Michigan Wolverines: Jim Delany

Whether you're ready or not, Maryland and Rutgers officially become Big Ten members on Tuesday.

And the league is welcoming its two newest schools with a pair of celebrations in the East, which is now a Big Ten region.

Festivities began for Maryland on Monday with the official launch of the Terrapins' new Big Ten inaugural season apparel at the Under Armour Brand House in Baltimore. Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany attended the ceremony, along with Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson and other Terrapins coaches and staff. Delany showed off some of the new gear in this photo:

 
The celebration was set to continue Monday night at Nationals Park, where Maryland and the Big Ten Network will host a block party before the Washington Nationals take on the Colorado Rockies. The league mascots also were on the loose in Washington D.C., leading to some fun pictures like this one:

 
And this one:

 
And, OK, one more, because who can get enough mascot pictures?

 
Maryland will continue to recognize its entry into the Big Ten with an on-campus party at Mitchell Field from noon to 1:30 p.m on Tuesday. The event will include the unveiling of a special Big Ten ice cream.

Rutgers gets its day in the sun on Tuesday, as Delany will visit the campus for the "R B1G Party" at High Point Solutions Stadium. The event begins at 7 p.m. and is free for fans to attend. A fireworks display will begin around 9 p.m.

So, yeah, this is all happening. We'll have more on the official Big Ten entrance of Rutgers and Maryland in the blog on Tuesday.

Big Ten's lunch links

June, 23, 2014
Jun 23
12:00
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Back from vacation. Nice to link up again.

Big Ten lunch links

June, 17, 2014
Jun 17
12:00
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You're next, Portugal.
Unlike other conferences, the Big Ten hasn't taken a formal position on an early signing period.

Many league coaches see the benefits but differ on when such a period would start and how exactly it would work. Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany and his colleagues will discuss early signing dates at the Conference Commissioners Association meeting this month.

Delany sees pros and cons both to the current national signing date (first Wednesday of February) and the proposed dates for a signing period in late November or December. He doesn't agree with the Aug. 1 signing date recommended by the ACC after its meetings last month.

"We have real, emerging, serious problems in the summertime," Delany told ESPN.com. "Camps, 7-on-7, it's starting to mimic men's basketball's summer, and I don't think that's been particularly healthy. What I think would be best, given that we're working through all the [NCAA] restructuring ... that we take an opportunity to study this and really look at what underlying regulations need to be changed.

"I don't think simply changing the date on a National Letter of Intent works without a fairly deep review."

The discussion about an early signing period in college football is hardly a new one. The American Football Coaches Association in 2008 drafted a proposal for a mid-December signing period, but the commissioners ultimately voted it down.

Since then, recruits are making their verbal commitments earlier and earlier. There is more flipping to different schools, and the number of transfers is rising. Coaches like Maryland's Randy Edsall and Nebraska's Bo Pelini have proposed ways to slow down the recruiting process.

"We know the consequences of what we're doing, and I don't think anybody's comfortable with the babysitting and the flipping and summer environment," Delany said. "I don't want to anything unless we take a real, hard look at football recruitment: what's working and what's not.

"I would be reluctant to jump into any quick fix."

Big Ten lunch links

June, 5, 2014
Jun 5
12:00
PM ET
Meet me in Chicago.
  • Michigan sophomore tight end Jake Butt is jogging again, raising some hopes that he might be back early in the season after having ACL surgery in February.
  • There's an established starter in place in the Michigan State backfield, but that isn't stopping Madre London from setting some high goals for his first season on campus.
  • Urban Meyer reflects on the NCAA sanctions and the circumstances that brought him back to Ohio State.
  • The Penn State defense isn't generating all that much buzz, but a pair of tackles could be worthy of a little attention heading into the season.
  • Nebraska associate athletic director Paul Meyers, a man considered a confidant of Bo Pelini, resigned his post this week, and Steven M. Sipple asks a few questions about the move.
  • Purdue fans longing to be represented on the team helmet are having their dreams come true.
  • The Indiana receiving corps set the bar high a year ago. Can the Hoosiers match the production this fall?
  • TCF Bank Stadium will still have separate logos for the Gophers and the Vikings while the two share the facility for the next two seasons.
  • Big Ten fever is apparently running wild at Rutgers, where season-ticket sales are on the rise.
  • A revised witness list in the O'Bannon case includes Jim Delany's name.

