Oklahoma Sooners: Trey Metoyer

Big 12's lunch links

February, 13, 2014
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Don't just talk about it, LeBron. Be about it.

Grading the class: 2011

February, 5, 2014
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Oklahoma is poised to add several recruits into the fold on Wednesday with an eye on creating the foundation of a future championship squad. Yet, recruiting is an inexact science as some projected stars rise to meet those high expectations while others struggle to make a difference in the Big 12. Thus, it’s the perfect time to look back at OU’s past five recruiting classes. On Wednesday, we begin with a review of the Class of 2011 including recruits who exceeded expectations, recruits who were solid signees and ones who were complete busts.

There was a lot of hope for this class when these players signed in February 2011, but the class as a whole has let down the Sooners. The class was ranked No. 11 nationally by ESPN.com.

Transcendent figures

Linebacker Franklin Shannon: The No. 48 safety in the nation, Shannon made an immediate impact after a redshirt season. He forced his way onto the field as a redshirt freshman in 2012 and led OU in tackles as a sophomore in 2013. Shannon started in 15 games in his first two seasons and has 132 tackles, including 10.5 tackles for loss, heading into his junior year.

Bull's-eye

[+] EnlargeOklahoma
Jackson Laizure/Getty ImagesDefensive tackle Jordan Phillips is one of the few players who has panned out from Oklahoma's 2011 recruiting class.
Defensive tackle Jordan Phillips: Phillips was emerging as a major force in the middle of the Sooners defense before a back injury this season. The No. 119 player in the ESPN 150 in 2011, Phillips has the talent to exceed expectations if he returns to full health.

Defensive tackle Jordan Wade: He replaced the other Jordan after a grayshirt season, and then redshirted in 2012. As a redshirt freshman in 2013, Wade was one of the heroes of OU’s 11-win season as he stepped in for Phillips and held his own in the middle of OU’s defense. The No. 103 player in the ESPN 150, Wade has a bright future ahead of him.

Completely missed the mark

Offensive lineman Nathan Hughes: The No. 101 player in the ESPN 150, Hughes played several positions before leaving the program before the 2013 season.

Running back Brandon Williams: The No. 35 player in the ESPN 150, Williams made an impact as a freshman but elected to transfer to Texas A&M after his first season.

Running back Danzel Williams: The No. 64 player in the ESPN 150, Williams redshirted in 2011, then left the program before the 2013 season. He never made an impact for the Sooners.

Overall grade: D-

More than half of this class is no longer in the program, including both Williams, Hughes, receiver Trey Metoyer, receiver Kameel Jackson, quarterback Kendal Thompson, linebacker Kellen Jones and defensive back Bennett Okotcha. Only Shannon and a pair of Jordans kept this class from being an F in one of the worst classes of the Bob Stoops era.

Big 12 lunchtime links

October, 16, 2013
10/16/13
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You're welcome, Mexico.
  • The Cyclones are looking for a way to utilize RB Aaron Wimberly while also keeping him healthy, according to the Ames Tribune's Bobby La Gesse. Iowa State is the last squad to hold Baylor under 30 points, the Des Moines Register's Tommy Birch points out.
  • Former Baylor QB Robert Griffin III is the seventh-most liked player in the NFL, according to Forbes; ex-Oklahoma RB Adrian Peterson is second. Also, here's the block that got Baylor WR Corey Coleman suspended for a half.
  • Texas Tech QB Baker Mayfield returned to practice Tuesday, reports the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal's Don Williams. The Red Raiders are looking hard at their special teams after a poor showing last weekend against Iowa State.
  • The pupil is about to face his mentor in Morgantown, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review's Bob Hertzel writes. Former West Virginia coach Rich Rodriguez revealed some regrets, reports Mitch Vingle of the Charleston Gazette
  • A win this weekend in Stillwater could bring some sizzle back to TCU’s season, writes the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Stefan Stevenson. Nothing seems to be going right for the Horned Frogs this season, including the tires on the team bus. The Frogs are actually going to practice at OU the night before heading to Oklahoma State.
  • Charlie Weis' offensive shakeup is a positive step, in the opinion of the Lawrence Journal-World's Tom Keegan.
  • Bill Snyder is seeing progress in Manhattan, reports the Topeka Capital-Journal's Ken Corbitt.
  • After Oklahoma WR Trey Metoyer was charged with two counts of indecent exposure, coach Bob Stoops indicated the former blue-chip recruit would not be returning to the team. QB Blake Bell is under the gun, says The Oklahoman's Ryan Aber.
  • Despite his struggles, Oklahoma State is concerned about TCU QB Trevone Boykin, writes The Oklahoman's Gina Mizell. The Cowboys linebackers have developed chemistry, in the eyes of Jimmie Tramel of the Tulsa World.
  • Texas has appointed a seven-member advisory committee to search for an athletic director to replace the retiring DeLoss Dodds.

