Oregon Ducks: Deone Bucannon

Pac-12's lunch links

May, 6, 2014
May 6
2:30
PM ET
Just remember, football is 80 percent mental and 40 percent physical.

Reviewing the Pac-12 pro days

April, 3, 2014
Apr 3
12:00
PM ET
Washington was the final Pac-12 school to host its pro day Wednesday, essentially putting an end to 40-yard-dash season. Here is a look at some of the conference's top prospects and a few others who helped their cause over the past month.

Arizona (March 6)
Big name: RB Ka'Deem Carey. After getting clocked at 4.70 in the 40 at the combine, Carey's pro day was a bit more intriguing than some of the other big-name players. There was some improvement -- various reports had him in the high 4.6-range -- but it wasn't enough to change the book on him. Still, Carey's production should make up for his perceived shortcomings.
Sleeper: OLB Marquis Flowers. Flowers reportedly ran in the 4.4s and had a good showing in position drills.

Arizona State (March 7)
Big name: DT Will Sutton. The Sun Devils' pro day further cemented what scouts learned at the combine, when he turned in below average numbers. There was slight improvement at the pro day, according to several reports, but nothing to save his falling stock.
Sleeper: RB Marion Grice. Grice was invited to the combine, but didn't participate as he recovers from a broken leg suffered late in the season. He also didn't participate at the pro day, but will hold an individual workout for NFL scouts on April 8.

California (March 19)
Big name: DT Deandre Coleman. Coleman only participated in the bench press at the combine, but fared well in field drills on campus with a reported 40 time in the mid 4.9-range. Coleman is projected by most to be a mid-round selection.
Sleeper: RB Brendan Bigelow. Bigelow was perhaps the player with the most to gain at pro day. The book on him has always been that he's loaded with talent and the physical skills necessary to be an impact player. It didn't happen for the Bears before he decided to leave early for a shot at Sunday football. Despite injuring his hamstring midway through his 40, Bigelow still was reported as running in the high 4.4-range with former Cal running backs Marshawn Lynch and Jahvid Best looking on.

Colorado (March 12)
Big name: WR Paul Richardson. There were 24 teams on hand, with Richardson the obvious prize of the nine that worked out. He only participated in the vertical jump, short shuttle and three-cone drills.
Sleeper: LS Ryan Iverson. Iverson will not be drafted, but after four years as the Colorado long snapper he has a chance to make some money at the next level. His 27 reps on the bench press were a team high. All the Colorado results can be viewed here.

Oregon (March 13)
Big name: RB De'Anthony Thomas. Thomas' 4.50 40 time at the combine was among the disappointments for the conference and turned a perceived strength into average attribute. After his showing in Eugene -- a 4.34 40 time -- the world is back on its axis. On his combine performance, Thomas told the Ducks' official website: “I ran a 4.5 in ninth grade, so I was like, ‘Wow, that’s crazy’. I feel like that made me train harder and I used it as motivation.”
Sleeper: CB Avery Patterson. Patterson was left puzzled by his own performance after putting up just 10 repetitions in the bench press, but the two-year starter remains focused on making the jump to the next level. He's likely the type of player that will have to earn his way on a team via a training camp invitation and possibly a practice squad.

Oregon State (March 14)
Big name: WR Brandin Cooks. The Biletnikoff Award winner could have showed up to the Beavers' pro day as a spectator and it likely wouldn't have mattered. His showing at the combine was enough to solidify his stock as a first-round pick. Cooks didn't take part in field drills, but did run routes.
Sleeper: WR Micah Hatfield. Yes, a receiver with 20 career catches helped his cause. One scout told the Oregonian he had Hatfield at 4.33 in the 40 -- the same times Cooks clocked when he was the fastest receiver at the combine.

