Oregon Ducks: Cal Bears

Pac-12 lunch links

June, 11, 2014
Jun 11
2:30
PM ET
Mars ain't the kind of place to raise your kids.

Pac-12 lunch links

June, 9, 2014
Jun 9
2:30
PM ET
Every stop is neatly planned for a poet and a one-man band.

Pac-12's lunch links

June, 5, 2014
Jun 5
2:30
PM ET
And the piano sounds like a carnival. And the microphone smells like a beer.
Over the last two weeks we’ve been taking a look at some players who had big springs for their respective teams. Some are upperclassmen finally coming into their own, some are younger guys taking advantage of open spots on the depth chart, while others are leap frogging some older players and making a name for themselves. Regardless, there were plenty of impressive performances in the Pac-12 this spring. All of these players are going to play a big part for their teams this fall, but which player do you think will be the most crucial to his team’s success in 2014? Rank them 1-12 here.

Here’s a breakdown of the players we’ve profiled over the past two weeks:

Arizona: WR Cayleb Jones -- The Wildcats might have the deepest wide receiver group in the entire conference, but could a Texas transfer become the most important one of the bunch? With a year spent studying the offense and learning from the sideline, Jones could be a major factor.

Arizona State: LB D.J. Calhoun -- The early enrollee ended the spring listed as a starter with Antonio Longino at the weakside linebacker position. With the Sun Devils trying to replace three starting linebackers, could Calhoun become a significant contributor as a true freshman? Seems likely.

Cal: RB Daniel Lasco -- Lasco found himself taking some extra reps this spring as Khalfani Muhammad (last season’s leading rusher) split time between the Cal track and football teams this spring. During his career he has been slowed by injury, but now that he’s finally healthy and taking more reps, could he battle Muhammad for the lead spot this fall?

Colorado: WR Bryce Bobo -- Colorado fans should feel encouraged by Bobo’s spring game performance (five catches, 132 yards) as they head into the summer wondering who can replace Paul Richardson's yardage. It’s highly unlikely that it’ll be one single player, but could Bobo carry a large part of it?

Oregon: WR Devon Allen -- When he wasn’t running for the Oregon track team this spring he was running circles around some Ducks defensive backs. The redshirt freshman could prove to be a huge player for Oregon as they look to replace last season’s top-three receivers as well as injured Bralon Addison’s production.

Oregon State: WR Victor Bolden -- Could Bolden be a possible replacement for some of the yardage lost by Biletnikoff Award winner Brandin Cooks? He has seen most of his time on special teams, but could step up as a big contributor in the fall as QB Sean Mannion looks to have another very big season for the Beavers.

Stanford: DL Aziz Shittu -- The sophomore, who can play every spot on the defensive line for the Cardinal, has received high praise this spring. Coach David Shaw said Shittu was, “probably the player of spring for us.” If it’s good enough for Shaw, is that good enough for you?

[+] EnlargeNelson Agholor
Gary A. Vasquez/USA TODAY SportsHow will USC wideout Nelson Agholor follow up his stellar 2013 season and excellent spring?
UCLA: CB Fabian Moreau -- He was a big contributor to the Bruins last season but during this spring season Moreau became a better leader for UCLA. Coach Jim Mora has given Moreau high praise and if the Bruins are able to take the South Division title next season, a bit part could be because of the breakout year Moreau could have.

USC: WR Nelson Agholor -- Chances are if you’re a USC fan, you know who Agholor is. If you’re not -- then he was the guy who played opposite Marqise Lee. But this spring Agholor took the steps to go from good WR to great WR, and next fall, the fruits of his labor could be on display for the entire conference to see.

Utah: RB Devontae Booker -- Booker is right on the heels of RB Bubba Poole, as displayed by his spring game performance (2 touchdowns, 19 carries, 103 yards). But between Booker, Poole and Troy McCormick, the Utes could have a three-headed monster at running back that Pac-12 teams would not enjoy having to face.

Washington: LB/RB Shaq Thompson -- He was the second-leading tackler for the Huskies last season so it wasn’t a defensive breakout spring for him. But considering he started getting offensive reps, it was a breakout spring for him as a running back. UW needs to replace Bishop Sankey’s yardage, could Thompson’s spring give him a jump start to do so?

