armstrong Jr. as their starting quarterback, but they haven't seen a defense as fearsome as Michigan State's. The Spartans are healthier and better on both sides of the ball, and they're motivated to beat Nebraska after blowing a fourth-quarter lead last year. Running back Jeremy Langford rushes for two touchdowns and cornerback Darqueze Dennard seals the win with an interception as Michigan State overcomes another gritty effort from Ameer Abdullah and the Huskers. … Michigan State 20, Nebraska 13

You've seen our predictions. Now it's time to hear from one of you. As a reminder, throughout the season, we'll choose one fan/loyal blog reader each week to try his or her hand at outsmarting us. There's nothing but pride and some extremely limited fame at stake. If you're interested in participating, contact us here and here. Include your full name (real names, please), hometown and a brief description of why you should be that week's guest picker. Please also include "GUEST PICKS" in all caps somewhere in your email so we can find it easily.

This week's guest checks in from the Land of the Rising Sun. John Wells from Yokohama, Japan (formerly of Kenosha, Wis.), the floor is yours …
Konnichi wa (Hello) from Japan, where I have lived for 41 years after graduating from the Univ. of Wisconsin in 1973. I would love to be your "guest picker" for Week 12. I am an AVID Badger fan and Big Ten follower every week. My students know about Wisconsin and the Big Ten. I do not get much sleep on Saturday nights as I wake at odd hours just to catch the Badgers or any good Big Ten battle. I have flown across that wide Pacific three times to see the Badgers play in the Rose Bowl. I am a happy senior now (66) and what fun it would be if you both chose me. Can't imagine what life would be without Big Ten football! Thanks for considering me.

Domo arigato, John. Here are John's picks:

Penn State 31, Purdue 10
Wisconsin 45, Indiana 10
Ohio State 56, Illinois 10
Michigan 24, Northwestern 17
Michigan State 24, Nebraska 14

SEASON RECORDS

Brian Bennett: 64-13
Adam Rittenberg: 63-14
Guest pickers: 60-19

Big Ten awards race tracker: Week 10

October, 29, 2013
10/29/13
1:00
PM ET
It's November. It's the month when championships are decided -- and also when individual honors are earned. Let's take a look at where some of the major Big Ten award races stand with two months in the books:

Graham–George Offensive Player of the Year

1. Wisconsin RB Melvin Gordon (Last week: 1): The Badgers were off this week, but Gordon still leads the Big Ten with 1,012 rushing yards, to go along with 11 touchdowns, through seven games. He'll get a test this week against Iowa's run defense.

[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
AP Photo/Paul VernonOhio State's Braxton Miller is putting up big numbers in Big Ten play.
2. Ohio State QB Braxton Miller (LW: 3): Yeah, he missed a big chunk of the nonconference season, but Big Ten play is what matters. And that's where Miller is asserting himself. The Buckeyes' quarterback is completing 70.6 percent of his passes with nine touchdowns and only one interception in league action and running for 80 yards per game.

3. Nebraska RB Ameer Abdullah (LW: 2): Abdullah showed he is Nebraska's best player in the Huskers' loss at Minnesota last week. He ran 19 times for 165 yards while shaking off an early injury. Abdullah is averaging 172 rushing yards per game in conference play.

4. Michigan WR Jeremy Gallon (LW: 4): The Wolverines were off last week, giving Gallon time to rest after his Big Ten-record 369 receiving yards vs. Indiana. He's got a huge matchup this week against Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard.

5. Ohio State RB Carlos Hyde (LW: Not ranked): Like Miller, Hyde was a nonfactor in the nonconference season. But he's averaging 137 yards per game in league games and has seven rushing touchdowns in the Buckeyes' four Big Ten wins.

Nagurski–Woodson Defensive Player of the Year

1. Wisconsin LB Chris Borland (LW: 1): Borland got hurt against Illinois and so has basically been out of action for two weeks. Time to remind us why we ranked him No. 1 this week at Iowa.

2. Ohio State LB Ryan Shazier (LW: 2): He had 10 tackles and a sack against Penn State, and he now is tied for the most tackles for loss in the Big Ten with nine.

3. Michigan State CB Darqueze Dennard (LW: 4): The Spartans should rack up plenty of all-conference honors on defense; Shilique Calhoun, Max Bullough and Denicos Allen are among the very deserving. Dennard gets a showcase matchup against Gallon this week.

