Michigan Wolverines: Deion Barnes

Big Ten lunch links

July, 25, 2014
Jul 25
12:00
PM ET
The Big Ten season unofficially begins Monday with media days. So enjoy the weekend, and then let's get after it.
Last week, we took a look at some notable offensive milestones -- 3,000 yards passing, 1,000 yards rushing and 1,000 yards receiving -- and which players in the Big Ten were most likely to reach them. Now, let's turn to the defensive side of the ball and examine which players might get to another impressive plateau: 10 sacks.

[+] EnlargeJoey Bosa
Andrew Weber/USA TODAY SportsOhio State's Joey Bosa is poised to become one of the Big Ten's fiercest pass rushers.
In light of those quadruple-digit offensive numbers, 10 might seem like a modest goal for sacks. But only one Big Ten player made it there last season -- Nebraska's Randy Gregory, whom we correctly pegged as a possibility last summer -- and none did in 2012. Only 20 players in the FBS finished in double digits in sacks last season. So it's not easy.

But there are a handful of players in the league who have the ability and opportunity to register 10 or more sacks in 2014. They are:

  • Randy Gregory, Nebraska (10.5 sacks in 2013): The physically imposing Huskers defensive end could cause even more damage now that he has a full season of FBS competition under his belt. There's a reason some are projecting him as top-10 NFL draft pick next spring.
  • Joey Bosa, Ohio State (7.5): Bosa burst onto the scene as a true freshman, finishing with 7.5 sacks. His freakish combination of strength and speed could help him achieve true superstar status as a sophomore. Also watch out for Buckeyes teammate Noah Spence, who had eight sacks a year ago but will miss the first two games of the year because of a suspension. It will be extremely difficult for opponents to double-team the two defensive ends once Spence comes back.
  • Andre Monroe, Maryland (9.5): We have to rank the Terps senior this high because he very nearly recorded 10 sacks last season in the ACC. The self-proclaimed fireball aims to burn Big Ten offensive lines this fall.
  • Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State (7.5): The Big Ten's defensive lineman of the year became known for his early season scoring prowess and was a fearsome pass rusher. But despite having a great year over 14 games, he still finished well shy of 10 sacks. Shows you how hard it is to get there.
  • Theiren Cockran, Minnesota (7.5): Somewhat quietly, Cockran was one of the leading sack artists in the league a year ago. He's long and quick off the edge. He won't have Ra'Shede Hageman inside to take away attention, but Cockran has shown that he can do damage by himself.
  • C.J. Olaniyan, Penn State (5): It's hard to block the 6-foot-3, 245-pound Nittany Lions senior, who led the team in quarterback takedowns a year ago. Of course, we also have to mention Deion Barnes, who had six sacks in 2012 en route to Big Ten freshman of the year honors but slipped to just two in a disappointing 2013. Can Barnes bounce back?
  • Frank Clark, Michigan (4.5): Clark didn't quite have the monster breakout year some predicted for him in 2013, but he was very solid with 12 tackles for loss. He's got enough skill and experience to improve those numbers for a Wolverines defense that aims to pressure opposing passers a lot more this year. Perhaps a healthy Jake Ryan, who had 4.5 sacks in 2012 but none in an injury-shortened season last fall, also could make some noise in this category.

 
We're taking snapshots of each position group with each Big Ten team entering the spring. Up next: the defensive lines.

Illinois: This is a significant concern for the Illini, especially after the recent departure of Houston Bates, who started last season at the Leo (defensive end/outside linebacker) spot. Illinois also loses its other starting defensive end, Tim Kynard. The team will rely heavily on junior-college players such as Jihad Ward and Joe Fotu, but it also needs holdovers like Dawuane Smoot and Paul James III to step up on the perimeter. Illinois returns more experience inside with Austin Teitsma and Teko Powell, but there should be plenty of competition, especially with the juco arrivals, after finishing 116th nationally against the run.

Indiana: The anticipated move to a 3-4 alignment under new coordinator Brian Knorr creates a different dynamic for the line this spring. Indiana must identify options at the all-important nose tackle spot, and possibilities include sophomores Ralphael Green and Darius Latham, both of whom are big bodies. Nick Mangieri had a nice sophomore season and should be in the mix for a starting job on the perimeter (end or outside linebacker), while David Kenney could be a good fit as a 3-4 end. Defensive end Ryan Phillis is the team's most experienced lineman, and Zack Shaw also has some starting experience.

