Michigan Wolverines: Drew Dileo

If you follow former Michigan tackle Taylor Lewan on Twitter, you've probably seen the hashtag #nobaddays. He signs almost every tweet with the phrase, whether he's getting picked by the Tennessee Titans in the NFL draft or being cut in line by an old lady at the airport.

[+] EnlargeTaylor Lewan
Jim Rogash/Getty ImagesOff-the-field issues have clouded the perception of Taylor Lewan, who was the first Big Ten player picked in the NFL draft earlier this month.
But it does appear that Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 were bad days for Lewan.

Michigan lost a heartbreaker Nov. 30 to Ohio State 42-41 in Lewan's final home game at the Big House, dropping him to 1-3 against the rival Buckeyes. Hours later, in the early morning of Dec. 1, Lewan was involved in an incident involving an Ohio State fan. Lewan claimed he was trying to break up a fight and relayed his version of what happened to NFL teams in the predraft process. But Buckeyes fan James Hughes claimed Lewan punched him in the face, and Lewan was charged with one count of aggravated assault and two counts of assault and battery.

The Associated Press on Thursday obtained the police report from the incident, which includes statements from Lewan's ex-girlfriend, who claims Lewan assaulted Hughes.
Alexandra Dileo, whose brother was a teammate of Lewan's, said "Taylor is lying" about his actions on Dec. 1.

"He knocked the guy to the ground and he punched him," she told police in a telephone interview Jan. 29, according to the report. She recalled hearing Lewan tell his mother "I knocked a guy out" the next morning while they were having breakfast.

Alexandra Dileo is the sister of former Michigan wide receiver Drew Dileo, one of Lewan's good friends on the team.

As soon as the AP story broke Thursday, some Michigan fans questioned Alexandra Dileo's credibility, since she and Lewan had broken up and Lewan soon will become a millionaire with the Titans. Lewan's attorneys undoubtedly will make the same argument, which Dileo acknowledged in her conversation with police.
Dileo expressed concerns to police that people would feel she was lying because she and Lewan had broken up, according to the report. But she "stated she knows what happened and Taylor is lying."

What really happened Dec. 1 in Ann Arbor depends on whom you believe. At the very least, it creates an awkward situation for Lewan and Drew Dileo.

It also raises more questions about Lewan, one of the more polarizing star players in the Big Ten in recent years.

"I was actually breaking something up and some guy said that I slugged him, but that's not who I am off the field," Lewan told reporters at the NFL combine in February. "That's not the kind of person I am."

Who is Taylor Lewan? Good citizen or bully? Textbook tackle or dirty player? All of the above?

Few would deny he's an exceptional football player -- a tall, strong, athletic, smart offensive tackle who should have a long NFL career. He's a two-time All-American and three-time All-Big Ten selection who won Big Ten offensive lineman of the year honors in both 2012 and 2013. Any credible list of Michigan's top offensive linemen in the past 20 years should include Lewan's name.

But he'll also be remembered for twisting the facemask of Michigan State safety Isaiah Lewis in last year's loss to the Spartans. Lewan later apologized.

Two years earlier, he was on the receiving end of a punch from Michigan State defensive end William Gholston that resulted in a one-game suspension for Gholston. But many believe Lewan wasn't free of blame in that incident.

Lewan also had to defend himself against allegations he tried to intimidate a woman who said she had been sexually assaulted by Michigan kicker Brendan Gibbons, another of Lewan's friends.

It doesn't add up to a squeaky-clean image, which Lewan acknowledged at the combine.

"It kills me inside," Lewan said. "It probably kills my mother, too. She helped raise me. But yeah, it hurts definitely because the player I am on the field, it's probably really easy to assume all those things about me. But that’s not who I am at all."

Lewan always had an edge to his game. He was a through-the-whistle lineman. Last spring, he told me: "Maybe I'm a little messed up in the head, I don't know, but I enjoy hitting my face on another man's face and trying to put him in the dirt and make him feel every single inch of it. Something about that, it puts me on cloud nine."

In the next breath, he talked about spending his final year at Michigan exploring campus life beyond Schembechler Hall, interacting with regular students and parts of the university that have nothing to do with football. Athletes often live in a bubble and Lewan wanted to venture beyond. It was an impressive and refreshing viewpoint from a guy who turned down millions because, in his mind, he hadn't become a Michigan Man.

Michigan coach Brady Hoke repeatedly defended Lewan's character this spring, noting that assumptions would be made about the Dec. 1 incident until the truth comes out. Hoke pointed out Lewan's work at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and other good things he did in the community during his time as a Wolverine.

"I believe that his character will shine through," Hoke told the NFL Network.

Time will tell if that's the case. Lewan's next court appearance is scheduled for June 16.

It could shape a Michigan legacy that, for now, must be labeled as mixed.

Big Ten lunch links

May, 28, 2014
May 28
12:00
PM ET
Every time an old man starts talking about Napoleon, you know he's going to die.
We're taking snapshots of each position group with each Big Ten team entering the spring. The wide receivers and tight ends are up next.

Illinois: The Illini are looking for more from this group after losing top target Steve Hull, who exploded late in the season to finish just shy of 1,000 receiving yards. While running back Josh Ferguson (50 catches in 2013) will continue to contribute, Illinois could use a boost from Martize Barr, who arrived with high expectations but only had 26 receptions last fall. Another junior-college transfer, Geronimo Allison, could make an impact beginning this spring, but there's some mystery at wideout. Illinois looks more solid at tight end with seniors Jon Davis and Matt LaCosse.

Indiana: Despite the somewhat surprising early departure of All-Big Ten selection Cody Latimer, Indiana should be fine here. Shane Wynn is the veteran of the group after recording 633 receiving yards on 46 catches last season. Kofi Hughes and Duwyce Wilson also depart, so Indiana will be leaning more on Nick Stoner and Isaiah Roundtree. The Hoosiers have high hopes for early enrollee Dominique Booth, a decorated recruit who could fill Latimer's spot on the outside. Productive tight end Ted Bolser departs and several players will compete, including early enrollee Jordan Fuchs.

Iowa: Almost all the wide receivers are back from a group in which none eclipsed more than 400 receiving yards in 2013. Balance is nice, but separation could be nicer for the Hawkeyes this spring. Kevonte Martin-Manley is the most experienced wideout and has 122 career receptions. Tevaun Smith also returns, and Iowa fans are excited about big-play threat Damond Powell, who averaged 24.2 yards on only 12 receptions last season. Iowa loses its top red-zone target in tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz and will need Jake Duzey to deliver more Ohio State-like performances.

Maryland: When the Terrapins get healthy, they might have the Big Ten's best wide receiving corps. Stefon Diggs and Deon Long, both of whom sustained broken legs against Wake Forest last season, have the ability to stretch the field as both averaged more than 15 yards per reception before the injuries struck. Leading receiver Levern Jacobs also returns, alongside junior Nigel King and sophomore Amba Etta-Tawo, who averaged more than 16 yards per catch in 2013. Marcus Leak, who started seven games in 2012, rejoins the team after a year away. The Terps are unproven at tight end after losing Dave Stinebaugh.