Hopes, concerns after OU's 34-0 win

September, 2, 2013
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NORMAN, Okla.--The Sooners got their season off to a terrific start with a 34-0 win over Louisiana-Monroe on Saturday. Oklahoma earned its first defensive shutout since 2010 and redshirt freshman quarterback Trevor Knight showed he can make defenses pay with his legs.

After a quick review of the game, here are three reasons for hope and two reasons for concern as the Sooners look toward West Virginia on Saturday.

Hopes

Linebacker Corey Nelson’s defensive stop on second-and-3 in the first quarter

The Sooners’ defense will be much improved if Nelson consistently performs like he did on this play. ULM quarterback Kolton Browning kept the ball after seeing OU linebacker Eric Striker about to tackle his running back. Browning followed his guard into the hole. Nelson saw the entire play unfolding, slipped underneath the blocker and stopped Browning for a two-yard loss. If Nelson can consistently slip past blockers in the running game like he did on this play, the Sooners are sure to improve on their 5.15 yards per carry allowed average from 2012.

Defensive end Charles Tapper’s quarterback hurry in the second quarter

With ULM facing a third-and-9, OU did a terrific job disguising its blitz which resulted in Tapper going unblocked and hammering Browning as he tried to release the ball. Before the snap, linebacker Frank Shannon was on the line of scrimmage poised to blitz while nickelback Julian Wilson was lined up over the closest slot receiver on the wide side and linebacker Nelson was lined up on the slot receiver on the short side of ULM’s five-receiver formation. After the snap, Wilson and Nelson were blitzing, Shannon was dropping back to pick up one slot receiver, safety Gabe Lynn had dropped down to pick up the other slot receiver and Tapper was cruising untouched toward the quarterback as ULM’s tackle slid inside to pick up Wilson’s blitz.

The Sooners only sent five pass rushers against five ULM blockers yet Tapper went unblocked due to the confusion created by Mike Stoops’ plan. It’s a good example of the versatility and aggressiveness Stoops hopes to play with in 2013.

[+] EnlargeTrey Metoyer
Mark D. Smith/USA TODAY SportsOklahoma receiver Lacoltan Bester (11) celebrates with Trey Metoyer after Metoyer's TD catch.
Trey Metoyer’s 13-yard third-quarter touchdown

This play brings hope for multiple reasons. First, it showed what Knight can do once he gets comfortable and into a rhythm during the game. It was a good read to recognize Metoyer was open (thanks to a terrific job by the Sooners’ offensive line) and a perfectly thrown pass kept the defender from doing anything about the touchdown. Had it been underthrown at all, the defender was in position to knock it down. It’s easy to look at Knight’s numbers (11 of 28 for 86 yards) and assume he can’t throw, but this play should make you think twice before jumping to conclusions. Any struggles the Sooners’ passing game has with Knight at the helm won’t be rooted in any physical limitations.

Secondly, the play should give Metoyer, who has the physical tools to be a game-changing receiver, confidence after a rough freshman season. Now the sophomore could have a sense that he is in the midst of a fresh start after high expectations and a disappointing first year in Norman. If Metoyer plays up to his ability, the Sooners’ offense could go to another level.

Bonus reason for hope

Running back Roy Finch was on the field. On offense. Enough said.