Big Ten lunch links

May, 15, 2014
May 15
12:00
PM ET
The spring meeting of Big Ten athletic directors is over. Back to the offseason lists and polls.
  • Wrapping up from Rosemont, the “cost of attendance” discussion remains alive.
  • Good take by Andrew Logue on the complexities of Jim Delany.
  • More Big Ten athletic directors weigh in on the eastward movement of the league. Just don't expect the football championship game to go the way of the basketball tourney.
  • Iowa AD Gary Barta comments on the status of the Hawkeyes’ series with Iowa State.
  • Illinois wants to make it clear: No alcohol sales at Memorial Stadium. But is Michigan heading in a different direction? Other athletic directors discuss the issue.
  • Michigan State and Notre Dame would like to keep playing, but the format of the series will change.
  • More details from the incident that that led to the arrest of former Minnesota and Rutgers QB Philip Nelson.
  • Former Chicago prep star running back Ty Isaac is leaving USC. Next stop, the Big Ten?
  • Solid results for Big Ten football programs in the NCAA’s new report for 2012-13 on academic progress rates, including a big jump for new member Maryland.
  • Rare insight into the work of Mark Pantoni, the Ohio State director of player personnel, a job with a wide range of responsibilities.
  • Tom Shatel remembers the football career of a former two-sport Nebraska star who continues to bring a grinder mentality to his alma mater.
  • Ex-Nebraska QB Taylor Martinez fails a physical with the Eagles. Some insight into the alleged bike theft by Nebraska linebacker Josh Banderas.
  • A Rutgers offensive line recruit brings plenty of intensity.
  • Eugene Lewis looks like a worthy replacement for Allen Robinson at Penn State. James Franklin has watched “Moneyball” at least seven times. A new Nittany Lions logo arrives as part of a $10 million scoreboard replacement project.
  • It’s a tradition at Michigan for its quarterback pledges join in the recruiting battle.
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- The SEC and ACC think eight is great, but the Big Ten has no plans to go back on its move to nine league games beginning in the 2016 season.

The Big Ten isn't ignoring the upcoming college football playoff and the potential paths to the field of four, but its reasoning for the move -- namely, to play one another more often in an expanded conference -- hasn't changed.

"Fans like Big Ten games," league commissioner Jim Delany said Wednesday. "If you look at Big Ten attendance around Big Ten games, it tends to be better than the average nonconference game. Also, the commissioners have been clear about strength of schedule and winning championships in conference as the tiebreakers in the college football playoff.

"That's an additional reason for us to do that."

But the move to nine league games doesn't mitigate the challenge of nonconference scheduling. In fact, the unbalanced home-road ratio, combined with a league-wide initiative to stop scheduling FCS opponents, has created new issues to navigate.

Several Big Ten athletic directors this week talked about a smaller inventory of nonleague opponents. This drives up the cost for Big Ten teams to schedule home games that aren't returned (guarantee games). Most Big Ten teams require seven home football games per year to meet budget demands.

"Where are the guarantees going to go as far as the demand and the supply of the opponents to come in and play you?" Michigan State AD Mark Hollis said. "You only have three nonconference [games]. You can have one home-and-home situation and then have to buy two games to get to your seven.

"If the net on those games becomes a level where the visiting team's making more than the home team, then you have to start looking at other options."

Hollis has been reluctant to explore neutral-site games, and while some Big Ten teams have them scheduled -- Wisconsin opens the next three seasons against SEC opponents at neutral sites -- most want to keep games on campus. The Big Ten is working with its schools on scheduling for the 2016, 2017, 2018 seasons and beyond. Hollis thinks more scheduling agreements will happen in the short term rather than games 10-15 years in advance.

One idea discussed this week at both ACC and Big Ten meetings is league members scheduling one another in games that don't count in the conference standings. Michigan and Minnesota considered scheduling a nonleague game in 2010, a season where the longtime rivals weren't on each other's slates.

Iowa and Penn State last season scheduled a nonleague wrestling meet and will continue to do when the teams don't match up on the Big Ten schedule.

"We put together our own parameters in terms of the cost," Iowa AD Gary Barta said, "so I could see some of that happening potentially in other sports."