Michigan: There's a reason why some Michigan fans want Devin Gardner to return to wide receiver for his final season. The Wolverines are thin on the perimeter after losing Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo. Redshirt sophomores Jehu Chesson and Amara Darboh are both candidates to start, and Dennis Norfleet could be the answer in the slot. But there's plenty of opportunity for younger players like Drake Harris, an early enrollee. Michigan's best pass-catching option, Devin Funchess, is listed as a tight end but plays more like a receiver. The Wolverines will be without their second-string tight end, Jake Butt, who suffered an ACL tear in winter conditioning.

Michigan State: Remember all the justified angst about this group a year ago? It has pretty much gone away as the Spartans wideouts rebounded nicely in 2013. Bennie Fowler departs, but MSU brings back its top two receivers in Tony Lippett and Macgarrett Kings, who showed explosiveness down the stretch last fall. Aaron Burbridge had a bit of a sophomore slump but provides another option alongside veteran Keith Mumphery, who averaged 16.6 yards per catch in 2013. Josiah Price leads the tight end group after a solid freshman season.

Minnesota: Here's a group to watch during spring practice, particularly the wide receivers. Minnesota has proven it can run the ball and defend under Jerry Kill, but the passing game was putrid in 2013, ranking last in the Big Ten and 115th nationally. Youth is partly to blame, and while the Gophers still lack experience, they can expect more from promising players like Drew Wolitarsky and Donovahn Jones. Senior Isaac Fruechte provides a veteran presence. Minnesota looks solid at tight end with sophomore Maxx Williams, the team's receiving yards leader (417) in 2013.

Nebraska: The Huskers lose a significant piece in Quincy Enunwa, who led the team in receiving yards (753) and had three times as many receiving touchdowns (12) as anyone else in 2013. Kenny Bell is set to recapture the No. 1 receiver role, which he had in 2012, and comes off of a 52-catch season as a junior. Nebraska must build around Bell this spring with players like the mustachioed Jordan Westerkamp, who had 20 catches as a freshman, including a rather memorable one to beat Northwestern. Will Jamal Turner turn the corner this offseason? Juniors Sam Burtch and Taariq Allen also return. Cethan Carter started six games at tight end last fall and should take over the top spot there as Jake Long departs.

Northwestern: The passing game fell short of expectations in 2013, but there's reason for optimism as Northwestern returns its top three pass-catchers in Tony Jones, Christian Jones and Dan Vitale. The two Joneses (no relation), who combined for 109 catches in 2013, lead the receiving corps along with junior Cameron Dickerson. Speedy Rutgers transfer Miles Shuler provides a playmaking spark, possibly at slot receiver. Vitale, who had a somewhat disappointing sophomore season, has All-Big Ten potential at the superback (tight end) spot. Although Northwestern rarely plays true freshmen, superback Garrett Dickerson, Cameron's brother, could see the field right away.

Ohio State: A group that drew heavy criticism from coach Urban Meyer two springs ago is stockpiling talent. Devin Smith is the familiar name, a big-play senior who has started each of the past two seasons and boasts 18 career touchdowns. Ohio State must replace top wideout Corey Brown and will look for more from Evan Spencer. Michael Thomas has stood out in practices but must translate his performance to games. This could be a breakout year for H-back Dontre Wilson, who averaged nine yards per touch as a freshman. Buckeyes fans are eager to see redshirt freshmen Jalin Marshall and James Clark, and incoming players like Johnnie Dixon could make a splash right away. Ohio State returns an elite tight end in Jeff Heuerman.

Penn State: The Lions have very different depth situations at receiver and tight end. They're looking for contributors on the perimeter after losing Allen Robinson, the Big Ten's top wide receiver the past two seasons, who accounted for 46 percent of the team's receiving production in 2013. Brandon Felder also departs, leaving Geno Lewis as the likeliest candidate to move into a featured role. Richy Anderson also returns, but there will be plenty of competition/opportunity at receiver, a position new coach James Franklin targeted in recruiting with players like Chris Godwin and Saeed Blacknall. Things are much more stable at tight end as the Lions return three talented players in Jesse James, Kyle Carter and Adam Breneman.

Purdue: If you're looking for hope at Purdue, these spots aren't bad places to start. There are several promising young players like receiver DeAngelo Yancey, who recorded a team-leading 546 receiving yards as a freshman. Cameron Posey also had a decent freshman year (26 catches, 297 yards), and Danny Anthrop averaged 18.4 yards as a sophomore. A full offseason with quarterbacks Danny Etling and Austin Appleby should help the group. Tight end also should be a strength as Justin Sinz, who led Purdue with 41 catches last season, is back along with Gabe Holmes, who returns after missing most of 2013 with a wrist injury.

Rutgers: The good news is tight end Tyler Kroft returns after leading Rutgers in both receptions (43) and receiving yards (573) last season. Kroft will immediately contend for All-Big Ten honors. Things are murkier at wide receiver, where top contributors Brandon Coleman and Quron Pratt both depart. Leonte Carroo took a nice step as a sophomore, averaging 17.1 yards per catch and enters the spring as the frontrunner to become the team's No. 1 wideout. Ruhann Peele is another promising young receiver for the Scarlet Knights, who boast size with Carlton Agudosi (6-foot-6) and Andre Patton (6-4).

Wisconsin: The quarterback competition will gain more attention this spring, but Wisconsin's receiver/tight end situation could be more critical. The Badgers lose Jared Abbrederis, their only major threat at receiver the past two seasons, as well as top tight end Jacob Pedersen. Players like Jordan Fredrick and Kenzel Doe must translate their experience into greater production, and Wisconsin will look for more from young receivers like Alex Erickson and Robert Wheelwright. Help is on the way as Wisconsin signed five receivers in the 2014 class, but wideout definitely is a position of concern right now. Sam Arneson is the logical candidate to step in for Pedersen, but there should be competition as the Badgers lose a lot at the position.
Tags:

Maryland Terrapins, Michigan Wolverines, Big Ten Conference, Illinois Fighting Illini, Indiana Hoosiers, Iowa Hawkeyes, Minnesota Golden Gophers, Nebraska Cornhuskers, Northwestern Wildcats, Ohio State Buckeyes, Penn State Nittany Lions, Purdue Boilermakers, Wisconsin Badgers, Michigan State Spartans, Football Recruiting, Rutgers Scarlet Knights, Robert Wheelwright, Jehu Chesson, Jalin Marshall, Adam Breneman, Amara Darboh, Drew Dileo, Stefon Diggs, Jeremy Gallon, Corey Brown, Jon Davis, Kenny Bell, Kevonte Martin-Manley, Tony Lippett, Devin Smith, Devin Funchess, Drake Harris, Dominique Booth, Jared Abbrederis, C.J. Fiedorowicz, Christian Jones, Cody Latimer, Duwyce Wilson, Isaac Fruechte, Jacob Pedersen, Jamal Turner, Keith Mumphery, Kofi Hughes, Michael Thomas, Quincy Enunwa, Shane Wynn, Ted Bolser, Tony Jones, Evan Spencer, james clark, Aaron Burbridge, Josh Ferguson, Kenzel Doe, Allen Robinson, Jesse James, Kyle Carter, Dan Vitale, Danny Etling, Dontre Wilson, Saeed Blacknall, Chris Godwin, Garrett Dickerson, Cameron Dickerson, Danny Anthrop, Johnnie Dixon, Martize Barr, Gabe Holmes, Alex Erickson, Jordan Fredrick, Austin Appleby, Geronimo Allison, Justin Sinz, Nick Stoner, Steve Hull, Cameron Posey, Damond Powell, MacGarrett Kings, Jake Duzey, Maxx Williams, Richy Anderson, Jordan Westerkamp, Sam Burtch, DeAngelo Yancey, Josiah Price, Donovahn Jones, Drew Wolitarsky, Brandon Coleman, Deon Long, B1G spring positions 14, Amba Etta-Tawo, Andre Patton, Brandon Felder, Carlton Agudosi, Cethan Carter, Dave Stinebaugh, Geno Lewis, Isaiah Roundtree, Jordan Fuchs, Leonte Carroo, Levern Jacobs, Marcus Leak, Matt LaCosse, Miles Shuler, Nigel King, Quron Pratt, Ruhann Peele, Sam Arneson, Taariq Allen, Tevaun Smith, Tyler Kroft

Big Ten Friday mailblog

February, 7, 2014
Feb 7
4:30
PM ET
Signing day is over and spring ball is a few weeks away. Enjoy a quiet weekend.

To the inbox ...

Matt from Omaha writes: Hey Adam, I liked the article "How did B1G's top 2010 recruits pan out?" and, as a Husker fan, decided to look back at some of our recruits to see which names still stood out. In my opinion, it appears that JUCO players seem to be least likely to become a bust when they come to college. Since recruiting isn't an exact science, do you think that it might be easier to evaluate JUCO players, or is my perception of the situation skewed do to the likes of Lavonte David, SJB, and Randy Gregory rolling into Lincoln in recent years?

Adam Rittenberg: Matt, Nebraska certainly has had a very nice run of jucos in recent years. There certainly are a number of juco busts, but you're right that it's often easier to assess those players because they're more physically mature and, in some cases, would have gone right to FBS programs out of high school if not for other reasons (academics, etc). There are risks to taking junior college players, as some have red flags in their background, but Nebraska has seen the rewards of bringing in players like David and Gregory.

[+] EnlargeShane Morris
Christian Petersen/Getty ImagesIs Shane Morris ready to take over as Michigan's starting QB?
Mark from Cincinnati writes: No one would listen when I said, post bowl, that Shane Morris would be the man in '14 for Michigan. NOW---that the debate is out there, I hope to get your opinion. Morris is a future 1st round pick when his days at U of M are over. Devin Gardner will NEVER be an N.F.L Q.B. He will be an offensive weapon. Why would we not make this move now, when D.G can give us another target for Shane? Not like he's new to the position.

Adam Rittenberg: Mark, you're not the first person to mention the possibility of Gardner moving back to wide receiver, which certainly is a position of need for Michigan after losing Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo. I just don't know if I'm buying Morris as much as you are -- not yet, at least. He did a decent job in the bowl game but operated with a limited playbook filled mostly with short, high-percentage passes. I'd like to see him stretch the field more and create big plays when protection breaks down. Keep in mind that Gardner had some huge performance for Michigan last year, and he operated behind a terrible offensive line. If the line doesn't improve -- Doug Nussmeier's scheme could help out the group -- it's asking a lot from a young player like Morris to run the show on his own.

Dan from Lewes, Del., writes: Nobody's done more with less as far as having great recruits in the past than Kirk Ferentz. But as a Hawks fan, I can't help but wonder with the amount of players they've put into the NFL (an extremely high amount compared to the success of the program), why don't more highly ranked recruits want to go there? Would being Alabama or Florida State's 3rd or 4th receiver really be better in the long run? What's the deal?

Adam Rittenberg: Dan, Iowa definitely sells its NFL tradition, but it's not as if programs like Alabama, USC, LSU and Florida State are failing to send players to the next level, too. Those programs are located closer to the top recruiting hotbeds than Iowa, which has to extend its recruiting reach far beyond the state. Iowa also doesn't sell itself as an overly flashy program. That's not Kirk Ferentz's style, but sometimes it might work against Iowa in recruiting some of the elite players, who crave the spotlight. Iowa isn't a program you hear about much in the national media, which is largely by design. But if you want to work with a staff focused on development with a track record of producing NFL players, Iowa is a great place to go.

Chris from Milwaukee writes: Hey Adam, I love recruiting season, but have one pet peeve. Whenever a team loses out on a recruit you start hearing from the fan base the player had academic issues and wasn't going to qualify. Do academic requirements vary from school to school or do they all follow the NCAA Clearinghouse?

Adam Rittenberg: Chris, every school must adhere to initial NCAA eligibility requirements when admitting athletes, but academic standards most definitely vary from program to program. I don't know if the differences are as pronounced as some fans believe them to be, but there different standards, different numbers of academic exceptions, etc., not just from league to league but within each league as well.

John from Northern Michigan writes: I think Brian and you have some explaining to do with this list of top 10 games. First, I just noticed Nebraska's win over Georgia is not included. A B1G team beats a SEC team on New Year's Day and it is not in the top 10? That is actually the biggest oversight, it is easily in the top 10.Second, no way you can justify leaving the Rose Bowl victory out of the #1 position. Try to gain some perspective here, this is only the B1G's second victory in 14 years at the Rose Bowl.

Adam Rittenberg: John, some good points on why the Rose Bowl should have been No. 1, and perhaps we made a mistake there. It certainly was a historic win, not just for Michigan State but the Big Ten. But Nebraska-Georgia? C'mon. Two banged-up teams that had underachieved during the season played a rematch in a bowl game that neither fan base cared that much about. Credit Nebraska for winning and playing well, but that game doesn't belong on a Top 10 list.

Marcus Aurelius from Placer, Calif., writes: When will the NCAA get with the times and allow emailed/scanned letters of intent, like the rest of the world uses for documentation?

Adam Rittenberg: It would be nice, Marcus. Some schools like Northwestern actually are offering programs that allow electronic signatures and email/scanning, but for the most part, it's still all about the fax machine. I spent signing day at Michigan State and some of their assistants were joking about how archaic the faxes are. I know the compliance folks need clear proof of signatures and that the forms are filled out correctly, but we have programs that can do this through email. I think we'll see more and more schools go that route.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The Ohio State Buckeyes were losing it: the game, their composure and possibly their perfect season.