Stanford (March 20)
Big name: OL David Yankey. Kansas City, Tampa Bay and St. Louis were the only no-shows at Stanford. If the mock drafts are to be trusted, Yankey figures to be the first Stanford player of the board. He improved slightly on the bench press (22 to 25) and clocked the same 40 time (5.48) from the combine.
Sleeper: DE Ben Gardner. Is it fair to call Gardner a sleeper after earning some form of all-Pac-12 recognition the past three years? Probably not, but after not being invited to the NFL combine we'll go ahead and list him here anyways. Gardner benefitted most from the day, quantifying his explosiveness and athleticism with a 39.5-inch vertical jump.

UCLA (March 11)
Big name: OLB Anthony Barr. After running a 4.66 40 at the combine, Barr was clocked at 4.45 to ease any lingering doubt about his straight-line speed. Barr helped his case to become a top-10 pick and will likely be the first player from the Pac-12 selected.
Sleeper: RB Malcolm Jones. The Gatorade national high school player of the year never developed into the player UCLA fans were hoping for, but he's still hanging on to hopes of an NFL career. He was credited with a 4.57 40 at the Bruins' pro day.

USC (March 12)
Big name: WR Marqise Lee. Lee went Jerry Seinfeld and chose not to run, letting his combine performance serve as the final measurement of his ability. After not lifting in Indianapolis, Lee finished with 11 reps in the bench. He's tagged for the first round.
Sleeper: DE Morgan Breslin. Like Gardner, who he has been working out with in San Ramon, Calif., Breslin was a combine snub. He ran a 4.75 40, put up 26 reps on the bench and registered a 35.5-inch vertical jump. Here are the complete results for the 18 players who took part.

Utah (March 19)
Big name: CB Keith McGill. One of the fastest risers since the season has ended, McGill decided to participate in every drill despite a good showing at the combine. His 40 time (4.52) was a hundredth of second slower than what he did at combine, and his vertical leap (35.5) was about four inches less.
Sleeper: FB Karl Williams. The 240-pound former walk-on clocked a 4.5, which will could give him a shot to get in a training camp.

Washington (April 2)
Big name: RB Bishop Sankey. Content with his good showing in Indy, Sankey elected to just run the 60-yard shuttle and catch passes. Most mock drafts have Sankey, who left with a year of eligibility remaining, as the No. 2 running back.
Sleeper: QB Keith Price. There were 19 quarterbacks at the combine, but Price was not one of them, marking the first time since at least 1999 that the conference didn't send a quarterback -- and it could be longer -- we could only find combine rosters dating back that far. Price got good reviews for his performance Wednesday, but it would still be surprising if he gets drafted.

Washington State (March 13)
Big name: S Deone Bucannon. WSU's remote location and limited number of pro prospects resulted in less than a dozen scouts on hand, but those that were there got to see one of the conference's most intriguing prospects. Bucannon just participated in position drills after performing well across the board in Indianapolis.
Sleeper: K Andrew Furney. Furney showed a leg capable of hitting from beyond 60 yards and further established himself as a potential candidate for training camp invitations.
On Monday, we took a look at how the Pac-12's offensive players stack up as NFL prospects in the eyes of ESPN analysts Mel Kiper Jr. and Todd McShay. Tuesday, it's the defense's turn.

Defensive line

  • DE Scott Crichton, Oregon State: No. 4 (Kiper), No. 5 (McShay)
  • DT Will Sutton, Arizona State: No. 8 (Kiper), No. 10 (McShay)

If you've been following along since the end of the season, Sutton's spot isn't all too surprising. He didn't have a good showing at the combine and has taken heat about his physical condition, dating to before last season. Even with the concerns, it's hard to imagine he won't eventually find his way in the NFL. After all, he's only the second player in conference history to be a two-time Defensive Player of the Year. Washington's Steve Emtman (1990-91) was the other. That's not by accident.

Coincidentally, the SEC's Defensive Player of the Year, Michael Sam, isn't ranked in the top 10 by either. See the list here. Insider

Other Pac-12 defensive linemen who figure to be in the mix in the draft are Cassius Marsh (UCLA), Taylor Hart (Oregon), Deandre Coleman (Cal), George Uko (USC), Tenny Palepoi (Utah), Morgan Breslin (USC), Ben Gardner (Stanford) and Josh Mauro (Stanford).

