Oregon Ducks: Arik Armstead

The Oregon defensive line is breaking it down to the basics this spring with a new slogan for the position group, one that goes all the way back to when most players first started learning the position and were given the most basic of commands on the defensive line.

“Knock back.”

It’s simple. Knock the offensive line back off the line of scrimmage. Knock the ball carriers back. Knock the quarterbacks back. Knock back. It’s also something the group didn’t do a lot of last season as it allowed 3.8 yards per rush (No. 37 nationally) and accounted for just 29 sacks (No. 45 nationally).

Fixing those issues has certainly been their focus this spring, but the slogan has encompassed the goals of this group as it works to fix its problems.

“Our mentality is definitely going to change,” defensive lineman Arik Armstead said. “Last year put kind of a bad taste in most of our mouths. We want to play with a different attitude.”

The defensive line lost Ricky Havili-Heimuli, Wade Keliikipi and Taylor Hart, who accounted for 134 tackles including 16.5 for a loss and 6.5 sacks. Those three losses are all significant, so not only are the Ducks looking for new starters, they’re also looking for depth.


Alex Balducci and DeForest Buckner will be names to watch as possible starters this spring game, but Sam Kamp and Stetzon Bair could be nipping at their heels. Junior college transfer Tui Talia could have a jump on other players just because of his experience at Diablo Valley College, where he was ranked the top defensive end in the ESPN Junior College 50.

“We’ve got some younger guys who haven’t played much and then we have some guys who’ve played in a lot of games who are still young and continue to get better,” Armstead said. “[We’re] just getting the guys with less experience more opportunities to get out there and play more and [we’re] also getting the guys who do have that experience to learn more.”

And that skill of knocking back is going to be the most crucial of all.

Though the 3.8 yards per rush was worrisome for the defense, it was on critical rush plays where the defense struggled the most.

On third-down runs, the defense allowed a 65.5 percent conversion rate. There were only three defenses in the nation that had a worse conversion rate (Memphis, Purdue and New Mexico). On fourth-down runs, Oregon’s defense allowed a 66.7 percent conversion rate. The Ducks jumped to 73rd nationally in that category, but they still trail eight teams in the Pac-12. Those are critical situations in which Oregon must knock back in 2014.

Armstead said that the key to improvement in those categories goes back to the new mentality.

“It just came down to those situations that [other teams] made plays and we didn’t make plays,” Armstead said. “Making plays is a mentality -- just digging down deep and getting those stops in crucial moments when we need them.”


Our look at position groups in the Pac-12 continues.

Arizona: Coach Rich Rodriguez is confident in both Reggie Gilbert and Dan Pettinato and anxious to get junior-college transfers Jeff Worthy, who also spent a year at Boise State, and Jerod Cody acclimated to the system. Calvin Allen, Jack Banda and Luca Bruno are coming off redshirt seasons and represent a group Rodriguez said the team needs production from.

Arizona State: With the departure of Gannon Conway and Davon Coleman, there is a question about the team's depth at end. Without Will Sutton clogging things up next year, the Sun Devils' lack of experience is even more of a concern. Sean O'Grady backed up Conway and Coleman last year, but ASU has several well-regarded junior-college transfers in Edmond Boateng, Marcus Hardison and Demetrius Cherry.

California: The Bears list seven defensive ends, but former junior-college transfer Kyle Kragen and Puka Lopa gained the most experience last season listed at the rush position. Antione Davis was outgoing starter Dan Camporeale's primary backup, but Brennan Scarlett's return is more important. He started nine games in 2012 and has been cleared to play following a hand issue that cost him the 2013 season. Todd Barr, Sione Sina and recent-transfer Jonathan Johnson are also in the mix.

Colorado: Colorado must replace Chidera Uzo-Diribe, but Juda Parker is back for his senior season, and several others have game experience. Samson Kafovalu is the likely candidate to start opposite him after making 18 tackles in seven games last year. Jimmie Gilbert was Uzo-Diribe's backup, Kirk Poston and De'Jon Wilson also played.

Oregon: The Ducks took a hit with the departure of Taylor Hart, who was named second-team All-Pac-12, but have a talented player in Arik Armstead lined up to take his spot. Armstead started five times in 2013 and left the basketball team midseason to shift his focus back to football. T.J. Daniel, Jason Sloan are projected to be in the mix for playing time.