4. Minnesota DT Ra'Shede Hageman (LW: 5): His numbers would have been better last week if he didn't have two sacks wiped out by face-mask penalties, but Hageman was still a menace to the Nebraska offense and a big reason why Minnesota's defense has kept the team in just about every game.

5. Iowa LB James Morris (LW: NR): He had eight tackles, a pair of sacks and a fumble recovery against Northwestern last week, continuing a standout senior season for the Hawkeyes' defensive leader.

Kwalick-Clark Tight End of the Year

1. Devin Funchess, Michigan: Funchess is really more of a big wide receiver, so if you heavily value blocking from the position, you might look elsewhere. But it's hard to ignore his impact, as he leads all league tight ends with 492 receiving yards, plus four touchdowns.

2. Ted Bolser, Indiana: Bolser gives the Hoosiers yet another outstanding weapon in the passing game, with 247 receiving yards and five touchdowns on the season.

3. C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa: Hawkeyes fans would love to see CJF get even more involved in the offense; he caught the game-winning score in overtime last week against Northwestern and has 17 receptions for 153 yards and four scores this season. The top tight end race is a good one in the league, with Northwestern's Dan Vitale and Wisconsin's Jacob Pedersen also in the mix.

Big Ten lunchtime links

October, 22, 2013
10/22/13
12:00
PM ET
The white zone is for immediate loading and unloading of passengers only. There is no stopping in the red zone.
The One Who Knocks is knocking on the door of a fantasy championship.

My team made it two in a row and four of the last five over Adam's Trombone Shorties with a decisive 119-79 victory last week. For that, I can thank quarterbacks Christian Hackenberg (30) and Devin Gardner (33) for putting up big point totals in their four-overtime game, as well as my timely pickup of the Nebraska defense, which registered 20 points in a near shutout of Purdue. Those three alone would have been enough to beat Adam's team, which got 23 points from Melvin Gordon and 18 from Ameer Abdullah but not enough anywhere else.

That gives me a 5-2 season edge, and I'm just three more wins from claiming the season championship. But once again, the double bye is making things interesting, so this thing is far from over. On to our Week 8 pickups …

Adam adds Ohio State QB Braxton Miller and drops Northwestern QB Trevor Siemian

Rationale: I need a second-half boost, and so does Miller, who had a big fourth quarter against Northwestern and faces an Iowa defense that still could be vulnerable to a dual-threat quarterback.

Brian adds Ohio State RB Carlos Hyde and drops Penn State RB Zach Zwinak

Rationale: Zwinak wasn't doing much for me and now is on a bye. Hyde will face a tough Iowa defense that hasn't allowed a rushing touchdown, but I'll take my chances with the Buckeyes' workhorse.

Adam adds Michigan State RB Jeremy Langford and drops Nebraska RB Ameer Abdullah

Rationale: Abdullah is off this week, and Lankford faces a Purdue defense that has allowed a league-worst 16 rush touchdowns (four more than any other team). This might not be a long-term move, but Langford has elevated his game for an improving Spartans offense.

Brian adds Wisconsin RB James White and drops Northwestern RB Venric Mark

Rationale: Mark just can't stay healthy, while White could join teammate Gordon in having a big day at Illinois this week.

Adam adds Michigan TE/WR Devin Funchess and drops Northwestern WR Tony Jones

Rationale: Although Jones should improve on his 1-point total from last week against Minnesota, Funchess' production has surged in recent weeks. I like him going against a vulnerable Indiana defense.

Brian adds Michigan State QB Connor Cook and drops Penn State QB Christian Hackenberg

Rationale: Strictly a bye week move here. Going to gamble on Cook against a struggling Purdue defense.

Brian adds Ohio State defense and drops Nebraska's defense

Rationale: The Huskers served me well last week but go back on another bye. I'll take the Buckeyes at home against Iowa and hope for some big plays.

Brian add Michigan's kickers and drops Penn State's kickers

Rationale: Yet another bye week move. I'll bet on a bounce-back from Brendan Gibbons. Should be lots of scoring chances against Indiana.