Linebacker

  • [+] EnlargeAnthony Barr
    Kirby Lee/USA TODAY SportsFormer UCLA linebacker Anthony Barr could be the first Pac-12 player to be drafted this year.
    OLB Anthony Barr, UCLA: No. 2 (both)
  • OLB Trent Murphy, Stanford: No. 6 (Kiper), No. 9 (McShay)
  • ILB Shayne Skov, Stanford: No. 3 (both)
  • ILB Jordan Zumwalt, UCLA: No. 8 (Kiper)

Barr is widely considered the Pac-12's best hope at landing in the first 10 picks, but if McShay was drafting, that wouldn't be the case. On drafting Barr, McShay wrote:
[Barr] of UCLA is a speed-rusher who stalls out when attempting to convert speed to power, and there is too much finesse to his game for me to pay a top-15 price for him. He looks like he's on skates when he attempts to set the edge.

That's not exactly a ringing endorsement for the same player Stanford coach David Shaw compared to Jevon Kearse. Shaw called Barr called the best (defensive) player the conference has had in the "last few years."

Murphy is in a similar boat to Sutton in that his college production isn't necessarily being viewed as a lock to translate to the NFL. He still figures to be a good fit for a 3-4 team and should be expected to contribute right away.

Outside of the four listed, it wasn't a very deep year for linebackers in the conference. Utah's Trevor Reilly, who can play both OLB and DE, Arizona State OLB Carl Bradford and USC's Devon Kennard headline the rest of the NFL hopefuls.

Defensive back

McGill should send a thank you card in Pete Carroll's direction. It's largely because of Seattle's use of big-bodied corners en route to a Super Bowl victory that the league appears to be trending in that direction. At 6-foot-4, McGill's size -- in addition to his solid showing at the combine -- is a rare asset among the group of corners.

Bucannon looks like he'll be the first defensive back off the board, but will he be a first-round pick? That's unlikely, but it would be a surprise if he lasts into the third round.

Another storyline to watch is where the three defensive backs who left early -- safety Ed Reynolds (Stanford), cornerback Terrance Mitchell (Oregon) and cornerback Kameron Jackson (Cal) -- wind up.

See the lists for linebackers and defensive backs here.Insider
You remember the three-headed monster, right? It's about returning production that will scare -- terrify! --opponents. Or not.

On offense, it's elite combinations at quarterback, running back and receiver.

On defense, it's elite combinations of a leading tackler, a leader in sacks and leader in interceptions.

This year, we're breaking things down by division. We've already done offense for the South and North divisions. Wednesday we looked at defenses in the South.

Next up: North Division defensive three-headed monsters.

1. Stanford

LB A.J. Tarpley, DE Henry Anderson, S Jordan Richards

The skinny: The Cardinal lose their top tackler (Shayne Skov) and top sack guy (Trent Murphy). But there are others ready to take control. Tarpley has long been one of the league’s most underappreciated linebackers (93 tackles last season) and Anderson’s return boosts a front seven that should continue to party in the backfield. Richards is solid at one safety spot, though there are some questions about who will play opposite him. The Cardinal still boast the top defense in the league until proven otherwise.

2. Washington

LB Shaq Thompson, DE Hau’oli Kikaha, DB Marcus Peters

The skinny: The Huskies have some losses, like everyone else in the country, but there is plenty of talent coming back for the new coaching staff to work with. That returning production is enough to slot them No. 2. Thompson continues to get better with each season and appears on the verge of a breakout year. Kikaha has not-so-quietly turned into one of the Pac-12’s most feared rushers (13 sacks last season) and Peters is back after making five interceptions last season. They lose some leadership with the departure of Sean Parker and there's some question marks in the secondary. But this should be a salty group in 2014.