Oregon State: Scott Crichton is gone, but Dylan Wynn remains and will likely be the Beavers' best defensive player a year after finishing fourth on the team in tackles. Lavonte Barnett, Crichton's primary backup in 2013, and Jaswha James figure to compete for the starting job, but there are two others to keep an eye on. Obum Gwacham recently switched from receiver and Mike Riley has been complimentary of Titus Failauga, who is coming off his redshirt.

Stanford: Henry Anderson has a chance to be one of the best defensive players in the conference and Blake Lueders, who switched from OLB, began the spring atop the depth chart. The intriguing prospect is Luke Kaumatule, who was recruited to play defense but began 2013 as the team's starting tight end. Spring will be important for his development, but his raw ability is impressive.

UCLA: Both Ellis McCarthy and Eddie Vanderdoes were all-Pac-12 honorable mention last season and highlight a talented UCLA defensive line. Their return will help account for the loss of Cassius Marsh, who started 12 games last year. Both McCarthy and Vanderdoes can play inside or outside, but the Bruins listed them both at end. Highly recruited DE Kylie Fitts saw playing time as a true freshman last season.

USC: Leonard Williams, the only sophomore named first-team all-Pac-12 on defense last season, is the best in the conference. Delvon Simmons, who sat out last season after transferring from Texas Tech, has a lot of game experience. He started 12 games for the Red Raiders in 2012 and had regular playing time as a freshman there in 2011. Both Simmons and J.R. Tavai, who was an all-Pac-12 honorable mention selection, can play inside or outside.

Utah: There's no replacing Trevor Reilly, who made 100 tackles despite lingering effects from a torn ACL, but Nate Orchard and Hunter Dimick both saw extensive playing time last season. The Utes have five other defensive ends on the roster, but of that group only LT Filiaga made a tackle last season.

Washington: The Huskies are in great shape with the return of Hau'oli Kikaha, a second-team All-Pac-12 selection, Cory Littleton and Evan Hudson. Josh Shirley has 10 career starts, while Joe Mathis and Psalm Wooching provide depth.

Washington State: With Toni Pole expected to move back inside, the depth chart will look similar to how it did going into last season, minus Matt Bock. After making 50 tackles last year, Xavier Cooper will start on one side, with Destiny Vaeao and Lyman Faoliu strong candidates for more playing time. Emmitt Su'a-Kalio is coming off a redshirt, and the Cougars also signed a pair of defensive ends from Hawaii in Kingston Fernandez and Hercules Mata'afa.

Previous positions

Tight end
Quarterback
Running back
Receiver
Offensive line
Defensive tackle
Spring football practice is right around the corner, but several Pac-12 players don't just have football on their minds.

For some, it's baseball season. For others, it's time for track and field.

Interestingly, Oregon State has the most football players participating in track despite not fielding an official men's team.

And a fun fact: Stanford coach David Shaw, who played football at Stanford, also played in one basketball game in the 1993-94 season and participated in a 400-meter race at one track meet.

Here's a list of Pac-12 football players who have or will participate in another sport this year:

[+] EnlargeWark
John Rivera/Icon SMICal outfielder Jacob Wark is also a wide receiver for the Bears.
Jacob Wark, Cal, baseball: After catching two passes for eight yards and a touchdown for the football team, Wark has transitioned to baseball, where he plays outfield. He's 3-for-4 on the season with an RBI.

Robbie McInerney, Cal, baseball: True freshman kicker redshirted during the football season and is a middle infielder on the baseball team. He has not appeared in four games.

Khalfani Muhammad, Cal, track and field: The Bears' leading rusher is currently participating on the indoor track team in sprints. He's recorded the team's third-fastest time in both the 60- and 200-meter dashes.

Dior Mathis, Oregon, track and field: Fifth-year senior cornerback appeared in all 13 games for the football team and has participated in both football and track (sprints) since his freshman year.

Devon Allen, Oregon, track and field: True freshman receiver redshirted during the football season. A sprinter and hurdler in track, Allen set personal bests in both the 60-meter hurdles and 60-meter dash at the Don Kirby Elite meet in Albuquerque, N.M., on Saturday. His time of 7.83 in the hurdles ranks fourth in school history.

Arik Armstead, Oregon, basketball: Armstead, a defensive lineman in football, began the year on the basketball team, but only appeared in one game before leaving the team to focus on football.

Victor Bolden, Oregon State, track and field: Freshman receiver had six catches for 62 yards and ran for 95 yards on 12 carries in football. He's running sprints in track.