Concerns

Lacoltan Bester’s 7-yard reception on 3rd-and-8 in the first quarter

The Sooners’ senior receiver ran a 7-yard route with his team needing eight yards to move the chains. That’s never a good thing. True enough, the route was designed to get Bester the ball on the move as he flashes across the middle of the defense to give Knight an easy dump-down option. But Bester went behind the ULM linebacker, instead of in front of him, adding additional depth to his route anyway. Why not go a yard deeper to move the chains? It wouldn’t have made Knight’s throw any more difficult. A little better field awareness and OU moves the chains on that play and Knight gets some early confidence. Little things like that can turn into big things against Big 12 teams, which could result in a loss.

Near interception late in the second half

Under a minute remained until halftime on 3rd-and-9 at the ULM 16-yard line. Knight almost threw an red-zone interception which would have cost the Sooners’ three points. Before the snap, early in the play clock, it appeared Knight had Jaz Reynolds in single coverage on the short side of the field, so it’s easy to see why Knight thought the Sooners had the advantage. However, one or two seconds before the snap, ULM backed out into zone coverage. Knight threw the ball anyway. ULM defensive back Cordero Smith dropped the potential interception in the end zone as Reynolds tried to split double coverage. Knight's mistake is just part of being a young quarterback and should be a great learning experience for the redshirt freshman.
NORMAN, Okla. -- For the first time in three seasons, Landry Jones won't take the first snap of the season for the Oklahoma Sooners. The veteran signal caller has moved on to the NFL and will be replaced by the winner of the quarterback competition between Blake Bell and Trevor Knight.

Whoever wins the job will have plenty of talent around him and should be protected by a veteran group of offensive linemen. Yet plenty of potential concerns still remain. Here is a look at three reasons for hope for the Sooners' offense and three reasons to be concerned.

Hope

[+] EnlargeGabe Ikard
Cal Sport Media via AP ImagesSenior Gabe Ikard, with 37 career starts, anchors an experienced offensive line for the Sooners.
Veteran offensive line: The Sooners' offensive line, led by ESPN.com preseason All-American Gabe Ikard, is a great place to start as offensive coordinator Josh Heupel looks to build his offense. Even with the loss of top-five NFL draft pick Lane Johnson, OU returns five players who have combined to start 85 career games, including Ikard's 37 starts. And the kicker is, Ikard and right tackle Daryl Williams might be the only guys considered locks to start, given the added depth the Sooners brought in with junior college transfers Josiah St. John, Tony Feo and Dionte Savage, along with superb sophomore center Ty Darlington.

New offensive approach: Whoever wins the quarterback job will bring a running aspect to the quarterback position that was never a factor with Jones under center. There will be times this season when receivers are covered and the Sooners' quarterback will make the defense pay with his feet. It brings an added element to the offense that Big 12 defenses will have to prepare for and should mean additional big-play opportunities for the Sooners' skill players.

Depth at the skill positions: OU will enter the season with a veteran group of playmaking running backs alongside youthful talent at the position, one of the Big 12's most explosive, and a group of talented, yet somewhat inexperienced, receivers. Running backs Damien Williams and Brennan Clay should be one of the league's top running duos, and Jalen Saunders proved he can make game-altering plays in 2012.

Concern

[+] EnlargeBlake Bell
AP Photo/Alonzo AdamsA key weapon as the "Bell Dozer," Blake Bell has not been tested as an every down quarterback.
Inexperienced quarterback: Bell has thrown 20 career passes during his first two seasons in Norman, and Knight has zero career pass attempts. Even though Bell has had plenty of success as the “Bell Dozer” in OU's short-yardage packages, nobody knows how he or Knight will respond when counted on regularly to make plays and protect the football. The Sooners' coaches are looking for a playmaker who will limit mistakes. What if neither player can prove they can make big plays without making big mistakes?

Unknowns at receiver: There is a bunch at talent at receiver but limited experience. Inside receivers Saunders and Sterling Shepard are proven playmakers, but OU needs playmaking at outside receiver as well. Trey Metoyer might be the most talented candidate but needs to mature into a consistent producer. Durron Neal has ability, and Lacoltan Bester is one of the most competitive receivers on the roster. OU has receivers with the potential to produce, but that means nothing until they actually make plays on Saturdays.