3. Oregon

LB Derrick Malone, DE/OLB Tony Washington, CB Ifo Ekpre-Olomu.

The skinny: Despite losing Avery Patterson, Brian Jackson and Terrance Mitchell, the secondary still boasts one of the top defensive backs in the country in Ekpre-Olomu. Mitchell led the team with five picks in 2013, but a lot of teams opted not to test Ekpre-Olomu. Malone is back after making 105 tackles, and Rodney Hardrick should be on his heels as top tackler. The linebackers should be a strength. Washington returns after recording 7.5 sacks to go with 12 tackles for a loss. Now, if they could just get off the dang field on third down ...

4. Oregon State

S Tyrequek Zimmerman, DE Dylan Wynn, CB Steven Nelson

The skinny: Zimmerman brings his 104 tackles back from last season and the return of OLB Michael Doctor, the team’s leading tackler in 2012, should be a nice boost. Replacing the production of Scott Crichton and his 7.5 sacks will be difficult. Linebacker D.J. Alexander and Wynn should see their share of time in the backfield. Nelson, a former junior college transfer, had a spectacular first season with the Beavers with a team-high six interceptions (tied with Rashaad Reynolds) and eight breakups.

5. Washington State

LB Darryl Monroe, DT Xavier Cooper, ?

The skinny: Do-all safety Deone Bucannon is gone after leading the team in tackles (114) and interceptions (6). He was an All-American for a reason. Monroe is an obvious choice for tackles, and Cooper is the obvious choice for sacks. But the secondary is wide open. Mike Leach has essentially said all four spots in the secondary are up for grabs. Clouding the issues is the future of cornerback Daquawn Brown, who has legitimate experience but also some legal hurdles to overcome.

6. California

S Michael Lowe, LB Jalen Jefferson, S Avery Sebastian?

The skinny: We all know about the defensive injury issues the Bears had last season, which is why Lowe returns as the leading tackler and tied for the lead in interceptions with one (the Bears only had five all last season). Jefferson returns with the most sacks, and Kyle Kragen appears to be a good fit for the scheme. (Remember when Kameron Jackson had three in one game!) We’ll see how oft-injured but talented Stefan McClure fares at safety. Getting Sebastian back from injury will help in the secondary. The pass rush should be improved with Brennan Scarlett’s return.
Happy Friday.

Pac-12's lunch links

March, 20, 2014
Mar 20
2:15
PM ET
When Chekhov saw the long winter, he saw a winter bleak and dark and bereft of hope. Yet we know that winter is just another step in the cycle of life. But standing here among the people of Punxsutawney and basking in the warmth of their hearths and hearts, I couldn't imagine a better fate than a long and lustrous winter.
 
Our look at position groups in the Pac-12 continues with the safeties.

Arizona: The Wildcats have a lot of experience at safety with a combined 78 starts between Jourdon Grandon, Tra'Mayne Bondurant and Jared Tevis. All three of their backups on the AdvoCare V100 Bowl depth chart -- Anthony Lopez, William Parks and Jamar Allah -- also return.

Arizona State: Damarious Randall returns as one of the more talented safeties in the conference after a season in which he finished tied for third on the team with 71 tackles. Marcus Ball is a strong candidate to eventually earn the job next to Randall, but he's still working his way back from a clavicle injury that cost him the 2013 season. Laiu Moeakiola, who appeared in 10 games last year as a reserve, James Johnson, Jayme Otomewo and Ezekiel Bishop are other names to watch.

California: Cal started five different players at safety last year and four of them -- Michael Lowe, Cameron Walker, Avery Sebastian and Damariay Drew -- will be back. Sebastian began the year in the starting lineup and had an interception and 10 tackles before suffering a season-ending Achilles tear in the first half of the season opener. Look for him to regain his starting job next to Lowe.