Stevie Coury, Oregon State, track and field: Freshman receiver did not appear in a game during the football season, but is showing well in track. He finished sixth in the 60-meter dash at the Husky Classic on Saturday.

Walter Jones, Oregon State, track and field: Freshman receiver finished third in the long jump at the Husky Classic. He did not appear in a game during the football season.

Malcolm Marable, Oregon State, track and field: Cornerback set a personal record in the 60-meter dash (7.07) at the Husky Classic.

Obum Gwacham, Oregon State, track and field: Participated in the high jump at the first indoor meet of the season but has since stop competing in order to focus on his transition to defensive end from receiver.

Ryan Cope, Oregon State, track and field: Cope is expected to run hurdles during the outdoor track season.

Hunter Jarmon, Oregon State, baseball: True freshman receiver redshirted during the football season. He's listed as an outfielder for the baseball team and has made two appearances without a hit.

Zach Hoffpauir, Stanford, baseball: A safety in football, Hoffpauir has started all four games for the Stanford baseball team in right field. He's 4-for-18 with a pair of homers.

John Fullington, Washington State, track and field: Fullington started 43 consecutive games on the offensive line for the WSU football team. He will throw the shot put during the spring.

The list has a chance to grow as several football players have yet to decide whether they will run track during the outdoor season.

Pac-12's lunch links

January, 30, 2014
Jan 30
2:30
PM ET
Now it is done. Now the story ends. And there is no way to tell it. The art of fiction is dead. Reality has strangled invention. Only the utterly impossible, the inexpressibly fantastic, can ever be plausible again.

Mailbag: Is DAT out of position?

December, 27, 2013
12/27/13
5:30
PM ET
Welcome to the final -- Miller version! -- mailbag of 2013.

Follow the Pac-12 blog on Twitter.

To the notes!

Nick from Phoenix writes: Chip Kelly and Oregon surprised many a few years ago when they flipped DeAnthony Thomas from USC by promising him a chance to play offense and not make him a corner, as USC planned to do. After showing some flashes and putting together a pretty good freshman season, he seems to have plateaued as a player. He's got amazing speed and is a tremendous returner but he's too small to be a starting running back and isn't a true WR. After his freshman season I thought he would be guaranteed to leave school after his junior year. Now I can't imagine him being drafted in the first two rounds in April. He's a player without a position. All of this brings me to my question. Did Oregon do him a disservice by making him an offensive player? Given the athletic ability DAT possesses, he would have made an amazing corner and we could possibly be talking about him as a top 5 pick this year. He would still be able to flourish in the return game (where he is at his best). I really think the Oregon staff blew it with him, just like they blew it with Arik Armstead (letting him be an OK defensive lineman when he has the physical skill set to be a transcendent offensive tackle).

[+] EnlargeDe'Anthony Thomas
Jonathan Ferrey/Getty ImagesAfter a hot start, De'Anthony Thomas missed four games and had his least productive season.
Ted Miller: The starting point for this discussion is what the player wants. And that is a slippery slope in recruiting. Often what is obvious to a plurality of seemingly objective observers is not obvious to the player himself. Or his family. Or "advisors."

The good news here is Oregon and USC both told the truth in recruiting. USC coaches told De'Anthony Thomas they saw him as a cornerback. Some coaches will say whatever they can to get a player, all the while having a plan to make a switch as soon as possible. Oregon, obviously, stuck to its word with both Thomas and Armstead.

I think the issue with Armstead is more clear-cut than Thomas. Armstead is a potential NFL All-Pro at left offensive tackle, based on his skill set, and a CFL player on the D-line, based on his performance as defensive end/tackle thus far. I personally think he is leaving millions of dollars on the table by playing defense. In fact, if he were my son, I would relentlessly hound him to make the switch. I might even touch base with the Oregon coaches on the matter to see what they think, though I'm not sure the guy who replaces the retiring Nick Aliotti will want to give up any more big bodies from his D-line, which will take some big hits heading into 2014 in any event.

As for DAT, you could make a strong case that he's more naturally a corner than an offensive player due to his size. But he'd also be on the small side for an NFL corner, and there's the issue of make-up. Does he have the natural aggressiveness to go mano-a-mano in press coverage against a bigger receiver? Can he attack a 220-pound running back in the open field? DAT might be more naturally suited to avoid rather than seek contact.