Michigan State on Tuesday announced a home-and-home series with Arizona State, which Hollis called a "blessing" because of the quality of the opponent and the location. The Spartans play longtime rival Notre Dame in 2016 and 2017, and Hollis told local reporters that MSU and Notre Dame have a verbal agreement for a home-and-home series in 2026-27, as well as a possible neutral-site game in Chicago in 2023.

The SEC's and ACC's schedule decisions sparked strong reaction because the five major conferences, competing for four playoff spots, won't have a standardized schedule model. But Big Ten leaders don't seem concerned about the differences.

"I could conceive of somebody playing eight conference games and four very strong nonconference games, and having a stronger strength of schedule than somebody who played nine conference games and three weak nonconference games," Delany said. "So we've tried to address it with more conference games, one major game against an opponent from a group-of-five conference, and that we're not playing [FCS] teams."

Big Ten lunch links

May, 12, 2014
May 12
12:00
PM ET
Happy belated Mother's Day to all the moms out there. I got to spend the first part of Sunday with mine before flying home to see my wife on her first Mother's Day. Good times.

To the links ...

Big Ten Friday mailblog

May, 9, 2014
May 9
4:00
PM ET
Is it a bit drafty in here? Wishing you a great weekend.

Twitter? Yes, please.

Let's check that inbox ...

Shane from Maine writes: I usually ask Wolverines-related questions, but something else caught my attention. What are your thoughts on Iowa's schedule? It looks REALLY soft. Do you think the Hawkeyes have a chance to go undefeated in a season that has their toughest games at home against Wisconsin and Nebraska?

Adam Rittenberg: Iowa's schedule looks extremely beneficial, Shane, but I don't see the Hawkeyes running the table. They're a good team that could build on last season's success, but the Hawkeyes almost always find themselves in close games because their talent isn't head and shoulders above the competition. Easy schedule or hard schedule, you need to be a truly elite team with elite talent to run the table in a major conference (see: 2013 Florida State Seminoles). Iowa will end up on the short end of some close game, but I predict a good season (9-10 wins).


Jeff from Baltimore writes: This week, we saw what I would call (Jim) Delany's most out-of-the-box, hell, out-of-the world, decision in giving the 2017 BBall tourney to D.C. Now, living in Baltimore, I like the idea of cutting out of work early and driving to the Verizon Center, but it won't have the same feeling as if it would and should in either Indy or Chi-town. Do you see him repeating this thinking for the football championship?

Adam Rittenberg: Jeff, I wrote about this back in January. There's no desire to move the football championship game outside of the Midwest. The Big Ten loves Indianapolis and everything it brings, and it could consider sites like Chicago, Minneapolis and Detroit in future years. The difference with football is the event includes only two teams and two fan bases, not all 14. It's less likely to draw general Big Ten fans than the basketball tournament, a multi-day event featuring more games and teams. Big Ten deputy commissioner Brad Traviolia said of the hoops tournament: "Regardless of where you place it, you're going to have a team or two that basically will be a home team, whether it's Indiana and Purdue in Indianapolis or whether it's Maryland in D.C. or Rutgers and Penn State in New York." Geography matters more for the football title game.


Grant from San Francisco writes: As a lifelong Spartans fan, I am becoming increasingly weary of all the unbridled optimism surrounding the program this coming season. I have experienced this before and know just how fast the wheels can come off. You guys spent some time with the team, so maybe you can provide some insight. With a huge matchup in Week 2 against Oregon, what exactly is [Mark] Dantonio doing now that the team is starting at the top with everything to lose, rather than starting unranked with nothing to lose? Quotes keep coming out about "we are hungry"... "we are tired of talking about last year"... but how exactly are they preventing complacency?

Adam Rittenberg: Grant, I understand your concern about MSU's history when starting on top, but it's also important to acknowledge the culture change under Mark Dantonio. This team has won 11 or more games in three of the past four seasons. MSU had a disappointing 2012 season but was a few plays away from winning eight or nine games. Also, the quarterback situation with Connor Cook is much more stable than it was in 2012. Brian Bennett visited the Spartans this spring and came away thinking they're locked in and not getting complacent. The continuity in the coaching staff really helps, and most MSU players suffered through the 2012 season and haven't forgotten it. You don't really know how a team responds until the games begin, but Dantonio isn't the type to let anyone take their foot off of the gas. His recent track record confirms this.