Colorado: The Buffs need to replace SS Parker Orms, who had 26 career starts and 10 last season, but FS Jered Bell will return. All three of the players competing to replace Orms -- Marques Mosley, Terrel Smith and Tedric Thompson -- have started at least three games. Smith redshirted last season after he underwent shoulder surgery and has 19 career starts.

Oregon: The Ducks lose both Brian Jackson and Avery Patterson from a secondary that has consistently been among the nation's best. Fifth-year senior Erick Dargan, Patterson's high school teammate, looks to slide into his first full-time starting role after three years of meaningful contributions on both special teams and reserve duty. Opposite him, Issac Dixon is the presumed favorite with Tyree Robinson and Reggie Daniels also in the mix.

Oregon State: The Beavers have both Ryan Murphy and Tyrequek Zimmerman back for their third year as starters, which should help soften the blow of losing CB Rashaad Reynolds. A few others to watch are sophomore Cyril Noland-Lewis, Justin Strong, Brandon Arnold, Zack Robinson and walk-on Micah Audiss, who was No. 2 behind Zimmerman in the season-ending depth chart.

Stanford: Ed Reynolds' early departure for the NFL creates the one real unknown spot for the Cardinal. Two former offensive players -- QB Dallas Lloyd and WR Kodi Whitfield -- are in the competition for the vacant spot, as is Kyle Olugbode. Zach Hoffpauir will join the competition once baseball season is over. The winner will play next to Jordan Richards, a senior who has started the past two seasons and played regularly as a freshman.

UCLA: Starters Randall Goforth and Anthony Jefferson are both back after being named all-Pac-12 honorable mention last season. Two names to watch are Tahaan Goodman and Tyler Foreman, both of whom arrived as part of the Class of 2013.

USC: Su'a Cravens and Josh Shaw are back, but the Trojans will have to replace Dion Bailey, who left early for the NFL after converting to safety from linebacker last year. Shaw could wind up back at corner, which would open the door for Leon McQuay III. Gerald Bowman got a medical redshirt after appearing in three games last year and should provide depth.

Utah: Veteran Eric Rowe is set to begin his fourth year as a starter in the Utes' secondary, but he'll play next to a new player with Michael Walker out of eligibility. Charles Henderson was Walker's primary backup last season, but look for junior-college transfer Tevin Carter -- a former Cal Bear -- to challenge him for the starting job.

Washington: The Huskies are looking to fill both starting spots and will likely do so with young players. Sophomores Brandon Beaver, Kevin King and Trevor Walker all saw spot duty last year and the program signed an impressive crop of high school safeties, including Bellevue's Bishard “Budda” Baker.

Washington State: Replacing Deone Bucannon means replacing one of the school's all-time greats at his position. Isaac Dotson looks like the favorite to take that spot, but will be pushed by David Bucannon, Darius Lemora and true freshman Markell Sanders, who arrived for spring practice.



I got a FEVER! And the only prescription...is MORE COWBELL!

Lunch links: Rich Rod talks spring

February, 27, 2014
Feb 27
2:30
PM ET
If that’s true, if you don’t know who I am, then maybe your best course ... would be to tread lightly.

Pac-12's lunch links

February, 26, 2014
Feb 26
2:45
PM ET
Yeah, but when was the last time 80,000 people showed up to watch a kid do a damn chemistry experiment?

Pac-12 at NFL combine: Tuesday recap

February, 26, 2014
Feb 26
12:00
PM ET
Before Washington State safety Deone Bucannon made his way to Indianapolis for the NFL combine, he said he wanted to be a first-round pick.

While the first round still seems like a bit of a reach, Bucannon certainly helped his cause Tuesday with an impressive display of athleticism across the board. He turned in the day's fastest 40 time among the Pac-12's six defensive backs that participated (4.49) and ranked in the top-three among safeties in the 40, bench press, vertical jump, broad jump and three-cone drill.