Our complete rosters for Week 8:

The Trombone Shorties (Adam)

Ohio State QB Braxton Miller
Indiana QB Nate Sudfeld
Wisconsin RB Melvin Gordon
Michigan State RB Jeremy Langford
Michigan WR Jeremy Gallon
Michigan WR/TE Devin Funchess
Michigan State kickers
Michigan State defense

The One Who Knocks (Brian)

Michigan QB Devin Gardner
Michigan State QB Connor Cook
Wisconsin RB James White
Ohio State RB Carlos Hyde
Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis
Penn State WR Allen Robinson
Michigan kickers
Ohio State defense

Big Ten lunchtime links

October, 17, 2013
10/17/13
12:00
PM ET
I assume I'm an alternate for the selection committee.
  • Braxton Miller had a couple things to work on during the bye week, starting with getting his knee fully healthy and shoring up his ball security as the Ohio State quarterback prepared for Iowa.
  • The thrilling win Christian Hackenberg helped Penn State pull off last weekend might be an early chapter in his book, but it's one that won't be skimmed over down the line.
  • Iowa offensive lineman Andrew Donnal, born a fan of the Buckeyes, has had to do some redecorating in the family home and is looking to make a successful return to the Horseshoe.
  • Just like his mother, Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi can still see room for his elite defense to improve.
  • Michigan is designing mismatches for Devin Funchess in a new wide receiver/tight end hybrid role, and it has paid off with three touchdowns in the last two weeks.
  • Nebraska picked up a couple of impressive wins between its bye weeks, and suddenly things are starting to look more optimistic for its beleaguered defense.
  • After struggling to find much consistency on the ground over the last couple of games, Minnesota is expecting a bit more breathing room for its rushing attack against Northwestern.
  • The Illinois secondary is largely coming up empty in the interception department, and the defensive line isn't generating many sacks. Both units rank last in the country in those statistical categories and are trying to climb out of the cellar.
  • Now 60 years in the past, Purdue's memorable upset of top-ranked Michigan State still remains clear in the minds of a few who witnessed it.
  • Wisconsin right tackle Rob Havenstein can pop in film of his play last season for reminders of how far he has come as a blocker. The next step is becoming a "dominant force."

Big Ten picks rewind: Week 7

October, 14, 2013
10/14/13
3:30
PM ET
The most perfect moment of my week occurred at 1:38 a.m. Thursday, as we welcomed our son into the world. It's the greatest feeling the world, as you parents out there know. Even an 0-4 showing in the Big Ten picks wouldn't have wiped the smile off my face.

Turns out, my perfect week was just getting started. I went 4-0 on the slate, thanks to Penn State's dramatic four-overtime win against Michigan, and moved one game ahead of Bennett in the season standings.

WEEK 7/SEASON RECORD

Adam Rittenberg: 4-0, 51-8
Brian Bennett: 3-1, 50-9

Here's one last look at the Week 7 predictions made by us and our guest forecaster, Barry Uphoff from Palo Alto, Calif.

It's rewind time …

Indiana at Michigan State
  • Brian Bennett's pick: Michigan State 28, Indiana 21
  • Adam Rittenberg's pick: Michigan State 30, Indiana 20
  • Actual score: Michigan State 42, Indiana 28
  • 20-20 hindsight: We both had fairly high score predictions for a game involving Michigan State, but evidently not high enough as the Spartans offense is starting to blossom. Brian correctly pegged a big game from Spartans RB Jeremy Langford (109 rush yards, 3 TDs), while my predictions for Nate Sudfeld, Trae Waynes and Macgarrett Kings fell short.
Nebraska at Purdue
  • Bennett's pick: Nebraska 38, Purdue 14
  • Rittenberg's pick: Nebraska 38, Purdue 21
  • Actual score: Nebraska 44, Purdue 7
  • 20-20 hindsight: We both came close on the Huskers' score but expected more from Danny Etling and the Purdue offense against a defense that had been vulnerable most of the season. Nebraska QB Tommy Armstrong had a first-half touchdown run, not touchdown pass, as I had forecast, but Ameer Abdullah (126 rush yards) nearly nailed my prediction (130 rush yards). The Huskers picked off Etling just once, not twice, as Brian predicted they would.
Northwestern at Wisconsin
  • Bennett's pick: Wisconsin 33, Northwestern 30
  • Rittenberg's pick: Wisconsin 31, Northwestern 27
  • Actual score: Wisconsin 35, Northwestern 6
  • 20-20 hindsight: Another prediction where we came close on one team's score and completely whiffed on the other team's. Then again, who expected Northwestern to forget to show up at Camp Randall Stadium? Wisconsin RB Melvin Gordon had one long touchdown run (a 71-yarder), not the two I predicted, and Northwestern had no special teams touchdown (or any touchdown, for that matter). Joel Stave and Jared Abbrederis connected for one score, not the two Brian had predicted.
Michigan at Penn State
  • Bennett's pick: Michigan 28, Penn State 24
  • Rittenberg's pick: Penn State 38, Michigan 35
  • Actual score: Penn State 43, Michigan 40 (4 OT)
  • 20-20 hindsight: I didn't see this one going to four overtimes, but otherwise I made a pretty strong forecast, as Penn State won a shootout by the predicted margin. Lions QB Christian Hackenberg eclipsed 250 pass yards, as I predicted, and Michigan QB Devin Gardner came up just 10 yards shy. Gardner and Jeremy Gallon (seven catches, 95 yards, TD) attacked Penn State's secondary, as Bennett thought they would, although Devin Funchess (112 yards receiving) had the bigger night and Zach Zwinak (eight carries, 24 yards) was quiet.