Washington State: WR Vince Mayle -- The converted running back had a big spring for the Cougars. This spring Mayle got close to becoming quarterback Connor Halliday’s safety net. Considering Halliday threw for more than 4,500 yards last season, being his safety net would mean major, major yardage next fall.
And I would walk 500 miles and I would walk 500 more.

Pac-12 lunch links

May, 20, 2014
May 20
2:30
PM ET
Sail on silver girl. Sail on by. Your time has come to shine. All your dreams are on their way. See how they shine.
The 2014 NFL draft has come and gone and taken some of the best Pac-12 players with it. But, there is still a lot -- A LOT -- of talent left in the league for the 2014 season, including several underclassmen who finished in the top 10 in different statistical categories last season.

Here’s a breakdown of the top returners in the Pac-12:

[+] EnlargeHawaii Bowl
AP Photo/Eugene TannerSean Mannion leads a group of returning Pac-12 QBs that is the envy of the nation.
PASSING YARDS PER GAME
1. Sean Mannion, Oregon State, 358.6 yards per game (1st in Pac-12 in 2013)
2. Connor Halliday, Washington State, 353.6 yards per game (2nd)
3. Jared Goff, Cal, 292.3 yards per game (3rd)
4. Marcus Mariota, Oregon, 281.9 yards per game (4th)
5. Taylor Kelly, Arizona State, 259.6 yards per game (5th)
6. Brett Hundley, UCLA, 236.2 yards per game (7th)
7. Cody Kessler, USC, 212.0 yards per game (8th)
8. Travis Wilson, Utah, 203.0 yards per game (9th)

  • Of note: We keep talking about how strong the Pac-12 quarterbacks will be next season, but the fact eight of the top-10 passers from last season will be back in 2014 is a bit ridiculous. Last season, the SEC didn’t have anyone who averaged more than 350 yards per game. Its only player who averaged more than 300 yards per game (Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel, 316.5 yards per game) is gone. The Big 12 had one player average more than 300 yards per game (Baylor’s Bryce Petty), and he’s back for 2014. But between the ACC and Big Ten quarterbacks, there wasn’t a single one that even averaged more than 300 passing yards per game.
RUSHING YARDS PER GAME:
1. Byron Marshall, Oregon, 86.5 yards per game (5th)
2. Tre Madden, USC, 63.9 yards per game (7th)
3. Michael Adkins II, Colorado, 59.4 yards per game (8th)
4. Thomas Tyner, Oregon, 59.2 yards per game (9th)
5. Brett Hundley, UCLA, 57.5 yards per game (10th)

  • Of note: The top two rushers last season were both underclassmen who declared early for the NFL draft (Arizona’s Ka’Deem Carey and Washington’s Bishop Sankey). The third- and fourth-ranked rushers were both seniors. This is a rare category where two players from the same school are both in the current top five and last season’s top 10. However, it’ll be interesting to watch the position battle between Marshall and Tyner to see which finishes this season as the Ducks’ top rusher, and that player could likely be at the top of this list come season’s end.
RECEIVING YARDS PER GAME:
1. Dres Anderson, Utah, 83.5 yards per game (4th)
2. Jaelen Strong, Arizona State, 80.1 yards per game (5th)
3. Chris Harper, Cal, 77.5 yards per game (6th)
4. Bralon Addison*, Oregon, 68.5 yards per game (8th)
5. Ty Montgomery, Stanford, 68.4 yards per game (9th)
6. Nelson Agholor, USC, 65.5 yards per game (10th)

  • Of note: For as strong as the conference is in returning QBs, there are a lot of notable receivers not on the list. The top three receivers in the league are gone, and even though Mannion and Halliday averaged more than 350 passing yards per game last season, they don’t have a single returning receiver in the top 10. The conference doesn’t have a returning receiver who averaged more than 100 yards per game in 2013.
[+] EnlargeAddison Gilliam
AP Photo/David ZalubowskiFreshman Colorado linebacker Addison Gillam (44) led the conference in tackles per game in 2013.
TACKLES PER GAME:
1. Addison Gillam, Colorado, 8.9 per game (1st)
2. Eric Kendricks, UCLA, 8.8 per game (3rd)
3. Jason Whittingham, Utah, 8.1 per game (6th)
4. Derrick Malone, Oregon, 8.1 per game (7th)
5. Tyrequek Zimmerman, Oregon State, 8.0 (T-8th)