Rolf from Seattle writes: I have to question your Ohio State draft pick of Devin Gardner. First off he went to that school up north, so that would never happen. Second, he is going to be gone next year anyway and doesn't leave Ohio State with any more time left than Braxton. Third, with three backups behind Braxton, another year in the system should get at least two of them ready to carry the torch. Fourth, Devin went to TSUN!!!!! Anyway, the blog is still awesome.

Adam Rittenberg: Thanks, Rolf, and yes, I realize sending a Michigan player to Ohio State doesn't sit well with all (Justin Boren worked out OK, though). The Buckeyes clearly need a quarterback to replace Braxton Miller, and I'm not confident enough in any of the current backups to step in, especially with a revamped offensive line. Brian had the Buckeyes adding Tre Roberson, who has more eligibility left than Gardner and also fits in a spread offense. But I think Gardner, in the right system like Ohio State's, has more upside. Despite Michigan's offensive line troubles, Gardner still finished second in the league in passing and had some huge games. Ohio State needs a one-year fill-in here, and Gardner is the best option.


Greg from Boulder writes: As a suddenly greedy Penn State fan, should I have any concern that Penn State is having trouble closing the deal on top talent in the secondary in the way-too-early 2015 class?

Adam Rittenberg: Concern? About Penn State's 2015 class? No, don't be concerned. What James Franklin and his staff have done in the past four months is rather remarkable, especially with the program still under NCAA sanctions. They already have Jarvis Miller in the fold and will add other defensive backs before signing day, which is a very long way away. Also remember that Penn State likely will only lose two players -- safeties Adrian Amos and Ryan Keiser -- from this year's secondary rotation.

Big Ten's lunch links

May, 7, 2014
May 7
12:00
PM ET
Spring, is that you at last? Feel free to stick around a while.
You have questions, I might have answers. Let's find out.

Go to Twitter. Follow us. Then thank us later.

Inbox, what have you today ...

Nick the Quick from Nashville writes: The B1G's programs are raking in the dough. The article Monday on B1G revenue should surprise no one. When will the lesser programs start making more solid and needed financial investments in their football programs? Seems so simple to me. Is it that simple or is this a case of jaded B1G fans desperately looking for answers on why these teams struggle but make money hand over fist?

Adam Rittenberg: Nick, this topic fascinates me, and I wrote extensively about it last season. It doesn't seem to add up: record revenues generated, but a football league that hasn't consistently been among the nation's elite. As Big Ten athletic directors told me, there are other factors to consider like sponsoring so many non-revenue sports, which is at the core of the league's broad-based philosophy but isn't the best business approach. Most Big Ten schools have made significant investments in recent years, whether it's facilities or coaches' salaries, but there's still a sizable gap in football budgets. As Indiana AD Fred Glass told me, Michigan made $147.5 million in football revenue last year, while Indiana made only about $4.5 million.

The money and investments definitely matter, but as B1G commissioner Jim Delany said, it's not a one-to-one relationship and doesn't guarantee success.


Glen from Minneapolis writes: Everyone has been saying the Gophers have become improved recently, including yourself. However, there always seem to be a caveat that follows (loss of Ra'Shede Hageman, Mitch Leidner's abilities to pass, etc.). I would like to know -- with your ranking of the Gophers' 2014 conference schedule as the second toughest in the league and first impressions post-spring game/practices -- will the Gophers make a bowl game? Should fans be as happy (or grateful) about a 6-6 record as they were with going 8-4 last season?

Adam Rittenberg: Asking college football fans to be pragmatic is akin to asking them to abstain from beer or charred meat on Saturdays. I get that. But I think it would serve Minnesota fans well this season. Minnesota very well could have a better team that ends up with a worse regular-season record. The crossover games are tough, and Minnesota has three very challenging league road games (Wisconsin, Nebraska and Michigan). But Gophers fans should expect at least six wins and a bowl appearance. Anything less would qualify as a disappointment from a fourth-year coaching staff that returns some nice pieces. Should fans be grateful at 6-6? No. But they also should be realistic about what Minnesota is up against.


Ethan from New Jersey writes: Do you think the B1G would ever allow permanent end-of-season rivalry games with either the Big 12 or the ACC like the SEC and ACC already do? (think Penn State-Pitt, Iowa-Iowa State, Nebraska-Oklahoma) I think if could give a true rival to some teams in the league without one and could sometimes prove the depth of the B1G by having consistent Power 5 play.