You've seen how we performed. Now it's time to check on our guest picker, Barry.

Michigan State 31, Indiana 21
Nebraska 35, Purdue 24
Wisconsin 35, Northwestern 28
Michigan 27, Penn State 24

Not too shabby with a 3-1 mark, although those score predictions need a little work, Barry. Like us, you expected something from Purdue and Northwestern and got next to nothing. The scoreboard operator in Happy Valley was a little busier than you expected.

Who's our next guest picker? Tell us why you should be the choice here and here.

Big Ten lunchtime links

October, 8, 2013
10/08/13
12:00
PM ET
The Bro Code has been around for centuries. Nay, whatever's more than centuries.
Ohio State hasn't been dominant or error-free the past two weeks, but the Buckeyes keep finding ways to win. Urban Meyer remains unbeaten in Columbus after an extremely hard-fought game at Northwestern, as Ohio State had to rally from halftime and fourth-quarter deficits.

Knock the Buckeyes if you'd like, but they've won 18 consecutive games, the longest streak in the nation.

It could turn out that the Buckeyes' past two opponents, Wisconsin and Northwestern, both could make cases for being the league's No. 2 squad. We've been more impressed with the one-loss Wildcats than undefeated Michigan, which gets its own shot at Ohio State on Nov. 30 at the Big House. Not much separates Northwestern, Michigan and Wisconsin right now.

Michigan State and Indiana make positive moves in the rankings, while Iowa, Penn State and Minnesota fall.

Let's take one final look at the Week 5 Power Rankings.

Here's this week's rundown ...

1. Ohio State (6-0, 2-0 Big Ten; last week: 1): For a while it looked like Ohio State's run of perfection would come to an end Saturday night. Quarterback Braxton Miller looked rattled, and Northwestern moved the ball well against the Buckeyes' defense. But Ohio State regrouped midway through the third quarter and made enough plays on both sides of the ball to survive another tough test. Meyer stuck with Miller after considering Kenny Guiton, running back Carlos Hyde had a big night and the young Buckeyes defense stopped the run when it needed to in the fourth quarter.

2. Northwestern (4-1, 0-1; last week: 2): The talent differential that plagued Northwestern for years isn't there as much anymore, as the Wildcats can keep pace with any team in the league. The problem: They still struggle to finish big games. They might have been a yard away from upsetting Ohio State but couldn't convert a fourth-and-1 in plus territory. The inability to finish drives cost Pat Fitzgerald's crew, which held Ohio State's offense out of the end zone for nearly three quarters. Venric Mark provided a big boost in his return from injury.

3. Michigan (5-0, 1-0; last week: 4): Michigan needed a clean game and got one against Minnesota, as the Wolverines had zero turnovers in a 42-13 victory. Quarterback Devin Gardner was efficient in the pocket, and tight end Devin Funchess had career highs in both catches (seven) and receiving yards (151). Michigan's defense settled down nicely after allowing an early touchdown, as Minnesota couldn't get the explosion plays it needed to hang around. The Wolverines head back on the road this week in Happy Valley.

4. Wisconsin (3-2, 1-1; last week: 3): The Badgers had an extra week to think about their missed opportunities at Ohio State before resuming play with another big game against Northwestern. Standout running back Melvin Gordon is expected back from a knee injury, and the off week came at a good time to boost the team's overall health. Wisconsin's defense had some struggles against Ohio State's spread offense and faces another spread team this week in Northwestern.