  • Of note: Gillam, who was a freshman last season, joins Mannion in the select group of individuals who led in a statistical category in 2013 and is back for 2014. In this group, Zimmerman is the only non-linebacker.
INTERCEPTIONS:
1. Steven Nelson, Oregon State, 6 (T-1st)
2. Marcus Peters, Washington, 5 (T-5th)
3. Greg Henderson, Colorado, 4 (T-9th)
4. Tra'Mayne Bondurant, Arizona, 4 (T-9th)

  • Of note: Quarterbacks, feel free to sling it. With only a handful of defensive threats deep, some signal-callers are going to feel much more confident sending a ball down field.
SACKS (TOTAL):
1. Hau'oli Kikaha, Washington, 13 (2nd)
2. Jacoby Hale*, Utah, 6.5 (4th)
3. Tony Washington, Oregon, 7.5 (T-9th)

  • Of note: We’ve talked a lot this offseason, and even in this story, about how good the quarterbacks are going to be this season. Well, here’s one more reason why they’ll be so good -- so few pass rushers return. Two (maybe three) of the top 10 from last season are back. Kikaha, who was second in the Pac-12 last season to Stanford’s Trent Murphy, will be the likely frontrunner for sacks leader in 2014 and he’ll have the opportunity to go up against some of the best QBs in the league -- of the eight returning top-10 quarterbacks, the Huskies will face six.

* Denotes a player who suffered a severe injury that could keep him out of the 2014 season

Pac-12's lunch links

May, 19, 2014
May 19
2:30
PM ET
The dream of the '90s is alive in Portland. The dream of the '90s is alive in Portland. The tattoo ink never runs dry.
And so we will have a Pac-12 championship game at a neutral site.

Levi’s Stadium is going to give fans a new experience for the Pac-12 championship game and the opportunity to travel to a city that wouldn’t have been on their travel list before. The stadium itself is in Santa Clara, Calif. -- about one hour outside of San Francisco and 10 minutes from the San Jose (Calif.) International Airport.

SportsNation

If the championship game were to become a rotating-site event, where would you most like to see it hosted next?

  •  
    38%
  •  
    11%
  •  
    28%
  •  
    23%

Discuss (Total votes: 4,804)

But this got the Pac-12 blog thinking. If league commissioner Larry Scott ever decided that it would be a rotating neutral site for every season’s championship, where would you most like to see the game?

So we racked our brains and came up with three other stadiums. These three stadiums all fit a criterion, which we established. First, it must be a neutral site. As much as we love the view at Husky Stadium or the feel of the Rose Bowl, neutral means neutral and since we can’t go to Switzerland, our options became a bit more limited.

Second, it would need to be a sizable stadium with the growing interest in the Pac-12 conference, so we looked in the 65,000-plus seating level. And third, it needs to be in a favorable city. A championship game is going to bring an influx of football fans and those fans need food, drink and entertainment.

Thus, we came up with three fantastic options that span the entire west coast and give an array of options for football fans.

1. CenturyLink Field, Seattle. Though the obvious headliner for this stadium is the Backstreet Boys’ reunion tour (May 22, tickets still available), this would be an excellent choice for the Pac-12 championship game. The stadium seats 67,000 but can be expanded to 72,000 for special events. The field is fantastic and is the home of the Seattle Seahawks and the Seattle Sounders FC. The city of Seattle is a gem. Where else can you visit the original Starbucks, the Space Needle, Pike Place Market and go for an underground city tour all in one day? The main deterrent would be the weather. The average low in Seattle in December is 36 degrees and the average high is 47. So if fans are looking for a tropical getaway (and the Seattle Aquarium just isn’t going to do it for you), then this wouldn’t be the best place. But for a fan who wants good football, a great stadium and fantastic food and drink, this could be a very viable option.