They admittedly became too wrapped up in the emotion of The Game. They started by yapping at Michigan players before and after the whistle. Things quickly got much uglier. A brawl following a Buckeyes kickoff return early in the second quarter resulted in two Ohio State players (starting right guard Marcus Hall and H-back/returner Dontre Wilson) and one Michigan player (linebacker Royce Jenkins-Stone) being ejected for throwing punches.

"Disappointed with that; I don't know where that came from," Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said. "That's unacceptable."

[+] EnlargeFight
AP Photo/Carlos OsorioDontre Wilson was one of two Ohio State players ejected after this second-quarter brawl at Michigan.
Hall exited the field with both middle fingers raised to the crowd. No, he wasn't making the "H" in O-H-I-O. The image quickly made its way around Twitter.

It could have been the lasting image from Ohio State's first loss under Meyer, one that would have ended the Buckeyes' quest for the crystal football.

Instead, No. 3 Ohio State provided some other snapshots not soon to be forgotten in one of the most memorable editions of The Game in its storied history, one Meyer called an instant classic. The Buckeyes will remember running back Carlos Hyde, responding from his fourth-quarter fumble, triggering an overpowering six-play, 65-yard drive that he capped with a 1-yard touchdown run with 2 minutes, 20 seconds to play. Hyde finished with more rushing yards (226) than any Buckeyes player has ever had against Michigan.

They'll also remember redshirt freshman nickelback Tyvis Powell stepping in front of a slant pass to Drew Dileo on the game's decisive two-point play to record the clinching interception. Linebacker Ryan Shazier said the Buckeyes had prepared for two conversion plays from Michigan and the Wolverines ran one of them.

Most of all, they'll remember a 42-41 victory against a Michigan team that gave its best effort in months.

"That was our season on the line," Powell said. "We had 12-0, Gold Pants, chances for the national championship. It just hit me, like, 'Wow, I kind of just saved the season.'"

Quarterback Braxton Miller, who had 153 rushing yards and three touchdowns to go along with two passing touchdowns, noted that every game doesn't go perfectly and teams must handle adversity. But Ohio State hadn't faced any real adversity in weeks, not since an Oct. 19 home game against Iowa, which led at halftime and tied the game entering the fourth quarter. That day, the Buckeyes turned to Miller, Hyde and the Big Ten's best offensive line to mount long, sustained drives.

[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
Gregory Shamus/Getty ImagesBraxton Miller rushed for three touchdowns and threw for two at Michigan.
It was a similar formula Saturday as Ohio State's defense had no answers for quarterback Devin Gardner and a suddenly dynamic Michigan offense, which stirred from its month-long slumber with a brilliant game plan that produced 603 yards and 31 first downs. The Wolverines gained just 158 yards the previous week at Iowa; they had 208 in the first quarter Saturday.

"They kind of looked like a different team," said Shazier, who added 14 more tackles to his swelling season total. "But we knew that would happen. ... It's called a rivalry."

It's a rivalry Ohio State continues to dominate, winning nine of the teams' past 10 meetings. There was little talk afterward of Michigan State and the upcoming Big Ten title game, or the lack of style points in beating an unranked opponent, or where the Buckeyes would wind up in Sunday night's BCS standings.

The road ahead, at least for now, didn't matter much to Meyer or his players.

"We're living in the moment right now," tight end Jeff Heuerman said. "It was such a crazy ending. Everyone's head is still spinning. A win's a win, and we'll take it however we can get it. What's 12 times two? Twenty-four straight wins.

"I'm an econ major. I shouldn't have said that out loud."

Ohio State's overall stock likely fell Saturday, particularly a defense that "didn't execute very well," Meyer said. But it's easy to invest in an offense that has looked unstoppable during Big Ten play, averaging 46 points and 531.3 yards in eight league contests.

The Buckeyes answered three Michigan touchdowns Saturday with touchdowns of their own.

"They matched score for score, and that's tough to do on the road," Meyer said.

Hyde has 1,249 rushing yards and 14 touchdowns in league play, telling ESPN.com that he runs "angry" because of his three-game suspension to begin the season. While Meyer knew his defense needed a breather before the two-point play, the Buckeyes offense was ready for overtime, if needed.

"[Michigan] went for two because they didn't want to go to overtime," Hyde said. "They knew what was going to happen. We would have scored; I have no doubt. We were having success all day."

The days ahead will bring bigger challenges for the Buckeyes, starting with the potential fallout from the fight. The Big Ten is reviewing the officials' report from Saturday's game, as well as video from the fight, to determine if additional discipline is warranted.

Meyer noted after the game that since the fight occurred in the first half, any suspension might not carry over. But the Big Ten typically has added a full game to any player ejected for throwing punches.

"Am I concerned? We're going to enjoy this win, get on the bus and go home," Meyer said, before adding, "I'm concerned about everything."

The fight still could end up costing the Buckeyes, but it didn't on Saturday. They regained their composure just in time, made just enough plays to beat a rival and preserved perfection for another week.

Next stop: Indianapolis.

OSU graphicESPN Stats & Information No Ohio State player has ever rushed for more yards against Michigan than Carlos Hyde did Saturday.
Michigan was an inch, a second, a single miscommunication away from a loss on Saturday.

Without every last detail played to perfection in the waning moments of regulation, the Wolverines wouldn't have attempted that game-tying field goal and wouldn't have had a chance to play for an overtime win against Northwestern in Evanston, Ill.

[+] EnlargeMichigan Wolverines
David Banks-USA TODAY SportsThe Wolverines pulled off a hurry-up field goal in the final seconds vs. Northwestern to force overtime.
“It was one of the best team plays I’ve seen,” Michigan coach Brady Hoke said. “But that whole team and the team getting off the field did a tremendous job.”

There was Matt Wile finding kicker Brendan Gibbons to let him know Michigan would be running a hurry-up field goal. There was Taylor Lewan, Erik Magnuson and Kyle Bosch getting to the sideline in time. And then there were the other linemen getting on to the field in time.

There was Gibbons -- a player whose position is predicated on routine and detail -- getting to the 34-yard line, shuffling back and moving his weight back and forth a few times. In film, special teams coach Dan Ferrigno would tell Gibbons that steps are overrated.

There was snapper Jareth Glanda making sure to get to the ball in time, then waiting for the signal from holder Drew Dileo.

And then there was Dileo, fresh off a vertical route the previous play of the game, on the opposite side, unable to hear the coaches on the sideline. He didn’t know the play call until he saw Gibbons running on to the field. At that point he took off.

And then there was the play within the play -- Dileo’s slide (or as people on Twitter took to calling it, the #DileoPowerSlide).

The slide was for substance, not style (though it definitely added some style points to the game), because every millisecond mattered.

“At first, honestly no, I really didn’t [think I’d make it],” Dileo said. “I saw Brendan run on the field. I looked at the clock and it was six seconds left and so then I just put my head down and ran to where his foot was.”

Dileo remembers signaling for the ball with two seconds remaining, and after three overtimes, the Wolverines were able to successfully celebrate a road win, its special teams and the Dileo power slide.