NFL Network's Mike Mayock ranks Bucannon as the draft's No. 5 safety:
"He's got size, and he's got four years of high-quality production," Mayock said. Bucannon, who measured 6-1 and 211 pounds, had 383 tackles and 15 interceptions in his Cougars career. "I like him in the box, but he has the range to play on the back end," Mayock said.
Utah cornerback Keith McGill, who drew solid reviews at the Senior Bowl, also seemingly helped his draft stock by running 4.51 in the 40. Equally impressive was his 39-inch vertical leap which, at 6-foot-3, makes McGill a unique combination of athleticism and size.

McGill fits the mold mentioned here by ESPN's John Clayton:
The other bonus is the draft class offers corners with decent size and long arms. Many teams want to copy what the Seahawks have done with Richard Sherman and others. Going to a man-to-man scheme on the outside of a defense that uses a three-deep zone is going to be the trend if defenses can find the type of corners to run those strategies.

Oregon State receiver Brandin Cooks probably made himself quite a bit of money after running the fastest 40-time among receivers over the weekend, but added $100,000 to his bounty because he did it wearing adidas cleats. The shoe company offered up that amount to whatever player at the combine clocked the fastest 40 time wearing its cleats. Kent State's Dri Archer ran the fast time, but wasn't wearing adidas.

Former Oregon tight end Colt Lyerla earned a payoff of $10,000 from adidas for running the fastest 40 at his position group.

Here are how the defensive backs did in the 40 and bench press:

Cornerback

McGill, Utah: 4.51/did not lift
Rashaad Reynolds, Oregon State: 4.51/20 reps
Terrance Mitchell, Oregon: 4.63/did not lift

Safety

Bucannon, Washington State: 4.49/19 reps
Ed Reynolds, Stanford: 4.57/15 reps
Dion Bailey, USC: 4.66/did not lift

Lunch links: Remembering Ted Agu

February, 25, 2014
Feb 25
2:30
PM ET
Chicks dig me, because I rarely wear underwear and when I do it's usually something unusual. But now I know why I have always lost women to guys like you. I mean, it's not just the uniform. It's the stories that you tell. So much fun and imagination. (RIP Harold Ramis)

Pac-12's lunchtime links

February, 17, 2014
Feb 17
2:30
PM ET
He's fancy, he'll go glove.

The Pac-12 was represented by six players in the Senior Bowl on Saturday, but the group's impact on the game was minimal.

Five of the six were defensive players, with Stanford fullback Ryan Hewitt (3 carries, 11 yards) the lone offensive player from the conference.

Utah cornerback Keith McGill, who drew rave reviews throughout the week, capped his solid trip to Alabama with a good performance that included a game-sealing interception of Miami's Stephen Morris. McGill measured in at 6-3, 214 pounds and has drawn comparisons to former Stanford star Richard Sherman.

Reviews for two-time Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year Will Sutton of Arizona State were mixed, but his production in the game was there. Sutton was tied with Stanford linebacker Trent Murphy for a conference-high four tackles, including one for a 3-yard loss.

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon recorded three tackles, and Cal's Deandre Coleman followed up a well-reviewed week of practice with a pair of tackles.

Oregon receiver Josh Huff and UCLA's duo of linebacker Jordan Zumwalt (groin) and receiver Shaquelle Evans (undisclosed injury) practiced throughout the week, but did not play.
In a Scouts Inc. list of superlatives from the week, only Huff was included Insider. However, Todd McShay mentions McGill in the accompanying video:
Best vertical speed: Josh Huff, Oregon. We were surprised by Huff's quick start and extra gear when tracking the ball down vertically.

Here is the official box score from the game.

Pac-12 stats

Offense
  • Ryan Hewitt, Stanford: 3 carries, 11 yards.
Defense
  • Will Sutton, Arizona State: 4 tackles, 1 tackle for loss
  • Trent Murphy, Stanford: 4 tackles
  • Deone Bucannon, Washington State: 3 tackles
  • Deandre Coleman, Cal: 2 tackles, 0.5 tackles for loss
  • Keith McGill, Utah: 1 tackle, 1 interception
Did not play
  • Josh Huff, Oregon: "precautionary reasons"
  • Shaquelle Evans, UCLA: undisclosed injury
  • Jordan Zumwalt, UCLA: groin injury

Mailbag: Hundley vs. Mariota

January, 24, 2014
Jan 24
5:30
PM ET
Happy Friday. Welcome to the Friday mailbag.

