Big Ten Week 6: Did you know?

October, 4, 2013
10/04/13
10:00
AM ET
Some parents play classical music to their children when they’re in utero. You should probably read them Big Ten football facts, too. It’s always good to have a well-rounded child.


  • Braxton Miller is a very good quarterback. Everyone knows that. In 2012, he was one of five players in the country to pass for 2,000 yards and rush for 1,000. But he has also gotten better every year. As a freshman he completed just 53.5 percent of his passes inside the pocket, averaging 6.4 yards per attempt. In 2012 those numbers improved to 59.8 percent and 8.3 yards per attempt. And this season, he’s completing 69.2 percent of his passes inside the pocket and averaging 8.7 yards per attempt. Those improvements come from his training in the offseason, but he has also stayed inside the pocket more this season. Eighty percent of his passes this year have come inside the pocket as opposed to last season when just 67 percent of his passes were thrown from inside the pocket.
  • Northwestern has the only offense in the Big Ten that averages more than 225 yards per game both rushing and passing and a big reason is because of its two-quarterback system. Kain Colter and Trevor Siemian are both talented, but have different skill sets. Colter has been in on 140 snaps this season while Siemian has been in for 141. When Colter is in, the Wildcats will execute a rushing play 75 percent of the time and on those plays, they average 6.5 yards per play. When Siemian is in, Northwestern rushes 50 percent of the time, and on those plays the Wildcats gain 7.1 yards per play on average.
  • When Penn State and Indiana take the field this weekend, history will be on the side of the Nittany Lions. PSU holds a 16-0 record (included NCAA vacated wins) over Indiana since 1993 -- Penn State’s first season in the Big Ten. The closest game between the two teams came on Oct. 28, 2000, when Penn State came away with a three-point victory. The largest margin of victory for the Nittany Lions was on Nov. 15, 2003, when Penn State ran away with a 45-point win (52-7).
  • Indiana has a battle of the classes this season. With just 10 seniors on its roster the Hoosiers account for the fourth fewest seniors on a team in college football. But already eight true freshmen have seen playing time for the Hoosiers.
  • Michigan was given a gift of sorts with a bye week last weekend after lackluster performances against Akron and Connecticut. And it bodes well for the Wolverines, who have come away with wins in nine of their last 10 games following a bye. The lone loss was in 2010 when the Wolverines traveled to State College to face the Nittany Lions after a bye week. Penn State came away with a 41-31 win behind a huge offensive performance from former QB Matt McGloin (250 passing yards, 2-of-2 on fourth downs and 0 turnovers).
  • Last season when Michigan State and Iowa met, the Hawkeyes came away with a three-point victory in double overtime. Unfortunately for the Spartans, they were accustomed to those kinds of tight losses. Excluding Michigan State’s 20-3 loss to Notre Dame in week three of 2012, the Spartans lost their other five games by a combined 13 points (2.6 points per game).
  • Junior wide receiver Kevonte Martin-Manley leads the Big Ten with 25.78 yards per punt return. Those numbers were heavily aided by his two punt returns for touchdowns (83 yards, 63 yards) against Western Michigan. Without those returns, he would average just 12.29 yards per return, which would put him at fifth in the Big Ten behind Ohio State’s Corey Brown (61.1), Illinois’ V’Angelo Bentley (15.8), Minnesota’s Marcus Jones (13.1) and Penn State’s Jesse Della Valle (12.7).
  • Saturday will mark the first time Nebraska and Illinois meet on the field in a Big Ten game. The last time these two teams played was in 1986 (Nebraska won 59-14), which means none of Nebraska’s current players were born yet to see it. Bo Pelini may or may not have seen it. He would’ve been a senior in high school at the time.
  • Minnesota coach Jerry Kill has the most tenured football staff in the nation. Not only is Minnesota one of just 18 schools to retain all assistants from 2012-13, but also his staff (between his nine assistants and strength and conditioning staff) accounts for 124 years served under Kill. Strength coach Eric Klein has been with Kill the longest (20 years), while linebackers coach Bill Miller is the baby on the staff (three years with Kill).

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