2. Sports Authority Field at Mile High, Denver. Again, a great city, a great venue and another great option for the Pac-12 championship game. Like Seattle, it is a city that wouldn’t feature a tropical climate in early December (Average high: 43, average low: 17), but haven’t you ever watched the fans at Lambeau Field and wondered what it was like to bundle up and watch a game? (No? OK, fine.) But imagine the satisfaction you could get walking into the stadium and shouting, “Omaha! Omaha!” Similar to Seattle, it’s an easily accessible city and one that people would have no problem spending a few days in. Between the live music, the Denver Art Museum and food options, you can’t go wrong. And if you have a free day before the big game, head out to the mountains and get in a day of skiing or snowboarding.

3. Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego. All right, so here’s an option that would bring fans to a location where they wouldn’t have to worry about packing a parka. In December, temperatures range between 48 and 65 degrees, on average. So for those who would gripe about the Pac-12 North teams having such a huge advantage if the game were to be played in Seattle or Denver, this might be the best option for you. The stadium seats just over 70,000 and has 19,000 parking spots on site (the most of these three options). And who doesn’t want to visit San Diego? Between the opportunity to quote Anchorman, a trip to the world-famous San Diego Zoo or the USS Midway Museum, there’s plenty to see and do.

Pac-12 recruiting roundup

May, 15, 2014
May 15
5:30
PM ET
With spring football done and the Pac-12 coaches hitting the recruiting trail, we figured it was time to check in on how each team is faring with its recruits.

Here's a look at where each school stands:


Arizona

2015 commits: 6
Players: Keenan Walker, OT, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Taren Morrison, RB, Mesa, Ariz.; Darick Holmes Jr., RB, Westlake Village, Calif.; Finton Connolly, DT, Gilbert, Ariz.; Alex Kosinski, OG, Larkspur, Calif.; Ricky McCoy, TE, Fresno, Calif.

2016 commits: 2
Players: Trevor Speights, RB, McAllen, Texas; Shea Patterson, QB, Shreveport, La.



Arizona State

2015 commits: 6
Players: Brady White, QB, Newhall, Calif.; Morie Evans, ATH, Huntsville, Texas; Bryce Perkins, QB, Chandler, Ariz.; Nick Ralston, RB, Argyle, Texas; Tony Nicholson, ATH, Grand Prairie, Texas; Raymond Epps, TE (JC), Yuma, Ariz.

2017 commit: 1
Player: Loren Mondy, DE, Mansfield, Texas


Cal

2015 commits: 4
Players: Austin Aaron, WR, Napa, Calif.; Greyson Bankhead, WR, Corona, Calif.; Malik Psalms, CB, Chino Hills, Calif.; Lonny Powell, RB, Sacramento, Calif.


Colorado


2015 commits: 3
Players: T.J. Fehoko, DE, Salt Lake City; N.J. Falo, OLB, Sacramento; Dillon Middlemiss, OG, Arvada, Colo.


Oregon

2015 commits: 4
Players: Taj Griffin, RB, Powder Springs, Ga.; Zach Okun, OG, Newbury Park, Calif.; Jake Breeland, WR, Mission Viejo, Calif.; Shane Lemieux, OT, Yakima, Wash.


Oregon State

2015 commits: 3
Players: Tyrin Ferguson, OLB, New Orleans; Kyle Haley, OLB, Anaheim, Calif.; Treshon Broughton, CB (JC), Tustin, Calif.


Stanford

2015 commits: 3
Players: Arrington Farrar, S, College Park, Ga.; Christian Folau, ILB, Salt Lake City; Rex Manu, DT, Mililani, Hawaii


UCLA

2015 commits: 7
Players: Josh Rosen, QB, Bellflower, Calif.; Alize Jones, TE, Las Vegas; Tevita Halalilo, OG, Moreno Valley, Calif.; L.J. Reed, WR, Elk Grove, Calif.; Jaason Lewis, ATH, Virginia Beach, Va.; Bolu Olorunfunmi, RB, Clovis, Calif.; Victor Alexander, ILB, Jacksonville, Fla.