Follow the Pac-12 blog on Twitter.

To the notes!

Jeff from Portland writes: I think it was one of Kevin's chats where someone asked him who the best quarterback in the conference was, and he said it was basically a toss up between Marcus Mariota and Brett Hundley. How do you see it heading into next year? Obviously Hundley has all the potential in the world, but he seemed to be a little more inconsistent than Mariota, and it speaks to Marcus' incredible ability than when his legs were taken away his passing got even better. He's faster, more reliable through the air and has an arm that isn't that far behind, if at all, in terms of strength. Given what we saw in 2013, Mariota has to hold the slight edge at this point, right?

[+] EnlargeMarcus Mariota
Scott Olmos/USA TODAY SportsOregon QB Marcus Mariota gets the nod as the Pac-12's top QB as no one can match his stats over the last two seasons.
Ted Miller: I don't think Kevin thinks it's a toss-up. We just went through the process of ranking the Pac-12's top 25 players and we both agreed that Mariota should rank ahead of Hundley. Mariota's numbers over the past two years have been decisively better than Hundley's.

Now, you could argue that Mariota has had a better supporting cast. And you could point out that Mariota has had a far more experienced offensive line in front of him. I think that would be correct on both counts. Still, I do think Mariota is ahead of Hundley at present.

That said, I think Hundley is pretty much equal to Mariota in terms of pure talent and upside. My expectations is that in 2014 the gap between them will narrow.

The good news is if everything goes to preseason expectations, which it rarely does, we might see them play twice -- once in the regular season and once in the Pac-12 title game. That should help us pick a first-team All-Pac-12 QB, as well as the conference's top Heisman Trophy candidate.

And who might go first in the 2015 NFL draft.

Mark from Chapel Hill, NC writes: Heather Dinich's article on ACC "taking on non-conference powers" -- please defend the honor of the Pac by pointing out that the ACC has 14 teams and plays eight conference games, compared to 12 and nine (with six Pac teams ranked in ESPN's way too early poll, that is hugely important!) so any reasonable evaluation has to adjust for this!

Ted Miller: Oh, I'm not sure I want to talk any trash to Dinich. Not only did her conference win the national title, Dinich is rumored to be a ninja when not relentlessly covering the ACC. At least that's what Chris Low is always telling me.

Well, you are correct. The ACC has 14 teams and plays eight conference games. And, yes, the Pac-12 has 12 teams and plays nine conference games. That, as I have written many times, gives the ACC (and SEC) a built-in advantage over the Pac-12 in that it guarantees the Pac-12 will have six defeats that that ACC can avoid by scheduling a soft nonconference foe. An ACC (or SEC) team can schedule its way to four wins, which means a 2-6 conference record would still make it bowl eligible.

But I think Dinich's point is a valid one: The ACC is ramping up its nonconference scheduling. Take Florida State, the defending national champions. The Seminoles are playing Oklahoma State, Notre Dame and Florida next year. Assuming the Gators get over their 2013 face plant, that's a pretty demanding slate (The Citadel is the fourth foe).

Further, the ACC now has a special relationship with Notre Dame, not unlike USC and Stanford. The Fighting Irish will also face North Carolina (Oct. 11),Syracuse (Sept. 27) and Louisville (Nov. 22), which officially joins the ACC's Atlantic Division on July 1.

Of course, the Pac-12 has been scheduling tough nonconference games for years while also playing a nine-game conference schedule. I think that's the future for every AQ conference in our new system with a four-team College Football Playoff. It's just a matter of time until the ACC as well as the SEC are pushed down that road.