Adam Rittenberg: Ethan, the Big Ten really wants to make the final weekend about its own product, not out-of-conference games. The league wants to give Nebraska-Iowa time to grow. Maybe it evolves into a nice rivalry, maybe not. I hope the Big Ten considers allowing Penn State to play Pitt at the end of the season. There's no other league rival for PSU, and the Pitt series has a ton of history and typically took place between Nov. 19-30. I can't see Iowa-Iowa State moving to the end of the season. Aside from the 2001 game, it has taken place in September since the series resumed in 1977. Bottom line: The Big Ten wants to maximize its own rivalries that weekend, but it should be open to nonconference games involving certain teams.


Pete from Cincinnati writes: Agree with your assessment rating the strength of crossover schedules this coming season. This can't be an accident, can it? The conference knows the West needs credibility, and to get that it needs Iowa and Wisconsin to be successful. The conference's best shot at a title team is in Columbus. And while we're at it, let's do what we can to make sure the new guys don't wind up too high in the standings, lest people start talking. Thoughts?

Adam Rittenberg: Pete, while I appreciate your conspiracy theories and think Wisconsin is extremely fortunate to draw both Big Ten newcomers in Years 1 and 2, I don't know if the league is trying to achieve all the objectives you mention. Remember parity-based scheduling, which pairs historically more successful teams against one another more often? It should go into effect in 2016 and beyond. "You'll see Wisconsin and Nebraska and Iowa playing a lot of competition against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan," Jim Delany told ESPN.com last year. Wisconsin in 2016 has crossovers against Michigan, Michigan State and Ohio State -- in successive weeks, no less. Iowa has both Penn State and Michigan that year, in addition to Rutgers. So while I agree the West Division needs credibility, the initial crossover schedules aren't indicative of how things will be most years.


Punky's Girl from Virginia Beach, Va., writes: Could Jabrill Peppers play as an occasional WR, like Charles Woodson did? If so, would he be a double threat?

Adam Rittenberg: He would be if he replicates what he did in high school as a two-way player at the college level. It could happen, but I don't think it will right away unless Michigan really struggles at receiver this year. Michigan coach Brady Hoke, asked in February about Peppers' potential to play offense, urged patience. Peppers first has to show what he can do at cornerback. "Could there be a play in there somewhere for him offensively?" Hoke said. "There could be. But let's let the kid walk on campus, go to a class during the summer and be a freshman."

Big Ten's lunch links

May, 6, 2014
May 6
12:00
PM ET
Hodor.

Big Ten Friday mailblog

April, 18, 2014
Apr 18
4:30
PM ET
Wishing you a great spring weekend (right, Mother Nature?). Join the Twitter train.

Sup?

Kevin from Pittsburgh writes: This might sound like a weird question but do you think Penn State's recruiting success this offseason will have any impact on the NCAA potentially lifting the bowl ban? There was some optimism it could be lifted for this season, if not next. But with James Franklin seemingly overcoming the other intended punishments, would the NCAA be worried about a perception of letting PSU off the hook? Stop me if I'm overthinking here but this certainly wouldn't be the first time the NCAA has made a decision based on it's own perception.

Adam Rittenberg: No, it certainly would not, Kevin. Trying to get inside the mind of the NCAA is a dangerous and often futile endeavor. My hope is any decision made about the sanctions would have nothing to do with how Franklin is recruiting. Penn State is being assessed for how it conducts itself as a program from a compliance and integrity standpoint, and the success in games or in recruiting really shouldn't matter with potentially reduced penalties. Also, the 2015 recruiting class won't impact the 2014 team, which has some depth problems stemming from the NCAA sanctions.


Jim from Albany, N.Y., writes: As a season-ticket holder who doesn't mind the 200+ mile trip for every home game, I'm wondering what Rutgers (and/or Maryland too) do to be accepted by the average B1G fan? Reading everything from "meh" to "I'm never going to attend a Rutgers/Maryland game in my team's stadium" is tough when the average Rutgers fan is thrilled about being able to take a step up. I've not read this in any of the other realignment moves in any of the conferences (except perhaps WVU in the Big 12 or Mizzou in the SEC), but not so vitriolic as the B1G boards. Comments?