USC

2015 commits: 5
Players: Chuma Edoga, OT, Powder Springs, Ga.; Ricky Town, QB, Ventura, Calif.; David Sills, QB, Elkton, Md.; Taeon Mason, CB, Pasadena, Calif.; Roy Hemsley, OT, Los Angeles


Utah

2015 commits: 7
Players: Jake Grant, OT, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Tuli Wily-Matagi, ATH, Kahuku, Hawaii; Donzale Roddie, WR, Paramount, Calif.; Chayden Johnson, K, South Jordan, Utah; Brandon Snell, WR (JC), Miami; Corey Butler, WR (JC), Wilmington, Calif.; Zach Lindsay, OT (JC), Kaysville, Utah


Washington

2015 commits: 3
Players: Jake Browning, QB, Folsom, Calif.; Trey Adams, OT, Wenatchee, Wash.; Myles Gaskin, RB, Seattle

2017 commit: 1
Player: Tathan Martell, QB, Poway, Calif.


Washington State

2015 commits: 5
Players: Thomas Toki, DT, Mountain View, Calif.; Austin Joyner, RB, Marysville, Wash.; Tyler Hilinski, QB, Upland, Calif.; Kameron Powell, S, Upland, Calif.; James Williams, RB, Burbank, Calif.
Picture yourself in a boat on a river with tangerine trees and marmalade skies. Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly. A girl with kaleidoscope eyes. Cellophane flowers of yellow and green towering over your head.
ESPN’s Todd McShay released his Way-too-early 2015 mock draft on Wednesday, giving a very early look into the future of some potential NFL draftees next season. Once again, the SEC leads the way, putting 10 players in the first 32 picks of McShay's first mock draft.

McShay predicts the No. 1 draft pick being a defensive lineman just like the 2014 draft. Only, instead of coming out of the SEC, he believes that defensive lineman will be one out of the Pac-12, USC's Leonard Williams.

McShay put eight Pac-12 players in the first round, including three top-10 picks. The ACC is behind the Pac-12 with seven picks, though six of those are from Florida State. The Big Ten has four players on the list while the Big 12 landed three.

Oregon leads the way for the Pac-12 with three players in the top 20 picks -- cornerback Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, quarterback Marcus Mariota and center Hroniss Grasu. USC got on the board with two players in the top 32 while UCLA, Stanford and Arizona State each had one player.
The NCAA released its annual Academic Progress Rate (APR) on Wednesday.

In order to compete in championships during the 2014-15 season, teams need to earn a 930 average over the previous four years or a 940 average over the previous two years.

Stanford is the Pac-12's headliner. Last year they led the conference with a rating of 978. This year, they lead with an increased APR of 978. The two schools to make the biggest jumps in their multiyear rates were UCLA and Washington, which both increased their APRs by 13.

Ten Pac-12 football programs reported an improvement. The two teams that didn’t show improvement were Oregon State and USC. However, all of the Pac-12 teams will be eligible to compete in this year’s championships. Across the country, 12 teams were penalized, 10 of which were given postseason bans.

Here’s the ranking of the Pac-12 APR with last year’s multi-year rate in parenthesis:

Stanford: 984 (978)
UCLA: 979 (966)
Utah: 970 (963)
Washington: 967 (954)
Arizona: 960 (956)
Oregon: 958 (951)
Colorado: 955 (946)
Oregon State: 950 (957)
Washington State: 944 (942)
Arizona State: 941 (937)
USC: 941 (945)
Cal: 938 (935)

To search APRs by school, sport, etc. click here.
Now, Watergate does not bother me. Does your conscience bother you? Tell the truth.
Let's get rich and buy our parents homes in the south of France. Let's get rich and give everybody nice sweaters and teach them how to dance. Let's get rich and build a house on a mountain making everybody look like ants.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Reaction To New AP Top 25 Poll
College football reporter Adam Rittenberg reacts to the latest AP Top 25 poll, which includes East Carolina for the first time since 2008 and Mississippi State for the first time in two seasons after it broke a losing streak against LSU.
VIDEO PLAYLIST video