Michael from Las Vegas writes: In ESPN "lunch Links" column -- when you click on the UofW site it takes you to the Seattle Times newspaper and they ask you to buy a subscription for approximately $4 a week before you can read the article.

Ted Miller: This is a new trend in the newspaper business. Papers that have long been free on the Internet are now trying to make money on their product.

It's called capitalism. It can be an annoyance -- what once was free now costs money -- but you have a choice to pay for information or look elsewhere for it.

Ben from Washington, D.C., writes: I know WSU isn't as flashy as, say, Utah and Colorado, but Deone Buchanon is kind of a big star. Really appreciate how you included him for those of us WSU fans. Thanks man.

Ted Miller: You're welcome. We try hard to get things correct, such as not calling Washington State safety Deone “Bucannon” an "early entry" seeing that he was a senior this season.

Oh, wait. Were you being sarcastic after not reading the headline of the story where it says "early entry"?

Eddie from Glendale, Ariz., writes: You should write about how well Pac-12 players did with NFL postseason honors.

Ted Miller: OK.

[+] EnlargeRichard Sherman
Steven Bisig/USA TODAY SportsFormer Stanford star and current Seattle Seahawk Richard Sherman is one of many former Pac-12 players who earned NFL postseason honors.
Here are the Pac-12 players when were named NFL All-Pro by the AP.

Offense (first and second team)

FB Marcel Reece (Washington) Oakland

OT Tyron Smith (USC) Dalls

C Ryan Kalil (USC) Carolina

C Alex Mack (California) Cleveland

Defense (first and second team)

DT Jurrell Casey (USC) Tennessee

LB Vontaze Burfict (Arizona State) Cincinnati

CB Richard Sherman (Stanford) Seattle

CB Alterraun Verner (UCLA) Tennessee

S Eric Weddle (Utah) San Diego

S Jairus Byrd (Oregon) Buffalo

S T.J. Ward (Oregon) Cleveland

P Johnny Hekker (Oregon State) St. Louis

And here are the Pac-12 players selected to the Pro Bowl (note: The Pro Bowl is different this year, as it features teams "drafted" by Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders).

Team Rice

Offense

QB Alex Smith (Utah) Kansas City

TE Tony Gonzalez (California) Atlanta

OT Tyron Smith (USC) Dallas

OT Jordan Gross (Utah) Carolina

C Ryan Kalil (USC) Carolina

Defense

DE Cameron Jordan (California) New Orleans

LB Vontaze Burfict (Arizona State) Cincinnati

CB Alterraun Verner (UCLA) Tennessee

S Jairus Byrd (Oregon) Buffalo

P Johnny Hekker (Oregon State) St. Louis

Team Sanders

Offense

QB Andrew Luck (Stanford) Indianapolis

QB Nick Foles (Arizona) Philadelphia

WR DeSean Jackson (Cal) Philadelphia

TE Jordan Cameron (USC) Cleveland

FB Marcel Reece (Washington) Oakland

OG Kyle Long (Oregon) Chicago

C Alex Mack (Cal) Cleveland

Defense

LB Terrell Suggs (Arizona State) Baltimore

S Eric Weddle (Utah) Kansas City

S T.J. Ward (Oregon) Cleveland

ST Matthew Slater (UCLA) New England

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Drive Through: One-On-One With O'Leary
Andrea Adelson sits down with Florida State tight end and John Mackey Award winner Nick O'Leary to discuss his success this season and his thoughts on facing Oregon in the Rose Bowl game presented by Northwestern Mutual.
VIDEO PLAYLIST video

PAC-12 SCOREBOARD

Saturday, 12/20
Monday, 12/22
Tuesday, 12/23
Wednesday, 12/24
Friday, 12/26
Saturday, 12/27
Monday, 12/29
Tuesday, 12/30
Wednesday, 12/31
Thursday, 1/1
Friday, 1/2
Saturday, 1/3
Sunday, 1/4
Monday, 1/12