That slide so perfectly encapsulated the chaos of the moment, the need to do whatever it took -- including a return to Dileo’s baseball days -- in order for the play to work.

Dileo didn’t know whether Lewan started the trend or if it were someone else on Twitter, but it blew up and suddenly -- after a full day of college football -- everyone seemed to be watching and talking about a special teams play that happened in a relatively inconsequential Big Ten game.

With the exception of the impromptu slide, however, that play for Michigan is relatively normal. The hurry-up field goal is something the Wolverines have practiced every week since Hoke and this coaching staff arrived at Michigan.

Though, admittedly, sometimes Hoke makes it a bit more difficult.

“Coach Hoke’s countdown is not a real countdown,” Dileo said. “Sometimes he goes from 10 to one in about four seconds. ... I think the game was probably just a culmination of practice the last three years and we executed really well.”

The execution was there, and for a team that has struggled to make big plays and give their fans something to be excited about, the Wolverines managed to come up the biggest in the moment with the smallest margin for error.

Michigan fans have been in awe of it and Hoke said it was one of the best he has ever been a part of, but was it the best team play Dileo had ever seen?

“I really think so,” Dileo said. “In the last couple days I’ve watched that play over and over and over. And it really is amazing that we got the ball off. Really the whole two-minute drive ... and them getting off the field. It really was amazing.”
It’s mail time. You’ve got questions. And no one is blaming you for that because this team is a bit confusing from time to time. So let’s try to answer some of those.

Send your questions in and we’ll do a mailbag every Tuesday (Twitter: @chanteljennings, Email: jenningsESPN@gmail.com).

Berserk Hippo via Twitter: Is there light ahead on offense? What should make me feel better by offense next year versus now?

A: I think the growth we saw in the offensive line in just a week should give you a bit of hope. So much of the line is based on chemistry, and by the end of this season you’ll have a handful of guys who’ve had significant game experience on the line and an entire offseason to build that chemistry so that next fall they won’t have the growing pains they experienced this season. On top of that, Amara Darboh will return to the wide receivers next season, and I think he and Jehu Chesson could both be huge assets. And the run game, specifically freshmen Derrick Green and De'Veon Smith, should give you some hope for next season. They showed they have vision and they’re downhill runners.

And for everyone calling for Shane Morris to play ... Well, there’s now an entire spring season (which he wasn’t able to enroll for last year) and summer and fall camp for him to compete. Plus, Wilton Speight will be enrolling this January, so there will be a solid three-man race for that starting spot with Morris and Speight chomping at the bit and Devin Gardner being put under a lot of pressure.

Jake, Chicago: What are the chances Michigan can beat Ohio State?

A: Ohio State has the better, more consistent team. Is it possible that Michigan can win? Yes, it is possible. But the current Michigan pass rush isn’t going to faze Braxton Miller too much. The current run defense isn’t going to be the most difficult Carlos Hyde has seen. And the secondary needs to play its best coverage of the season in order to not allow Miller to make his throws. On the other side of the ball, the Buckeyes will likely throw a similar blitz scheme against the Wolverines as did the Spartans, and they’ll do their best to get after Gardner on every single down. And though the run game looked improved last week, Smith and Green (or Fitzgerald Toussaint) will have to play their best games of the year. If all that goes well, then yes, Michigan could win. Would it be the biggest outlier performance of the season? Yes, yes it would.

B Hugh via Twitter: How many snaps would one expect Taco Charlton to receive for the rest of the year?

A: I think we’ll see him for more snaps over the next two games. Defensive coordinator Greg Mattison seems very high on his progress, and Frank Clark has kind of taken Charlton under his wing. On Tuesday, Mattison said Charlton is no longer playing like a freshman, so with the rotation up front and that kind of trust in Charlton, I think Mattison might try to mix him in a bit more.

Sam, DC: *Did Michigan gain or lose fair-weather fans by their overtime win at NU,?

A: Well, I suppose that depends on the definition of fair-weather fans. I feel like Michigan fans are huge fans and that even when they’re upset, they’re still loyal. However, if we’re talking about fans on the periphery who might tune in Saturday because of what they saw last week, then maybe there are a few. Obviously, a win helps (and Northwestern is better than its Big Ten record implies). However, even more so than the win, Drew Dileo's slide into the hold (#DileoPowerSlide was trending among Michigan fans, I believe) brought some eyes to the game. Any time you have a play like that, it draws people.

Big Ten weekend rewind: Week 12

November, 18, 2013
11/18/13
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Twelve seconds.

That's how much time remained in regulation at Northwestern after Michigan quarterback Devin Gardner hit Jeremy Gallon on a 16-yard pass. The clock was running. What happened next was what Wolverines coach Brady Hoke said "might be the best single play I've ever seen."

The Michigan field goal unit sprinted onto the field. Holder Drew Dileo, who had run a pattern as a wide receiver, ran in from the other side of the field and slid into position. The snap came with one second to go, and kicker Brendan Gibbons made a 44-yarder to send the game into overtime, where the Wolverines eventually won.

Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald was upset that his team didn't get a chance to substitute its block team in. The Wildcats were in disarray as the field goal try went up. Referee Bill LeMonnier explained to a pool reporter afterward that on the final play of the half, teams aren't automatically given the right to substitute on field goal defense.

That play goes down as the second-craziest finish to regulation of a Big Ten game this year. In the Wisconsin-Arizona State game, there were 18 seconds left when Joel Stave downed the ball. The Badgers never got to run another play.

Take that and rewind it back ...

[+] EnlargeMark Dantonio
Bruce Thorson/USA TODAY SportsMark Dantonio and the Spartans control their own destiny to reach the Big Ten title game.
Team of the week: Michigan State. It was not a vintage defensive performance for the Spartans, who allowed 28 points to a Nebraska offense that turned the ball over five times and played with a stitched-together line. But Mark Dantonio's team still won by double digits on the road in Lincoln for its first win over the Huskers while clinching at least a share of the Legends Division title. Then there's this: Through 10 games, the Spartans are averaging 30.9 points per contest.

Worst hangover: Northwestern finds more ways to lose than anybody. The Wildcats had a dominant defensive effort against Michigan in allowing no touchdowns in regulation. But they had a 7-yard shank punt that set up a Michigan first-and-goal, Ibraheim Campbell dropped an easy interception on the Wolverines' final drive, and they couldn't pounce on a fumble in overtime. Northwestern has lost twice in overtime, once on a Hail Mary and in games that went down to the final drives against Minnesota and Ohio State. Sheesh.

Best call: Nebraska had to be ready for some Michigan State tomfoolery, right? We've seen it so many times from Dantonio in a big game.

And it worked again on Saturday. The Spartans lined up for a field goal on fourth-and-1 from the Nebraska 27, leading 27-21 in the fourth quarter. Punter Mike Sadler, who serves as the holder on field goals, took the snap and pushed his way forward for 3 yards. The play was called "Charlie Brown," evoking memories of Lucy snatching the ball away in "Peanuts." But Sadler was actually supposed to check out of the play because of the way Nebraska was set up, and the play was never designed to go up the middle where he ran.