5. Nebraska (4-1, 1-0; last week: 5): Although the Huskers didn't move up in the rankings, we feel better about their ability to rise up after seeing their defense step up against a big-play Illinois offense. Young defenders like Jared Afalava, Michael Rose and Randy Gregory performed well, and veteran nickelback Ciante Evans had two tackles for loss and a forced fumble. Nebraska's biggest issue might be at quarterback, as freshman Tommy Armstrong Jr. delivered in place of the hobbled Taylor Martinez. Armstrong received plenty of help from running back Ameer Abdullah (225 rush yards, 2 TDs).

6. Michigan State (4-1, 1-0; last week: 7): We knew the Spartans had a defense, which showed up big in the second half at Iowa, especially against the run. The big news is the Spartans also have a quarterback in Connor Cook, who passed for 277 yards and two touchdowns, finding both Macgarrett Kings Jr. and Bennie Fowler for big plays. Cook was visibly upset at Notre Dame, questioning the coaches' faith in him after being pulled on the final drive. He restored that faith Saturday and put Michigan State in position to challenge for a division title.

7. Iowa (4-2, 1-1; last week: 6): Mark Weisman and the power run game had been Iowa's identity through the first five weeks. But Michigan State stopped Weisman (seven carries, 9 yards) and completely shut down Iowa's offense in the second half. The Hawkeyes once again fell victim to a special-teams fake and couldn't stop big pass plays from Michigan State. Several injuries mounted up for Iowa, and while most don't appear to be serious, the open week comes at a good time before a trip to Ohio State.

8. Indiana (3-2, 1-0; last week: 11): The off week clearly paid off for Kevin Wilson's crew, which breathed life back into its bowl hopes with an excellent performance against Penn State. Quarterback Nate Sudfeld (321 pass yards, 2 TDs) bounced back nicely from his struggles against Missouri, wide receiver Cody Latimer (nine catches, 140 yards, fumble recovery) had a huge day and the defense contained Penn State's run game. Indiana's offense faces a much bigger test this week at Michigan State, but the Hoosiers head to East Lansing with some confidence.

9. Penn State (3-2, 0-1, last week: 8): Bill O'Brien's team has some serious problems after falling to Indiana for the first time in team history. The defense didn't show up against a spread offense for the second time in three games, and Indiana completely dominated the fourth quarter. Penn State has something special with Christian Hackenberg and wide receiver Allen Robinson, but the defense clearly has taken a step back. Things only get tougher with Michigan and Ohio State up next.

10. Illinois (3-2, 0-1; last week: 9): There's no doubt Illinois has improved this season, but by how much? The Illini never mounted a serious challenge against Nebraska, even though the Huskers played without Martinez, as Tim Beckman's crew fell behind 30-5 early in the third quarter. Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase has gone from great (Cincinnati) to shaky (Washington) to great (Miami University) to shaky (Nebraska). But the bigger issue is a defense that surrendered 335 rush yards to the Huskers. Illinois is off this week before a critical home stretch against Wisconsin and Michigan State.

11. Minnesota (4-2, 0-2; last week: 10): It has been a rough few weeks both on and off the field for the Gophers, who dropped their second straight game and played without head coach Jerry Kill, who remained in Minneapolis after suffering another seizure Saturday morning. Minnesota enters an off week, which will put more attention on Kill and his health. The Gophers once again lack enough explosiveness on offense to do much damage against Big Ten defenses. Minnesota resumes play Oct. 19 at Northwestern.

12. Purdue (1-4, 0-1; last week: 12): The open week gave Darrell Hazell's crew a chance to regroup. Unfortunately, an off-field issue surfaced involving wide receiver B.J. Knauf, who has been suspended for the next two games. It will be interesting to see how freshman quarterback Danny Etling performs after some time to practice as the starter. Purdue's struggling defense will be tested again as the high-powered Nebraska Cornhuskers visit Ross-Ade Stadium.

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Scene and Heard: Top 10 Predictions
In a conversation with ESPN's Antonietta Collins, national recruiting reporter Gerry Hamilton breaks down the recruiting momentum building at Auburn and offers predictions for where the top 10 recruits will commit.Tags: Trenton Thompson, Kerryon Johnson, Jeffery Holland, Martez Ivey, Torrance Gibson, Cece Jefferson, ESPN 300, RecruitingNation, high school football recruiting, Gerry Hamilton
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