The question for DAT with the NFL is fit. A team looking for an offensive weapon who's not built for 20 touches a game could do a lot worse than Thomas. The St. Louis Rams fell in love with speedy but diminutive Tavon Austin and picked him in the first round last spring. He's had a pretty darn good rookie season. He seems like a good comparison to DAT (and not the short but stocky guys, such as Maurice Jones-Drew, who are built like fire hydrants).

There is no question DAT's pure athletic ability will get him drafted, this spring or next, though what round is difficult say. The ultimate answer on his NFL career, however, will come down to durability. How many touches -- and games -- can he give an NFL team? And for how many years?

Alex from Davis, Calif., writes: I have a great play idea for Washington State when they have an 8 point lead, ~ 2 minutes to go in a game and the other team is out of timeouts. It may be too wacky and zany for Mike Leach, though. Here's how it goes: the team lines up in a "victory" formation, takes a knee, lets the play clock go as close to zero as possible and repeats the play two more times. Then they take a delay of game penalty before punting to make the other team go more than 25 yards for the winning score. I know, I know. Way too crazy. It make soooooo much more sense to try and run a QB option play (or run the ball at all when you haven't done it all year) than it does to simply take a knee and run the clock.

Ted Miller: I'm with you, as are most folks. Even some with true football smarts, such as other coaches.

But Mike Leach, an unquestionably smart man, does things his own way. His reply would be the ole "I am what I am," which means not taking a knee there, and that is what got him where he is. He believes in being aggressive.

The thing about Leach is he's not going to go, "My bad. I should have done things differently. You second-guessers are correct!" Not his style.

Further, while there were about 785 different things the Cougars could have done to ensure a victory against Colorado State, Leach would simply note the most basic one would be holding onto the football, which I'm guessing he and his assistants have emphasized and drilled endlessly.

Adam from Dallas writes: After watching USC win the Las Vegas bowl and finish up with 10 wins from this crazy season. Saying it sounds unrealistic, but shouldn't Sark almost be expected to get 10 wins next season? Am I crazy?

[+] EnlargeSarkisian
Kirby Lee/USA TODAY SportsSteve Sarkisian might get a bit of a pass in his first year, but expectations at USC are always high.
Ted Miller: While I'll need more information to know, Adam, if you are indeed crazy -- such as: Do you have a 6-foot white rabbit as a wingman when you hit the bars? -- I don't think you are off base here.

For one, USC fans tend to start their baseline of preseason expectations at 10 wins and go from there.

First, let's note that USC won 10 games on a 14-game schedule. It's not the same as the 10-2 mark in 2011. Then let's wait until the NFL defection numbers are in. There are some names on the board who could make a big difference if they opted to return next year.

As it stands now, though, USC should be in the thick of a tightly contested South Division. That, in itself, might make a 10-win season difficult. There could be a lot of cannibalism in the South, as well as the conference as a whole.

I see UCLA as the South favorite, if QB Brett Hundley opts to return for his redshirt junior year. I see Arizona State as possibly taking a step back and Arizona taking a step forward, if it gets a satisfactory answer at quarterback. Utah becomes a factor if QB Travis Wilson is given a positive bill of health from his doctors and can play this fall. And Colorado is getting better.

The good news for USC fans, whatever their 2014 expectations, is the program will be made whole in 2015, as NCAA scholarship restrictions expire. At that point, there won't be much margin for error for Steve Sarkisian. The preseason expectations going forward will be Pac-12 title or bust, with a firm belief the Trojans should win a national title before 2020.

Josh from Wichita writes: Great article on my Cats, Ted. I did just want to make one technical correction though. It is actually a 4x4 that has 'family' written on it and not a 2x4. It's 4 inches by 4 inches, but I suppose it can be forgiven. EMAW!

Ted Miller: My bad. Guess folks won't be asking me to do any construction work anytime soon.

Jon from Berkeley writes: Just wanted to share an awesome video my friend Matt recently made about the Pac-12. Hope you like it!

Ted Miller: That is pretty cool.