Adam Rittenberg: Jim, there are a few factors involved here. Many Big Ten fans didn't want the league to expand again. Those who did wanted additions with stronger athletic traditions than Rutgers. Although Scarlet Knights football had a breakthrough under Greg Schiano, Rutgers doesn't match the historic accomplishments of Nebraska and Penn State, the Big Ten's most recent expansion additions. There's just not an obvious reason to get excited. Also, the demographic argument the Big Ten used with adding Rutgers and Maryland, while making sense on several levels, doesn't resonate with the average fan. There are also geographic and cultural differences between the traditional Big Ten footprint and the East Coast. Penn State deals with a similar divide.


B1G fan from the Midwest writes: I know I'm about to ask something blasphemous to some longtime B1G fans, but is there a name change in the conference's future? Myself included, most members of the B1G are proud of tradition and are reluctant to change. I can understand sweeping it under the rug at 11 teams or maybe even 12, but when it's at 14 shouldn't it be considered? Maybe something non number related like the SEC and ACC have.

Adam Rittenberg: It's not happening, B1G fan. Commissioner Jim Delany actually was open to a change when the Big Ten added Penn State in 1989, but the league presidents and other power players wanted the name to remain. Same thing happened when the league added Nebraska. There's too much meaning and history in that name, and while it's quite mathematically inaccurate, most Big Ten folks can live with it.

Delany and Michigan athletic director Dave Brandon addressed the league name this week at an event in Detroit. Brandon said, "If you look at the Big Ten Conference, you've got brand equity that's been built over decades and decades. The Big Ten means something." So there you have it.


John from Kansas City, Mo., writes: The B1G has 6 members (Iowa, Nebraska, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Purdue) located in what are considered "talent poor" states. That is half of the conference (MD and Rutgers excluded) that has to actively recruit outside of their backyard. Not to mention they all border states that have more than one FBS school. The SEC on the other hand, has 10 schools in the top 15 "talent rich" states, so it seems the recruiting soil is a bit more fertile in the South. Meyer and Franklin are obviously great recruiters but they are also located squarely in the middle of two very saturated regions and are pulling huge numbers from their immediate footprint(s). Location and population are just as big of factors in recruiting as to which coach is running the show. It seems unfair to assume the B1G coaches aren't working hard enough.

Adam Rittenberg: Some good points here, John. The population deck is undoubtedly stacked in the SEC's favor, no matter which set of recruiting rankings you trust. And you're right that Ohio State and Penn State can recruit locally and regionally more than programs like Iowa, Wisconsin and Nebraska. I wonder if there's an extra gear that both Meyer and Franklin --as well as their assistants -- reach on the recruiting trail. I know a lot of Big Ten coaches that label their programs "developmental" and take pride in that distinction. I wonder if that approach limits how much they can push for the upper-tier recruits.


Bruce from Los Angeles writes: Simple question: If Michigan fails to win 8 games next year, Brady Hoke is fired? Yes or No?

Adam Rittenberg: A simple question, Bruce, but a not-so simple answer. If Michigan endures a wave of injuries, loses several close games in the final minute and beats one of its rivals on the road -- Michigan State, Ohio State or Notre Dame -- I think Hoke stays. Dave Brandon is firmly in Hoke's corner and doesn't want to make a change. But if Michigan remains relatively healthy, endures the same problems it did in 2013 and gets blown out in rivalry games, the pressure on Brandon could be too great and Hoke would need to go.

Big Ten Monday mailbag

April, 7, 2014
Apr 7
5:00
PM ET
It's Monday afternoon, which means it's time for more of your emails. Keep them coming.

S.H. Tan from Singapore writes: Now that UConn is in the championship game for both NCAA men's and women's basketball, should the B1G grab the Huskies before they fall into the clutches of the ACC? Not only will this solidify the B1G's standing as a premier basketball conference, it will give B1G an even greater presence and share of the New York/New England markets, and UConn is only a few seasons removed from the Fiesta Bowl.

Brian Bennett: Maybe Jim Delany can strike a deal before 9 p.m. ET on Monday so the Big Ten will have a chance to finally win another basketball national title. I kid, but man, the league has had some tough breaks on the hardwood. There's no doubt Connecticut is a powerhouse program in both men's and women's basketball, and the fact it will languish in the American Athletic Conference for a while is a shame. The Huskies desperately want to get in a power league, and the ACC and Big Ten are the only ones that really make sense for the school.