"That was the last thing going through my mind," said Sadler, who went up the middle on a successful punt fake at Iowa last month. "I was just trying to think of my touchdown dance."

He didn't score, but Connor Cook delivered a touchdown pass three plays later to all but seal the victory.

Big Man on Campus (Offense): Ohio State running back Carlos Hyde piled up five total touchdowns while rushing for 246 yards on just 24 carries versus Illinois. He had touchdown runs of 51 and 55 yards in the final four minutes to put the game on ice.

Big Man on Campus (Defense): In a game that didn't feature a whole lot of defense, Ohio State's Ryan Shazier still managed an impressive stat line at Illinois: 16 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks and a forced fumble. He had the safety on Reilly O'Toole that gave the Buckeyes some breathing room. And while he had a chance to turn that into a touchdown had he not celebrated a bit too soon, Shazier still had an outstanding performance considering Ohio State's other two starting linebackers were out with injuries.

[+] EnlargeBrendan Gibbons
AP Photo/Nam Y. HuhBrendan Gibbons hit a 44-yard field goal as time expired to put Michigan into overtime at Northwestern.
Big Men on Campus (Special teams): This goes to the entire Michigan field goal unit, including Gibbons, Dileo, snapper Jareth Glanda, special-teams coordinator Dan Ferrigno and everyone else involved in that unbelievable play at the end of regulation at Northwestern. That was a team effort, and if one guy was a half-second late, the Wolverines lose. (Tips of the cap also go out to Purdue's Raheem Mostert and Illinois' V'Angelo Bentley, who both scored on returns).

Sideline interference: Illinois coach Tim Beckman had to be separated from offensive coordinator Bill Cubit on the sidelines after quarterback Reilly O'Toole was sacked in the end zone. Both coaches later said it was just a heat-of-the-moment thing, and Cubit added, "You'd be shocked at how many times" that happens during games. But it's still not a good look for Beckman, whose sideline mishaps the past two years include getting called for interference penalties and getting caught using chewing tobacco.

Who needs tickets?: Want to see a Big Ten game, but you don't have more than 50 cents in your pocket? Then this week's Illinois-Purdue Basement Bowl is for you. On StubHub this morning, several tickets to Saturday's game at Ross-Ade Stadium could be had for as little as 39 cents. Get 'em while they're hot!

Fun with numbers (via ESPN Stats & Info):

  • Wisconsin ran for 554 yards Saturday versus Indiana. It was the second most in school history, behind the 564 the Badgers compiled against the Hoosiers last year. So in the past two games against IU, Wisconsin has rushed for 1,118 yards and 13 touchdowns; on Saturday the Badgers had three 100-yard rushers (James White, Melvin Gordon and Corey Clement) and an 86-yard rusher (Jared Abbrederis, on reverses). The Badgers' running game added 35.8 expected points to their net scoring margin; two of the top 10 rushing EPA games in the FBS the past 10 years were posted by Wisconsin against Indiana. The Badgers still fell far short of the Big Ten rushing record of 832 yards, set by Minnesota in 1905. But they do get Indiana again next year, so you never know.

  • ESPN's strength of schedule rankings (out of 126 FBS teams):
Alabama: 48th
Florida State: 60th
Ohio State: 88th
Baylor: 95th

Week 12 helmet stickers

November, 17, 2013
11/17/13
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Michigan got out of Evanston, Ill. with a win. It just took three overtimes. Here are three guys/groups who made that win possible.

Kicker Brendan Gibbons and holder Drew Dileo. The Wolverines somehow managed to be coordinated enough to get their offense on the sideline, their kicking team in position and everything in place as the clock was expiring so Gibbons could hit the 44-yard field goal to send the game into overtime. The serendipitous part is that because Gibbons is left-footed and Dileo had been on the field for the offensive play the down before, Dileo didn't need to slide in front of Gibbons for the set up. If Gibbons had been right-footed or if Michigan's sideline had been the opposite one, Dileo would've needed to get to the other side of Gibbons' body and reset, which could've taken more time.

The run game. Hello, Derrick Green and De'Veon Smith. With Fitzgerald Toussaint sidelined with an injury according to Brady Hoke, Michigan went with youth in the run game and it paid off. The Wolverines accounted for 139 rushing yards and the offensive line actually helped create that for the two young guns. Green carried the ball 19 times for 84 yards, while Smith carried the ball eight times for 41 yards (no negative rushing yards).

Overtime Devin Gardner. It wasn't the most solid game of his career, but in overtime, when he needed to step up, he did. Gardner was 4-of-6 for 24 yards and one touchdown while rushing for 19 yards and another touchdown on three carries. The Wolverines have made it clear that they will stick with Gardner at QB, despite fans sometimes calling for freshman Shane Morris. The poise Gardner showed late in the game and in overtime was that of a redshirt junior.

Big Ten helmet stickers: Week 12

November, 17, 2013
11/17/13
9:00
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Recognizing the best and the brightest around the Big Ten in week 12 …

Ohio State RB Carlos Hyde. Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said that Hyde made the difference for the Buckeyes in a 60-35 win. The senior rushed for four touchdowns and 246 yards on 24 carries and tallied another receiving touchdown (he had two catches totaling 26 yards). It was Hyde’s first 200-yard game of the season and more than double his previous season average of 117 yards per game.

Michigan kicker Brendan Gibbons and holder Drew Dileo. Down three points with under 10 seconds remaining in regulation, the Michigan offense was sprinting off the field, the kicking team sprinting on the field and Dileo was sliding in to this holding position for Gibbons (yes, literally, sliding). Gibbons nailed a 44-yard field goal to send the game in to overtime, which the Wolverines eventually won after triple OT.

Wisconsin running backs. The Badgers accounted for 554 rushing yards against Indiana. James White (205 yards, 1 touchdown), Melvin Gordon (146 yards, 1 touchdown) and Corey Clement (108 yards, 2 touchdowns) became Wisconsin's third 100-yard rushing trio this season. Wisconsin tallied seven runs of 30 yards or more and White recorded a 93-yard touchdown run which set a program record for the longest run. The Badgers' 554 rush yards are the most by an FBS team this season.

Nebraska RB Ameer Abdullah. The Big Ten’s leading rusher had his seventh 100-yard game of the season (bringing his rushing total this season to 1,213) and he became the first running back to rush for more than 100 yards against the Spartans defense. He accounted for 123 yards on 22 carries and his one TD of the day was a 12-yard receiving touchdown (his only catch of the day). MSU came into the match up giving up just 43 rushing yards per game -- which Abdullah tripled.

Illinois DB V'Angelo Bentley. Coming into this weekend the Buckeyes had allowed just 1.5 yards per punt return and haven’t allowed any kind of a return on 92 percent of their punts. But with the Illini down 28-0 on Saturday Bentley managed to get past more than half of Ohio State’s punt coverage team and go 67 yards to the end zone. Not only did he become the first player to have success against this group, he also gave Illinois its first sign of life against the Buckeyes.