DuckFam from Camas, Wash., writes: Dear PAC 12 Blog,I am sorry to say this, but you are absolutely right. The emotions you have stirred have caused such outrage that I am compelled to stand up and point out that Pink Ladies have never gotten their accolades, in spite of being the all-around most balanced in their league. This all starts with the fact that Pink Ladies don't have the history and pedigree of playing in an AQ league that the more traditional power-houses, such as Granny Smiths and Red Delicious have played in; a league, BTW, that is heavily favored east of the Rockies. They are practically unheard of down south, but Georgia is already biased anyway- what is their state famous for, again? Next, when you consider the balance of sweet to tart, combined with the fact that the ratio of crunch to crisp easily rivals that of Honeycrisp, and is far tastier than Fujis, I am not sure you can even consider Fujis any further at this point. Now Honeycrisp is certainly at the top of the game most of the time, and I grant you it is great for what it is, but if this is a case to be made with more than just personal taste and opinions, then it is time to turn to the metrics. Pink Ladies are most often in play at 1.49 per pound, and often break the .99-per-pound barrier, as many traditional ones often do, especially when they are at their best around mid-season. But given the qualities that Pink Ladies offer, as stated above, at the same economic metric as Fujis, make them a far better bet than Honeycrisp (which often hit 1.99, even at their best in the season). When compared pound to pound, or dollar to pound, or the newest metric developed by people with far too much time on their hands: the Approximate Pound Per Label Eaten, or APPLE, as it is known in some circles, Pink Ladies take down all comers, every time. Once again, though, being from a different box that doesn't say Fuji or Honeycrisp means little to no consideration, in spite of obvious fact. Proof yet again of the "tastelessness" of the East Coast bias...PS- is it September yet?

Ted Miller: My only hope is the "Great Apple Controversy of 2013" continues into the New Year.

DL Armstead on 2013 breakout list

May, 2, 2013
5/02/13
10:48
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Travis Haney's breakdown of post-spring breakout players is headlined by Florida State's Jameis Winston, but Oregon DL Arik Armstead also makes the list at No. 15.

Click here Insider to see why Haney expects big things from Armstead and to see who else made the cut.
An issue that seems to arise every year in recruiting is which players Oregon chooses to pursue and sign on the defensive line. It always seems to be a source of worry for fans and recruiting pundits alike.

While Haloti Ngata isn't walking through the tunnel at Autzen Stadium anymore, the Ducks have equipped themselves nicely with a patchwork defensive line over the past few years.


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It isn't often that an athlete who has the ability to play multiple sports in college comes along.

The Oregon Ducks are no stranger to that concept. Highly touted freshman Arik Armstead played a role on defense for the Fiesta Bowl champions, before hitting the hardwood for the sweet 16-bound Ducks. While playing two sports might be an option, or have an appeal to some high school athletes, how do a school's other athletic teams play into their college decision?


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In case you just awoke from a long winter's nap, you might have heard that the Oregon Ducks had some big news this week. Chip Kelly pump-faked everyone and decided that the NFL was worth it. Ducks DL coach Jerry Azzinaro followed him out the door and joined him in Philly.

The DuckNation Mailbag has never been so packed, so let's see what you've got on your mind.

Bob C. (Bakersfield, Calif.): Now that Chip has taken his ego to Philadelphia, who will take over? Can the Ducks maintain their success on the field? What about recruiting?

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Haloti NgataG Fiume/Getty ImagesHaloti Ngata lived up to his five-star hype at Oregon and brought that success to the NFL.

For those Oregon fans who worry about how many commitments the Ducks have at this point in the recruiting cycle, all they need to do is take a look back over the past decade or so, starting with the 2002 recruiting class, when the Ducks landed some guy named Haloti Ngata on signing day.

With a handful of spots to fill in the class of 2013, DuckNation decided to take a look back at who the Ducks have added in the final weeks of the recruiting cycle in each year since 2003.


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Eddie VanderdoesDamon Sayles/ESPN.comOregon was the early favorite for standout Eddie Vanderdoes.

With the decision by head coach Chip Kelly to return to Eugene after nearly leaving for the NFL for the second year in a row, the Ducks are settling in for the stretch run of the 2013 recruiting cycle.

The return of Kelly, a win in the Fiesta Bowl and a No. 2 ranking in the final BCS poll give the Ducks plenty of momentum as they look to close their recruiting class with a bang for the third year in a row.

Here are some of the best questions submitted to the DuckNation mailbag in the past week.


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KellySteve Dykes/Getty ImagesChip Kelly has flirted with the NFL, but it hasn't hurt Oregon's recruiting.

When you have one of the nation's most exciting offenses, top-notch facilities and fashion-forward uniforms, other programs have to combat those advantages. For those programs competing for recruits with the Oregon Ducks, it even means negative recruiting against a team that will appear in its fourth straight BCS bowl next month.