Inability to run the ball when needed: The Sooners averaged 4.83 yards per carry in 2012 yet struggled to run the football at key times. According to ESPN Stats and Info, OU averaged 2.65 yards per rush against teams that won 70 percent of their games last season (losses to Kansas State, Notre Dame and Texas A&M). OU is looking to regain the toughness and ability to run the football whenever they want that propelled the Sooners into the BCS title hunt in recent years. For example, the Sooners averaged 3.94 yards per carry against teams that won 70 percent of their games during the 2008 season, the year of OU's last BCS title game appearance.
It’s midway through Oklahoma’s preseason camp, so there’s no better time to update the position battles that could define the Sooners season.

[+] EnlargeBlake Bell
Alonzo Adams/USA TODAY SportsBlake Bell remains favored to start at quarterback for the Sooners, but the competition is far from over.
Quarterback: Blake Bell remains the favorite to start the season opener, but the quarterback competition rages on in Norman. Bell continues to work on playing mistake-free football, while redshirt freshman Trevor Knight has been impressive in the preseason even though he hasn’t knocked Bell out of his favorite status. The Sooners’ coaching staff has been diligent about keeping the competition open, and nobody has stepped up and won the job at this point. This competition could continue into the season, particularly with Kendal Thompson set to return early in the year.

Left tackle: Quite frankly it appears this was more of a competition last August than it is this August. Tyrus Thompson is the clear favorite to replace Lane Johnson after battling Johnson to start at left tackle during last year’s preseason camp. Thompson brings versatility and immense talent to the table, making him difficult to supplant. Derek Farniok and Josiah St. John are in the mix at the position and are looking to join the Sooners’ tackle rotation alongside Thompson and starting right tackle Daryl Williams.

Safety: The coaches really like Gabe Lynn's veteran presence at safety and have Quentin Hayes, another player with at least three years on campus, at the other safety spot. But both players will have to hold off a strong push from true freshmen Hatari Byrd and Ahmad Thomas. The duo arrived on campus with college-ready bodies and undoubtedly will see the field as freshman. Don’t be surprised if one or both show up in the starting lineup at some point this season.

Defensive end: With Chuka Ndulue moving to defensive tackle, OU is looking to replace both defensive ends. Geneo Grissom started the Cotton Bowl and appears solid at one defensive end slot. At the other position, Charles Tapper has been running with the starters but will have to hold off a strong push from other talented youngsters, including true freshman Ogbonnia Okoronkwo, who is drawing rave reviews for his pass-rushing skills.

Receiver: Jalen Saunders and Sterling Shepard are locked in as playmakers for the Sooners' offense. Both players can be difference makers with the ball in their hands and should get the majority of the snaps at inside receiver. On the outside, Lacoltan Bester is making a strong push this preseason to be in the starting lineup in the opener. Trey Metoyer could be the most talented of the bunch, and Durron Neal displayed playmaking ability in the spring game. Even though Neal and Metoyer have more fanfare, Bester is setting himself up to see plenty of playing time as a senior.

Ranking Oklahoma's position groups 

August, 12, 2013
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Damien WilliamsAP Photo/Cal Sport MediaSenior Damien Williams is one of a deep stable of Oklahoma running backs that are capable of making an impact for the Sooners this season.
It's an unusual role for Bob Stoops' program as Oklahoma prepares for 2013 season with minimal expectations to insert itself into the BCS title hunt. The Sooners have several talented, deep position groups and other position groups full of uncertainty. Here's a look at OU's position groups ranked from strongest to weakest.

NORMAN, Okla. -- The ball floated toward the two competitors as they both battled for position to pluck it out of the air. Seconds later, Oklahoma receiver Trey Metoyer leaped over his teammate to pluck the ball from the sky with ease. It was a spectacular play during Metoyer’s first spring game in Norman and one of the reasons he entered the 2012 season with plenty of preseason accolades.

In his first official game in a Sooners’ uniform, Metoyer was in a similar situation and, again, outfought the defender to make the catch in the 2012 season opener against UTEP. But the would-be reception went down as an incompletion instead as Metoyer was out-of-bounds when he made the catch after not running his route with the precision required along the sidelines.

[+] EnlargeTrey Metoyer
Richard Rowe/US PresswireSophomore wideout Trey Metoyer, who caught just 17 passes last season, could have a much bigger impact for the Sooners in 2013.
These are two drastically different examples of Metoyer’s journey.

In his first 18 months at OU, the sophomore receiver starred during the spring of 2012, struggled during his true freshman season and heads into this season looking to help replace Kenny Stills and Justin Brown in OU’s lineup.