Honorable mention: Michigan State kicker Mike Sadler. With a six-point lead in the fourth quarter and the Spartans faced with a fourth-and-1 on the Cornhuskers 27 yard line, Mark Dantonio called for a fake field goal play. Sadler was supposed to go right, but the formation wasn’t quite what MSU expected, so instead of checking out of it and going for a field goal he rushed for three yards up the middle and a first down, setting up an MSU score.
The first bye week of Michigan’s season has come and gone, and we’ll see how much not playing last weekend will help the Wolverines in their homecoming game this weekend.

Here are five things to watch as Michigan gets back on the field tomorrow.

1. Devin Gardner bouncing back. Following the Notre Dame game, Heisman hype surrounded Gardner. Now he’s saying that he deserves the amount of recent criticism he has gotten from fans and the media. That’s quite the swing for anyone, even someone as confident and sure of himself as Gardner. He admitted he strayed from his technique in the Akron and Connecticut games. With a week off to take a step back, spend more time in the film room and work more on the basics, he could step on the field as an entirely new player ... or he could reappear as a turnover risk. However, with the combination of Gardner’s attitude and Minnesota’s defense, expect Gardner to take a few steps forward this game.

2. The new interior offensive line. The Wolverines’ offensive line was inexperienced and lacked chemistry. Now, at the very beginning of the Big Ten season, the Wolverines are changing it up and hoping for the best. Moving Graham Glasgow to center will give Michigan a slightly bigger presence on the inside, but again, they’ll be starting from scratch. He has started four games at left guard and has worked at center through practices but he has never had to direct the line and work with Gardner during game action -- let alone the Big Ten opener. Chris Bryant will likely pick up his first start at left guard, which is again, not the most promising scenario for Michigan. He has been dinged up with knee and shoulder issues and has only appeared in one game so far this season. Perhaps the Wolverines’ O-line will take a few steps forward against the Gophers, but expect the occasional step backward as well.

3. The defensive line moving on up. The Wolverines showed progress with their four-man rush against Connecticut, and with a bye week to get back to the basics (which Greg Mattison had said they needed) as well as time to work together, expect them to continue their movement against Minnesota. They’re going to continue to funnel and shuffle guys through, but we’re still waiting on Frank Clark, while he has been impressive, to have his coming-out party. Saturday seems like a perfect time for that to happen.

4. A possible role change with Devin Funchess. The Wolverines haven’t had a consistent downfield threat this season. At times, Joe Reynolds has shown promise and Jeremy Jackson has shown potential, but that hasn’t exactly resulted in big gains. With Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo as Gardner’s current safety nets, it makes sense for Michigan to try something out, like moving Funchess into more of a receiving role down the field. He has tons of pro potential and has always been a better pass catcher than blocker, so don’t be too surprised if you see him line up as a wide receiver against the Gophers.

5. Run game, fun game. The best the run game has looked was against Connecticut, but even so, it wasn’t the way Michigan wants it to be. This week Brady Hoke said that he might give Fitzgerald Toussaint (5-foot-10, 200 pounds) a few less carries from here on out just to mix things up and to get different players/bodies out there. So if you see Derrick Green (5-foot-11, 240 pounds) and De'Veon Smith (5-foot-11, 224 pounds) out there this weekend, don’t be too surprised. And if this sparks the Wolverines run game, be even less surprised.
The Big Ten season is here. The Little Brown Jug (which really isn’t “little”) is being brought out of storage. And Brady Hoke is looking to stay undefeated in the Big House.

There’s lots to talk about. As always, send your questions in (@chanteljennings, jenningsESPN@gmail.com). I’m here every Wednesday.

John Babri, Kentucky: With the way the Wolverines looked in their last two games is there any hope for them in The Game?

A: Well, if Michigan plays like it did against Akron and Connecticut when Ohio State comes to town at the end of November, the Wolverines will get embarrassed. However, with that game, nothing really matters as far as stats and records. I would imagine that both teams will bring their A game and assuming Michigan’s offensive line can pull it together and protect Devin Gardner while also opening some holes for Fitzgerald Toussaint, then good things could happen. However, if we’re still discussing offensive line depth/chemistry/whatnot in November, that will be a very, very bad sign for Michigan.

@SahamSports via Twitter: Where does the responsibility of the early struggles lie on Hoke, [Taylor] Lewan and leadership, Devin [Gardner], etc.?

A: All the above … and some. The answer is never just one thing. I think you have some youth at key positions (interior offense line, wide receivers outside of Drew Dileo and Jeremy Gallon, quarterback -- yes, he only has a handful of starts). Add to that how the Wolverines didn’t prepare well for Akron and then maybe overprepared and overthought UConn and you’ve got a recipe for disaster. And it’s not as if Michigan’s offense is built to completely avoid turnovers. The Wolverines are relying on high-risk, high-reward plays because of some of that youth, and of late it hasn’t paid off.

Jerry Mead, via Twitter: Are we going to see more Derrick Green?

A: On Monday, Hoke said that he would like to lessen Toussaint’s load by giving Green and freshman De’Veon Smith some carries. That kind of an answer would benefit the Wolverines in multiple ways. For starters, it gives Toussaint a bit more of a rest through the game and season. But Green and Smith are built differently than each other and Toussaint, so it changes things up for defenses a bit when the Wolverines can shuffle different guys in there. With how effective Iowa was with the run last weekend against Minnesota, there’s a pretty good idea of what you need to do against the Gophers to get the run game going. If Michigan can open holes as well as the Iowa offensive line did against Minnesota, then I think we will see all three guys with some pretty impressive runs.

Mike Ziemke, Chicago: Do you think it's possible we'll have two redshirt freshman and three redshirt sophomores as our starting O-line next season?

A: I highly doubt that. I think Ben Braden will step in at right tackle and Erik Magnuson will come in for Taylor Lewan at left tackle, so that gives you two redshirt sophomores. Add to that Kyle Kalis, who I believe will keep his job at right guard -- so then you have three. The center and left guard positions will be interesting and we could learn a lot about those this weekend. At left guard, I think we’ll see more Graham Glasgow and Chris Bryant, which would be a redshirt junior. Center will be the most interesting because you’ll either have Glasgow, Jack Miller, Joey Burzynski (who’d be a redshirt senior) or redshirt freshman Patrick Kugler, which would be an interesting situation.
Home sweet home. At least it has been for Michigan under Brady Hoke.

The 11th-ranked Wolverines are 16-0 in Michigan Stadium with Hoke as coach. It's the longest active home winning streak among BCS conference schools.

Hoke said he really didn’t have much of an explanation for that, other than the fact that “players play hard at home.”

Last weekend the Wolverines took down Notre Dame at home in front of an all-time attendance record for college football or the NFL: 115,109. Though the crowd will likely not be as large on Saturday -- nor is it likely that will Beyonce make a guest appearance on the big screens at halftime -- Michigan will look to close out its 2013-14 nonconference home schedule with a win over Akron.