Iowa: This group should be the strength of the defense as Iowa returns three full-time starters -- tackles Carl Davis and Louis Trinca-Pasat, and end Drew Ott -- as well as Mike Hardy, who started the second half of the season opposite Ott. End Dominic Alvis departs, but Iowa brings back almost everyone else from a line that allowed only eight rushing touchdowns in 2013. Junior Darian Cooper could have a bigger role and push for more playing time inside, and Nate Meier provides some depth on the perimeter after recording two sacks in 2013. Iowa is in good shape here.

Maryland: The Terrapins employ a 3-4 scheme and appear to be in good shape up front, as reserve Zeke Riser is the only rotation player to depart. Andre Monroe leads the way at defensive end after an excellent junior season in which he led Maryland in both sacks (9.5) and tackles for loss (17). Quinton Jefferson started at defensive end last season and recorded three sacks. There should be some good competition this spring at nose tackle between Keith Bowers and Darius Kilgo, both of whom had more than 30 tackles last season. The challenge is building greater depth with players such as end Roman Braglio.

Michigan: If the Wolverines intend to make a big step in 2014, they'll need more from the front four, which didn't impact games nearly enough last fall. Michigan's strength appears to be on the edges as veteran Frank Clark returns after starting every game in 2013 and recording a team-high 12 tackles for loss. Brennen Beyer, who started the second half of last season, is back at the other end spot, and Michigan has depth with Mario Ojemudia and Taco Charlton. There are more questions inside as Willie Henry, Chris Wormley and others compete for the starting job. Young tackles such as Henry Poggi and Maurice Hurst Jr. also are in the mix, and Ondre Pipkins should be a factor when he recovers from ACL surgery.

Michigan State: The Spartans return the best defensive end tandem in the league as Shilique Calhoun, a second-team All-American in 2013, returns alongside Marcus Rush, one of the Big Ten's most experienced defenders. Joel Heath, Brandon Clemons and others provide some depth on the perimeter. It's a different story inside as MSU loses both starters (Micajah Reynolds and Tyler Hoover), as well as reserve Mark Scarpinato. Damon Knox, James Kittredge and Lawrence Thomas, who has played on both sides of the ball, are among those who will compete for the starting tackle spots. If Malik McDowell signs with MSU, he could work his way into the rotation.

Minnesota: Defensive tackles like Ra'Shede Hageman don't come around every year, and he leaves a big void in the middle of Minnesota's line. The Gophers will look to several players to replace Hageman's production, including senior Cameron Botticelli, who started opposite Hageman last season. Other options at tackle include Scott Ekpe and Harold Legania, a big body at 308 pounds. Minnesota is in much better shape at end with Theiren Cockran, arguably the Big Ten's most underrated defensive lineman. Cockran and Michael Amaefula both started every game last season, and Alex Keith provides another solid option after recording five tackles for loss in 2013.

Nebraska: Other than MSU's Calhoun, Nebraska returns the most dynamic defensive lineman in the league in Randy Gregory, who earned first-team All-Big Ten honors in his first FBS season. If the Huskers can build around Gregory, they should be very stout up front this fall. Nebraska won't have Avery Moss, suspended for the 2014 season, and players such as Greg McMullen and junior-college transfer Joe Keels will compete to start opposite Gregory. The competition inside should be fascinating as junior Aaron Curry and sophomore Vincent Valentine both have starting experience, but Maliek Collins came on strong at the end of his first season and will push for a top job.

Northwestern: It will be tough to get a clear picture of this group in the spring because of several postseason surgeries, but Northwestern should be fine at defensive end despite the loss of Tyler Scott. Dean Lowry, Ifeadi Odenigbo and Deonte Gibson all have significant experience and the ability to pressure quarterbacks. Odenigbo, who had 5.5 sacks as a redshirt freshman, could become a star. The bigger questions are inside as Northwestern must build depth. Sean McEvilly is a solid option but must stay healthy. Chance Carter and Max Chapman are among those competing for starting jobs at tackle.

Ohio State: A total mystery last spring, the defensive line should be one of Ohio State's strengths in 2014. Noah Spence and Joey Bosa could become the Big Ten's top pass-rushing tandem, and the Buckeyes have depth there with Jamal Marcus, Adolphus Washington and others. Returning starter Michael Bennett is back at defensive tackle, and while Joel Hale might move to offense, there should be enough depth inside with Tommy Schutt, Chris Carter and Washington, who could slide inside. Nose tackle is the only question mark, but new line coach Larry Johnson inherits a lot of talent.