In the past, programs have used Oregon's high-flying offense against them by telling offensive linemen that the zone-blocking scheme and the up-tempo pace won't be as fun or rewarding to play in. They have told wide receiver recruits that they will block more than they will catch the ball.

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Coming off three straight recruiting classes that have loaded Oregon roster with talent and an undefeated season so far, the Ducks are in prime position to close the 2013 recruiting cycle with a bang.

[+] EnlargeMax Redfield
Erik McKinney/ESPN.comAnother great season for Oregon has the Ducks primed to take advantage come signing day, when they hope to ink former USC commit Max Redfield.
Since Chip Kelly's arrival in 2007, Oregon recruiting has taken things to a whole new level. Three consecutive league titles -- and the subsequent BCS appearances -- have helped place the Ducks in the midst of recruiting battles with some of the top programs nationwide. They way they have dismantled every opponent this season has them squarely in the sights of several top prospects from across the country.

While Kelly has built his program by turning unheralded and under-the-radar prospects like Marcus Mariota and Kenjon Barner into stars, he has shown an ability to battle the big boys for top recruits. In each of the past two years, the Ducks have used late pushes to sign California's top prospects -- De'Anthony Thomas and Arik Armstead -- away from USC.

Despite an upset loss to Stanford, the Ducks have had another outstanding year, putting Oregon in position to close strong yet again. The Ducks currently have the nation's No. 23 recruiting class but are still in the mix for several ESPN 150 recruits, including Georgia's Montravius Adams, California's Max Redfield and Florida's Leon McQuay III. Redfield decommitted from USC in early November and is now considering Washington and LSU in addition to the Ducks.

Kelly's crew hung historic numbers on USC (62 points, 730 yards) in front more than a dozen elite 2013 and 2014 recruits. The long-term results remain to be seen, but the immediate reaction of recruits seem to signal that Oregon's Pac-12 dominance is starting to gain traction with recruits in Southern California. Not only did Redfield decommit from the Trojans the day after USC's loss, but several Los Angeles-area prospects from the Class of 2014 came away in awe of what the Ducks accomplished.


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Carl WinstonOtto Greule Jr/Getty ImagesSan Jose, Calif., native Michael Clay was a crucial recruiting win for the Ducks over California in the Class of 2009.
After the Ducks program began to take off in the mid-1990s, California hired former Ducks' offensive coordinator Jeff Tedford in 2002. As the Ducks' upward climb reached a standstill, Cal stepped up and looked like it might be the next in line to challenge USC.

The Golden Bears did win four of five games with the Ducks between 2004 and 2008, including a game for the ages in 2007. After they walked out of Autzen Stadium with a 31-24 win over the No. 5 Ducks, things began to change between the two schools. Cal did win the following season in Berkeley, as the Ducks fumbled gave away a game they dominated. Starting in the class of 2008, the Bears responded by going on an unprecedented run of recruiting success. The Ducks began to dominate the series on the field with a 42-3 win over the Bears in 2009. Despite the dominant performance over the then-No. 6 Bears, Cal beat the Ducks head-to-head for a number of elite recruits from 2008 to 2012.

Whether it was location, academics, Cal's plans for facilities upgrades -- which are now complete -- or former Cal assistant -- and current Washington assistant -- Tosh Lupoi, the Bears won the majority of the recruiting battles between the two schools. Similar to the recent history with USC, the Ducks don't care about recruiting rankings as much as they do the on-field results.

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Max RedfieldErik McKinney/ESPN.comESPN 150 Max Redfield is back on the market after decommitting from USC on Sunday, and Oregon is looking forward to the chance to get him on campus.
After a second straight win against USC in Los Angeles gave Oregon its 13th consecutive road victory -- and 12th straight win overall -- the Ducks are flying high, and recruits are taking notice.

In recent years, the Ducks have made a habit of sitting back and letting things play out in recruiting. Last year, they added two ESPN 150 players -- Bralon Addison and Arik Armstead -- at the end of the recruiting cycle. So far this year, the Ducks have a small but talented recruiting class. If the latest rumblings and recent history are any indication, the Ducks seem to be in prime position to make a late push up the class rankings.

The biggest news of the recruiting weekend is that one of USC's top recruits -- Max Redfield of Mission Viejo (Calif.) High School -- chose to open up his recruitment. Redfield decommitted on Sunday after a couple weeks of speculation that he would do so after a strong visit to Notre Dame last month.

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