“Success wasn’t coming to him the way he wanted,” receivers coach Jay Norvell said. “He was frustrated. He’s used to playing well at a really high level. When you walk in that door [at OU], you better come in here expecting to come and play, or you’re not really at the right place. That’s the kind of mentality he had walking in the door and when he didn’t have that kind of success, it was frustrating."

Metoyer entered the 2012 season as the Big 12’s preseason newcomer of the year and started his first four games in crimson and cream. Then, after Fresno State transfer Jalen Saunders was cleared to play before the Texas game, Metoyer tumbled down the depth chart, finishing with just 17 receptions for 148 yards and a touchdown. Ten of those catches came before Saunders’ was cleared in mid-October.

Yet, Saunders and Metoyer have become close friends, even spending time after practice during the spring to hone their skills. Saunders, a senior, has made a point to take the youngster under his wing.

“Last fall he was starting then kind of faded away from the offense,” Saunders said. “It hurt him a little bit because he was expecting a lot of things. He was taking himself out of the picture because he had high expectations and was feeling bad about himself. This spring me and him sat down and talked a lot, I kind of took him under my wing like a younger brother. I treat him like my younger brother because I want him to be the best out there.”

Heading into his second season in Norman, Metoyer is battling fellow sophomore Durron Neal, senior Lacoltan Bester and others to earn a starting spot at outside receiver for the Sooners. Metoyer's talent is readily apparent and his consistency is slowly starting to come to the forefront.

“I think it’s coming together for Trey,” Norvell said. “I think he understands our offense, I think he has been around our players and quarterbacks. He is getting to the point where he becomes more confident in what he’s doing.”

If Metoyer progresses to the point that Norvell considers him among the Sooners’ most consistent receivers and puts him in the starting lineup, Big 12 defenses might have to take notice.

“He’s going to be one of the best receivers, probably, to ever come through OU,” cornerback Cortez Johnson said. “Trey Metoyer has the best hands on the team, that’s why every play [during practice] I’m trying to go against him, trying to get myself better and get myself reps against an opponent like that.”

As the projected starter at cornerback opposite Aaron Colvin for the Sooners, Johnson should know what Metoyer brings to the table. He has had several one-on-one battles with Metoyer during the spring, summer and early in preseason camp, resulting in his high praise for the Whitehouse, Texas, native.

“He runs good routes, he knows how to get in your cushion, open you up,” Johnson said. “[He] has good footwork, great hands, he’s just a great player. He has a lot to work on still, but he’s going to be pretty good.”
You’ve seen them while prepping your fantasy football team. Or reading ESPN Insider Chad Ford while getting ready for the NBA Draft. The “tier system” is an effective way of making sense, differentiating and analyzing a cluster of players. Everyone from pro sport general managers to college coaches out on the trail recruiting employ this method.

With this is mind, SoonerNation has parsed out Oklahoma’s roster into 10 separate tiers. Here they are:

Tier 1: The Elite (Guys who could play for almost anyone)


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Ranking Oklahoma's position groups 

June, 17, 2013
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The last several days, ESPN Insider Phil Steele has been rolling out the rankings of his top individual position units in the country. In that vein, SoonerNation has ranked OU’s position units for the upcoming season, from best to worst:


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During the summer months, SoonerNation will take a closer look at each player on Oklahoma’s roster in our Crimson Countdown series. Each day, we will analyze each player’s impact on the program since arriving on campus, his potential impact this fall and his long-term impact. Starting with No. 1 Kendal Thompson, the series will follow the roster numerically through our final analysis of No. 99 Chaz Nelson.

No. 17 Trey Metoyer
Receiver, 6-foot-1, 184 pounds, sophomore



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NORMAN, Okla. -- In Bob Stoops’ first season in 1999, Oklahoma spread everyone out and threw it around.

In 2004, the Sooners put Jason White under center and handed off to Adrian Peterson.

As Stoops pointed out last week, the Sooners have often "played to their personnel." That includes last season, when, after it became abundantly clear the Sooners’ fourth-best receiver was better than any tight end, OU went almost exclusively with four-wide formations.