Penn State: Like the rest of the Lions defense, the line struggled at times last season and now much replace its top player in tackle DaQuan Jones. The new coaching staff has some potentially good pieces, namely defensive end Deion Barnes, who won 2012 Big Ten Freshman of the Year honors but slumped as a sophomore. Barnes and C.J. Olaniyan could form a dangerous pass-rushing tandem, but they'll need support on the inside, where there should be plenty of competition. Austin Johnson will be in the mix for a starting tackle spot, and early enrollees Tarow Barney and Antoine White also should push for time. Anthony Zettel provides some depth on the perimeter.

Purdue: The line endured a tough 2013 campaign and loses two full-time starters (tackle Bruce Gaston Jr. and end Greg Latta), and a part-time starter (end Ryan Isaac). Competition should be ramped up at all four spots this spring. Senior end Ryan Russell is the most experienced member of the group must take a step this offseason. Evan Panfil and Jalani Phillips will push for time at the end spots, along with Kentucky transfer Langston Newton. The group at tackle includes Ryan Watson and Michael Rouse III, both of whom started games in 2013.

Rutgers: Keep a close eye on this group in the spring as Rutgers begins the transition to the Big Ten. The Scarlet Knights lose two starters in end Marcus Thompson and tackle Isaac Holmes, as well as contributor Jamil Merrell at tackle. Darius Hamilton provides a building block on the inside after recording 4.5 sacks and 11.5 tackles for loss in 2013, and end Djwany Mera is back after starting throughout last season. David Milewski played tackle last year, but both he and Hamilton likely need to add weight for their new league. Rutgers has some talent in the younger classes and needs players such as Sebastian Joseph, Kemoko Turay and Julian Pinnix-Odrick to emerge.

Wisconsin: Linebacker Chris Borland is the biggest single departure for the Badgers' defense, but the no position group loses more than the line. Wisconsin must replace several mainstays, most notably nose tackle Beau Allen, who performed well in the first year of the 3-4 set under coordinator Dave Aranda. Senior Warren Herring will step in for Allen after three years as a reserve. Konrad Zagzebski is a good bet to fill one of the end spots, but there will be plenty of competition with players such as Jake Keefer, James Adeyanju, Arthur Goldberg and Chikwe Obasih.
Tags:

Maryland Terrapins, Michigan Wolverines, Big Ten Conference, Illinois Fighting Illini, Indiana Hoosiers, Iowa Hawkeyes, Minnesota Golden Gophers, Nebraska Cornhuskers, Northwestern Wildcats, Ohio State Buckeyes, Penn State Nittany Lions, Purdue Boilermakers, Wisconsin Badgers, Michigan State Spartans, Rutgers Scarlet Knights, Marcus Rush, Adolphus Washington, Ifeadi Odenigbo, Noah Spence, Ryan Russell, Larry Johnson, Darius Latham, Chikwe Obasih, Malik McDowell, Anthony Zettel, Deion Barnes, Louis Trinca-Pasat, Tyler Scott, Evan Panfil, Tommy Schutt, Chris Carter, Dave Aranda, Randy Gregory, Ra'Shede Hageman, Antoine White, Tim Kynard, Shilique Calhoun, Mark Scarpinato, Aaron Curry, Ryan Isaac, Michael Rouse III, Carl Davis, Vincent Valentine, Sean McEvilly, DaQuan Jones, Bruce Gaston Jr., Nick Mangieri, Theiren Cockran, Avery Moss, Beau Allen, Greg McMullen, Teko Powell, Lawrence Thomas, Tyler Hoover, Tarow Barney, David Kenney, Ralphael Green, Jihad Ward, Micajah Reynolds, Langston Newton, C.J. Olaniyan, Paul James, B1G spring positions 14, Alex Keith, Andre Monroe, Arthur Goldberg, Austin Teitsma, Cameron Botticelli, Chance Carter, Damon Knox, Darian Cooper, Darius Kilgo, David Milewski, Dawuane Smoot, Dean Lowry, Deonte Gibson, Djwany Mera, Dominic Alvis, Greg Latta, Harold Legania, Houston Bates, Isaac Holmes, Jake Keefer, Jalani Phillips, Jamal Marcus, James Adeyanju, James Kittredge, Jamil Merrell, Julian Pinnix-Odrick, Keith Bowers, Kemoko Turay, Konrad Zagzebski, Maliek Collins, Marcus Thompson, Max Chapman, Michael Amaefula, Nate Meier, Quinton Jefferson, Roman Braglio, Ryan Phillis, Ryan Watson, Scott Ekpe, Sebastian Joseph, Warren Herring

Big Ten Friday mailblog

September, 20, 2013
9/20/13
4:30
PM ET
Week 4 is hours away. Follow us throughout the day on the blog for all your Big Ten coverage needs.