But Connecticut wasn't a main candidate for the Big Ten in the last round of expansion and is not really high on the league's radar now. While adding the school would open up some new TV markets in the Northeast, it doesn't really bring potentially fertile recruiting ground the way Rutgers and Maryland did. And though UConn has, unlike Rutgers, actually been to a BCS game, the football program still doesn't provide much juice to the Big Ten. Maybe most importantly, UConn is not a member of the Association of American Universities, which would be a big sticking point for conference leaders.

If expansion had anything to do with basketball, the Huskies would have found a new home by now. But as we know, it's all about football.




Alien Spartan from Somewhere In Open Space writes: While we Spartans bask in the aura of corporal appeasement -- think dominating Michigan -- I can't help feeling sorry for our in-state rival. There were so many times I hated them and now I want them to do well. As a kid, I only heard the U of M fight song on the radio. Then I graduated from MSU. I am so proud to be a Spartan! Especially now. Here's my question. Do you think Nussmeier will make a significant difference? For their sake, I hope he does. Not to the point that they beat us, though.

Brian Bennett: Up above, aliens hover, making home movies for the folks back home. (Sorry for the Radiohead nerd-out). I do think Doug Nussmeier is going to help Michigan's offense. The Wolverines talked a lot about becoming a physical, pro-style offense under Al Borges but never really came close to achieving that. Nussmeier is stressing the north-south running game and a simpler blocking scheme that I think will help give Michigan more of an identity. He also brings a lot of energy to the team that the program needed, in my opinion. The big question is whether the Wolverines have the skill on the offensive line to fully execute Nussmeier's vision, and that group still has a whole lot to prove.




Pat from Iowa writes: Could you call Iowa's 4-8 2012 season a fluke? They have never had that bad of record in more than 10 years. Many of the losses were by less than three points. And then they come back with an 8-4 record this year. Do you think they were much better than their record shows?

Brian Bennett: I wouldn't say the 2012 Hawkeyes were much better than their record showed. They earned that record, thanks to a crummy passing game and a defense that didn't intimidate anybody. Key injuries also played a big factor, as did the bumpy transition to a new offensive system under Greg Davis. And that season somehow included a win over a team that made a BCS game (Northern Illinois). So I wouldn't call 2012 a fluke, but I would say it's more of a blip on Kirk Ferentz's tenure than anything else.




Charley from New York writes: I know you two guys are constantly lobbying in your blogs for Big Ten coaches to be paid more and for Big Ten schools to spend money on sports facilities, so is it fair to assume you support a system where coaches can be paid millions while half their players don't get degrees? When you said, "but whether [Colter is] eventually viewed as a pioneer who helped improve athletes' causes or someone who brought down college sports as we know them can't possibly be known yet," it seems as if you don't understand that in order to improve the lives of college footballers, the system as we know it must be "brought down" and that you seem not to want that to happen.

Brian Bennett: It's a fair point to bring up that Adam and I often talk about coaches who deserve raises or schools that need to improve their facilities. But understand those opinions are in the context of teams trying to compete for championships in the Big Ten. The league is swimming in money from its TV deals, and so programs need to reinvest that cash into coaching salaries and infrastructure if they want to keep up. Schools are under no obligation to participate in the escalating college sports arms race, but if they want off that treadmill, then they have to stop taking the TV money and get out of big-time sports altogether.

I support college players in their quest to have a much larger voice in their sport and for them to receive a larger piece of the pie. I'm not so sure unionization is the best way to go about that. There's no question that major changes need to happen in college sports, and I think we're on the precipice of that. Do I want to see college sports "brought down?" Well, obviously, I write about college football for a living and, like most of you reading this, I am a big fan of college sports in general. There are few things better in life than a college football Saturday or the NCAA tournament. I remain hopeful that greed and arrogance don't prevent finding some middle ground that works for all sides.

Big Ten's lunch links

March, 17, 2014
Mar 17
12:00
PM ET
Brackets are out. Who ya got? I'll be in Milwaukee for hoops duty later this week. Excited to check out Michigan, Wisconsin and others.

To the links ...

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BIG TEN SCOREBOARD

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Tuesday, 12/30
Wednesday, 12/31
Thursday, 1/1
Friday, 1/2
Saturday, 1/3
Sunday, 1/4
Monday, 1/12