[+] EnlargeTaylor McNamara
J.P. Wilson/Icon SMIThe Sooners need redshirt freshman Taylor McNamara to become a passing-game threat in 2013.
“We had some young [tight ends], a new guy from junior college,” Stoops said. “We weren’t the same with them on the field. Our best grouping was with wide receivers, which was quite obvious to anybody who watched us.”

In recent weeks, the Sooners have taken criticism from ESPN analysts Trent Dilfer and Jon Gruden for not using tight ends. They say it put too much pressure on quarterback Landry Jones to throw the ball downfield.

In several OU victories, Jones’ arm was good enough to overcome the limitations of not having a tight end checking off a route underneath the coverage, streaking down the middle of the field or helping to block in the run game.

But in the Sooners’ three 2012 losses, not having a tight end came back to haunt them, as OU was unable to maintain balance with the run or attack the Kansas State, Notre Dame and Texas A&M defenses off play-action.

The OU coaching staff recognized this liability and tried to lure another junior-college tight end to Norman before signing day. But after losing out on Beau Sandland and Emmanuel Bibbs -- the two juco tight ends they thought could provide an immediate impact -- the Sooners were forced to go with what they have.

Only this time, they won’t have Jones’ arm to fall back on. To be successful in 2013, the Sooners will have to run the ball with better efficiency. And they’ll have to also be lethal with play-action. Which means Sam Grant, Taylor McNamara and Brannon Green, whom the Sooners deemed weren’t ready last year, had better be ready to play this time around.

“I feel much better about it,” Stoops said. “The two freshmen [Grant and McNamara] have come along, are stronger blockers, have a stronger presence about what they’re trying to do. Same thing with Brannon Green, more experience in what we want him to do.

“I believe they’ll have more opportunities.”

Despite losing Kenny Stills and Justin Brown, the Sooners figure to be strong at wideout again. Jalen Saunders and Sterling Shepard should be prolific, and Trey Metoyer, Durron Neal, Dannon Cavil, Jaz Reynolds and others have big-play ability. But as OU transitions to an offense more reliant on the ground game -- as well as the running ability of its inexperienced quarterbacks -- tight end play will be paramount.

It’s no coincidence that when the Sooners have run the ball best, they’ve had stellar tight end play.

Quentin Griffin had Trent Smith.

Chris Brown and DeMarco Murray had Brody Eldridge and Jermaine Gresham.

Even Adrian Peterson had James "Bubba" Moses and Joe Jon Finley.

Stoops says he likes what he saw from the tight ends in the spring. After redshirting last year, Grant showed promise as a blocking specialist. McNamara has put on weight and is finally healthy after undergoing shoulder surgery last season, then tweaking a hamstring after being cleared for spring ball. Green has come along, too.

They’ll never be confused with the 2007 tight end grouping of Gresham, Eldridge and Finley. But if they can be just solid enough to be used, that might be adequate.

The Sooners are always going to play to their personnel. But OU has always been better when the tight ends are included.

Oklahoma 10: Post-spring rankings 

April, 16, 2013
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NORMAN, Okla. -- Following Saturday's spring game, SoonerNation has updated the "Oklahoma 10" -- a composite ranking of the 10 best players on the team. The list:

1. FB Trey Millard (Last ranking: 1): Millard was held out of the spring game as a precaution, something Bob Stoops usually does with his stars. Despite manning an unheralded position, Millard certainly fits the bill of a star. You wouldn’t know it by the number of touches he gets, but Josh Heupel’s new option-oriented offense -- which, like Millard, was kept on the shelf Saturday -- could get the ball in Millard’s hands more often. That’s always good for the Sooners – and bad for opposing defenses.


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Big 12 spring game review: Oklahoma

April, 15, 2013
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For most of these games, we'll do a "What happened" section in addition to "What we learned," but we had SoonerNation on the case, so you can see more about the raw facts here and here.