Don't forget: Twitter.

To the inbox ...

Mike K. from Boston writes: The list of host cities that ESPN reported as bidding for the 2016 and 2017 national championship games not so conspicuously was missing any Midwest representation. The B1G already is at a disadvantage with the decision to use bowl sites for the semifinals. There are plenty of viable Midwest host cities with indoor stadiums (Detroit, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Minneapolis). What gives?

Adam Rittenberg: Mike, I couldn't agree more, but we knew this was probably coming, at least for the first set of title games not played at existing bowl sites. Several of those indoor venues expressed interest in hosting the title game when I reached out to them this spring, but some of the organizing groups are focused more on bidding for other events, including Super Bowls. Indianapolis would be the most realistic possibility in Big Ten territory because of its tremendous track record of hosting major sporting events. But Indiana Sports Corp, which brings the events to Naptown, has said it won't bid on the initial set of college football title games. Colleague Brett McMurphy has reported Minneapolis could bid on the game. It would be a shame to have a national championship never take place in the Midwest, especially since there are some excellent indoor venues here.


Tim from Niamey, Niger, writes:Living where I do, I miss a lot, but last weekend it was certainly fun to read about Ohio State's backup QB doing what he did. Then I read all about how OSU needs to be starting Kenny Guiton over Braxton Miller? really? He played the 120 worst defense in the nation. Not exactly a difficult task when you have the running game OSU has. He did still make some very good throws and I think OSU is blessed to have two really good QBs. I am glad that our backup takes his role seriously to be prepared to go in and not miss a beat, but before we lift him high on this pedestal, let's not forget who he played against.

Adam Rittenberg: Tim, I couldn't agree more. Kenny Guiton deserves all the credit he's getting right now, and it's great to see how he has developed after being an extremely late addition to the Buckeyes' 2009 recruiting class. But I also don't understand the talk about Guiton replacing Miller after Miller returns from his knee injury. Another email I received suggested that Miller should redshirt the season. C'mon, people. I know Urban Meyer and his coaching staff understand what they have in Miller, and so do most Ohio State fans. He's an elite athlete and can be a better passer than he has shown. When the competition gets tougher, which it soon will, you want No. 5 in there. This all speaks to the fact that Ohio State has way more weapons on offense than it did last season, when Miller carried the unit for much of the season.


Mitch from East Lansing, Mich., writes: College football fans know that the B1G isn't exactly in the best shape right now. But you should realize that media members like you, who write full, front-page articles explaining how terrible the B1G is, aren't doing anyone any favors. There are still a lot of good teams in B1G who are either in the top 25 or close to it. Also the B1G is still very popular all over the country thanks to the huge alumni groups. Maybe if people actually stopped continuously saying that the B1G is so bad, then maybe the national perception wouldn't be so bad.

Adam Rittenberg: Sorry, Mitch, national perception doesn't work that way. It baffles me how six seasons into this gig, I'm still expected by some fans to "promote" the Big Ten or tell you how great it is. That's not my job. Perception is about performance, and the Big Ten for the most part hasn't performed well against other conferences in recent years, whether it's in regular-season games or bowls. Last Saturday provided an opportunity for the Big Ten to show it had turned a corner after a historically poor season. Instead, the league provided much of the same underwhelming results, and it would have been worse if Michigan had lost to Akron. When the Big Ten performs better on the field, its perception will improve and you'll see fewer columns like the one I wrote last week.


Thomas from State College, Pa., writes: Adam, I know it is WAY too early, but Penn State is looking like it will take home back-to-back freshman of the year awards. This can only help Bill O'Brien in recruiting, right? If this is the case, how long does it take for PSU to contend for the B1G title once the sanctions are over (IF BO'B stays?)

Adam Rittenberg: Thomas, it can't hurt. Wisconsin had back-to-back Big Ten freshmen of the year -- linebacker Chris Borland in 2009, running back James White in 2010 -- and Penn State certainly could do the same if quarterback Christian Hackenberg keeps it up. O'Brien can sell an NFL-style offense to recruits, as well as a chance to see the field early because of the roster situation. If you're an elite recruit, you could claim a starting role faster at Penn State than other programs because there are fewer players ahead of you. It's hard to project three or four years down the road, and I'm interested to see how the sanctions will impact Penn State the rest of this season and next, but I doubt it will take O'Brien long to put together a contender once the Lions are eligible again.