The Zips are 1-1 and are currently on a 27-game road losing streak.

“It’s the will to win at home,” senior receiver Drew Dileo said on Monday. “We’re trying to defend this place, defend the Big House. That’s what we’ve been doing the last couple years and this year.”

So far this season, Michigan fans have seen two pretty impressive performances from redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner. On the ground, Gardner has scored three times and rushed for 134 yards on 20 carries. He has completed 31-of-48 passes for five touchdowns and nearly 500 yards in the air.

His top target this season has been senior receiver Jeremy Gallon. The 5-foot-8 senior leads the Wolverines with four touchdown catches and has 12 receptions overall.

Michigan’s defense has also looked stout in the Big House, though defensive coordinator Greg Mattison would like to see more out of the front seven as well as more consistency in the secondary.

The Wolverines will look to improve their record to 3-0 at home this season before traveling to Connecticut next weekend. During the Big Ten portion of the schedule, the Wolverines will host four teams at Michigan Stadium, including Nebraska and Ohio State.
Two weeks in and the No. 11 Michigan football team is 2-0. With a relatively easy few weeks, the Wolverines could be headed into their matchup at Penn State with a 5-0 record. It’s shaping up to be quite the season, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t questions. We do the mailbag every Wednesday, so make sure you get your questions in early and often (Twitter: @chanteljennings, email: jenningsespn@gmail.com) for the chance to see them here.

[+] EnlargeGraham
Eric Bronson/Icon SMIHow good would Michigan's defense look if it could put Brandon Graham in the lineup again?
1. Jacob Mangum, Tampa, Florida: What former U-M player would you bring back to play on this year's defense and why?

A: I think the obvious choice here is Charles Woodson. Why wouldn’t you bring him back? He’s the only defensive player who has ever won the Heisman, and the Wolverines’ secondary could use a playmaker like him. I can only imagine what Greg Mattison would do with this defense if he had a cornerback like Woodson. However, if we’re talking someone who’s more recent to the program, I’d maybe pick Brandon Graham or another defensive lineman to help up front as the Wolverines try to get more pressure on opposing quarterbacks. At Michigan, Graham recorded 56 tackles for a loss, including 29.5 sacks. His athleticism up front would pick up the defensive line immediately.

2. David Weber, Burlington, Ontario: What was the impact of the game, atmosphere on the recruits that were on hand Saturday? What are you hearing?

A: I spoke with our Big Ten recruiting reporter Tom VanHaaren, and he has heard only good things. I mean, seriously, how many of the 115,000 plus fans there were ready to commit after that game? The football was impressive, and that’s a huge takeaway, but it’s also important to consider everything around the football. The experience as a whole was totally unique and something I don’t see other programs matching. As the recruits walked in to the stadium through the tunnel, they had people waiting to high five them the entire way to their seats. Add on to that the flyover, the halftime show (complete with a personalized message to Michigan from Beyoncé), the flashing lights and the whole feel of the evening.

3. Bhugh215 via Twitter: Obviously Gardner will be receiving some serious Heisman recognition, but at what point do we pull him versus Akron?

A: Akron has lost 27 consecutive games on the road, and they allowed 498 yards of offense last weekend to James Madison. Suffice it to say the Wolverines should be putting up huge numbers this weekend. Michigan pulled quarterback Devin Gardner with a 43-point lead over Central Michigan in its season opener, and I’d imagine they’d do something similar this week, though maybe something more in the range of 35 or so. The scary thought, though, is that the Wolverines realistically could get that kind of a lead before halftime, especially if Jeremy Gallon, Drew Dileo and Fitzgerald Toussaint are firing on all cylinders. I think it’s even possible they could pull back-up quarterback Shane Morris at some point later in the game to allow third-string QB Brian Cleary the chance to get some game snaps, as well.

4. Ryan Massengill via Twitter: Iowa, Indiana, and Purdue have non-conference losses unfortunately, will we see any more non-conference losses in B1G Ten?

A: Not from Michigan, but across the conference as a whole, I think we absolutely will. In Week 3, Purdue has a night game against No. 21 Notre Dame; No. 23 Nebraska hosts No. 16 UCLA; No. 20 Wisconsin travels to Arizona State; and Illinois hosts No. 19 Washington. In Week 4, Michigan State travels to Notre Dame. The Spartans defense probably will be able to give Tommy Rees a few issues, but the Irish defense will do the same (if not more) to Michigan State’s quarterback. And a week later Purdue will face an impressive Northern Illinois team that already took down one Big Ten opponent in Iowa.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- If there’s anything this game has taught us recently it’s that it’s not over until the clock reads zeros. No. 17 Michigan held a 14-point advantage over No. 14 Notre Dame heading in to the fourth quarter but fate wouldn’t let that stand. How could it when the Wolverines would need to one-up the fourth quarter from two years ago under the lights?

But even with some really poor decisions and a few clutch plays made on offense and defense, Michigan was able to pull off the win over Notre Dame, 41-30. The victory keeps Michigan coach Brady Hoke undefeated in Michigan Stadium in his third year at the helm of the Wolverines.

It was over when: In most instances, an 11-point lead with less than five minutes remaining would feel pretty safe. But nothing really felt safe for the Wolverines -- especially against this Notre Dame team -- until Blake Countess intercepted a tipped pass in the end zone with 1:29 remaining in the game.

Game ball goes to: Jeremy Gallon. The wide receiver made catch after catch that he was seemingly too short or too covered to make. His three touchdowns on eight receptions, however, led the Wolverines, and his 184 yards were a career high. With quarterback Devin Gardner at the helm of this Michigan offense, it is allowing playmakers like Gallon to really come in to their own, and the senior's performance against the Irish showed just that.

Stat of the game: Louis Nix III recorded just four tackles and two of them (including the one for a loss) came when the game was already out of hand. Not once did Notre Dame’s stud defensive lineman -- who was going up against three interior offensive linemen from Michigan who all saw their first starts just a week ago -- get to Gardner.

Unsung hero: Fitzgerald Toussaint. Because of the nature of Gallon’s big performance, Toussaint’s 71 yards on 22 carries will largely go unnoticed. However, it is because of his ability to get short yardage and hit holes that the passing lanes were open for guys like Gallon, Drew Dileo and Devin Funchess. Offensive coordinator Al Borges has always said he wants a featured back in his offense and 22 carries is within their desired range.

Second-guessing: A safety isn’t the worst possible thing. And no, it’s not ideal either. But the only thing worse would be exactly what Gardner did -- incidentally throwing it to the other team as three Irish defenders closed in on him. It was a huge dent on a game that was relatively empty of errors on the quarterback’s part. But that play completely shifted the momentum of the game and what could’ve been a small dent in the game turned this game into the dogfight that it became.

Dig of the game: Michigan Stadium played “The Chicken Dance” following the win, which is a reference back to last May when Hoke said that Notre Dame was chickening out of the rivalry.

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