A few of my observations on what we learned:
  • Unseating Blake Bell looks mighty, mighty difficult. Given how he'd looked as a passer in limited opportunities thus far in his career, there was plenty of reason to doubt how well Bell would handle running the Sooners' entire offense. Still, when you consider how he played and threw in high school, there was equal reason to believe he'd handle it fine. Belief in the latter looks to have paid off. Oklahoma will want his completion percentage to be a lot higher, but he made a whole bunch of plays down the field and over the middle that show plenty of potential. He completed 14 of 23 passes for 213 yards and two touchdowns, but most importantly, he didn't have a turnover. If that means a lower completion percentage, Oklahoma's staff will take that trade all day. On Saturday, though, Bell was what he needed to be: A step ahead of competition Trevor Knight and Kendal Thompson. There's no guarantees yet, and Bob Stoops has never placed a high premium on naming a starter in the spring as opposed to fall camp, but by now, I'd be shocked if Bell doesn't mature into "The Guy" for the Sooners over the summer and leave little doubt in fall camp about whose team it is.
  • The defense has a few interesting new faces. Trey Franks was suspended all last season, but turned a few heads by making seven tackles and breaking up two passes. The former receiver looked solid on the other side of the ball. We'll see how he fits into the rotation at safety for the Sooners. That's a huge position of need, and you'd have a hard time convincing me he couldn't challenge for a starting job in fall camp. D.J. Ward, a hyped, home-grown defensive end recruit, finally got on the field after being cleared by the NCAA, but he didn't record any stats and Saturday was his first practice in pads.
  • Bob Stoops clarified his pay-for-play comments. I wrote about Stoops' controversial comments here, but he added another clarification after Saturday's game, according to The Oklahoman. "I was just asked about paying players to play football, and of course I went off on what they already are paid,” Stoops said. “And I probably was a little -- I didn't mean to be insensitive when I talked about when the dining halls close and we've all been in that situation. We've all been a little bit hungry on a Sunday here and there. … That doesn't mean I'm not concerned about my players and want to best for them." I don't disagree with Stoops there, but what he said doesn't change my point about the possible repercussion on the recruiting trail. It won't be hard for folks to make the case that other coaches are more sympathetic to their players' current situation, whether it's true or not. I agree with Stoops in that introducing how much he makes is irrelevant to the discussion (he argued that in Saturday's clarification), but I'm betting if Stoops had it to do over again, he'd take a pass at the question. No one's asking Stoops to change his answer or his belief. He's entitled to his opinion, and suggesting it's not a valid opinion is silly, but I fail to see the positives for him in speaking out on the issue.
  • Start up the Trey Metoyer hype train one more time. Every now and then, guys make big noise during the spring and don't show up in the fall. That happened to Metoyer last season, but he sounds like a more mature player this spring, and showed up in a big way again on Saturday. Six catches for 122 yards will definitely get people fired up for him to break out in the fall. He's got everything you could ask for physically, he's just got to turn it into production. I sense we'll be hearing "Bell to Metoyer" quite a few times this fall, but only a few less times than "Bell to Shepard." Sterling Shepard had a quiet day with just two grabs for 22 yards, but I loved what he showed last season. The Ryan Broyles comparisons are premature, but he's definitely got flashes of the FBS all-time leader in receptions.

NORMAN, Okla. -- With nothing open from his initial reads, quarterback Blake Bell abandoned the pocket. But instead of attempting to truck his way into the end zone, the artist formerly known as the "Belldozer" rolled right.

Near the sidelines, he waited, and waited. And then when he couldn’t wait any longer, Bell stuck a pass into the chest of receiver Durron Neal for a three-yard touchdown.

[+] EnlargeBlake Bell
AP Photo/Sue OgrockiJunior Blake Bell, considered the front-runner to start for the Sooners before the spring, had the best day of all the QBs in OU's spring game.
Bell said after Oklahoma’s Red-White spring game that he wanted to show he could "sling it around a little bit, too."

And sling it he did, demonstrating that the power running that made him a fan-favorite the past two seasons is just one facet of his arsenal.

Bell completed 14 of 23 passes for 213 yards and two touchdowns -- with no turnovers -- Saturday. He also showed the most poise and precision among the quarterbacks to seize momentum in the QB competition heading into the summer.

"I missed a couple throws," Bell said, "But overall, I thought I made some good plays, and was pretty accurate with the ball."

Bell displayed that accuracy from the opening possession, quickly moving the offense down the field with three completions to Jalen Saunders. The drive ultimately ended in a touchdown, when wide receiver Lacoltan Bester scooped up a Damien Williams fumble and raced 35 yards for the score.

(Read full post)

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