Not an ASU/Pac-12 Officiating Question from Madison, Wis., writes: Hey Adam, I know you and Brian have been swamped with Wisconsin-ASU questions, comments, and rants this week, but I have a different Badger question for you. Do you think that the Wisconsin loss* to ASU is a blessing in disguise? Let's be realistic here (which may be a little too much to ask from college football fans). My Badgers had no chance at a BCS title this season, so the best thing we could hope for is a Rose Bowl victory. I know that Ohio State is deservingly the favorite to win the Leaders Division, but in your opinion does what happened in Tempe give the Badgers a chip on their shoulder and a little extra edge to take with them into Columbus? I realize we have Purdue between now and then, but my thought is that the ASU game may have sparked a fire and awoken a monster from inside Camp Randall. Is this a legitimate thought? Or is it a delusional coping mechanism I'm using because drinking the wells of New Glarus dry has done little to ease the pain of last Saturday.

Adam Rittenberg: It's never a blessing to lose, especially the way Wisconsin did at Arizona State, but you're probably correct that the Badgers' realistic ceiling this season is another Big Ten title and a Rose Bowl appearance. The benefit of playing a game like Wisconsin did -- win or lose -- is the experience gained in traveling to a hostile environment and pushing a good opponent to the end of the game. Wisconsin won't be intimidated at Ohio Stadium, even though the Buckeyes are better than Arizona State. Wisconsin is a veteran team that has won some tough road games in the past, and players can draw on their experience in the desert, even though it didn't end well. We knew Wisconsin would be the older team in this matchup before the season, but the Badgers also have faced more adversity than Ohio State. It could help them as they attempt to pull off what would be considered a fairly big upset.


James from Wichita, Kan., writes:In regard to the Huskers, do you think the team could use this latest situation as a rallying cry for the rest of the season? Simplifying the offense should help, and by the time Northwestern rolls to town, the defense will have another month under their belt. We have seen how this team plays when there is an us-against-the-world mentality; maybe they can use this as fuel to power through conference play to finish the season 11-1 or 10-2. Thoughts?

Adam Rittenberg: That's what they have to do, James. Nebraska knew going into the season that November would be the make-or-break month, and it still is. Although Illinois and Minnesota could be tricky games next month, Nebraska enters a favorable stretch featuring two open weeks and no ranked opponents. This is definitely a time to regroup and clean up the problems on both sides of the ball. Nebraska needs Taylor Martinez to get healthy, and the defense must grow up a bit, especially up front. My concern is that the competition level goes up so much in November and stays there. Will Nebraska be ready? I have my doubts.


Chris P. from Clemson, S.C., writes: Is it possible that Michigan struggling against Akron improves their long-term outlook for the season? Of course, there are many red flags raised, but a positive is that this teaches them that not preparing can have dire consequences, no matter who they are playing. Now they will prepare fully for games against Minnesota and Iowa, whereas they may have brushed them off had they not learned their lesson this past weekend. I think barely beating Akron decreases their chance of a major upset later in the season.

Adam Rittenberg: Chris, you echo the hope of many Michigan fans after watching that debacle last week. Brian and I actually discussed this point, and he tends to think Michigan had its letdown game and should be OK going forward. And he/you might be right. I tend to think that Michigan, like a lot of younger teams, will have some great performances and some lackluster ones, looking at times like a team that might win a championship this year and, at other times, one that's a year or two away. There were too many problems in the Akron game to write it off as a one-time letdown. Michigan's defense has yet to impress, especially up front, and while linebacker Jake Ryan will provide a big boost when he returns, I wonder if the Wolverines have enough impact players on that side of the ball.

On offense, the turnovers are adding up for Devin Gardner, who has to improve his decision-making when the competition improves. And here's another troubling nugget from ESPN Stats & Information: "The Wolverines have had 34 rushing plays of zero or negative yards, the second-most among BCS automatic-qualifying schools. Michigan also has zero broken tackles on rushing plays this year, the only team in the Big Ten without one, and just 128 rush yards after contact, second-fewest among Big Ten teams."

Maybe Michigan had its hiccup game, but I can't dismiss some other issues with the Wolverines, a team that could win a Big Ten title this year but also one that could lose several games down the stretch.


Dan from Los Angeles writes: Please, I beg you, don't taunt AIRBHG. He is an angry, petty, vengeful deity.

Keith from Reverence, Iowa, writes: Adam,I enjoyed your article about Iowa's Mark Weisman, save one line where you tempted the AIRBHG. Know this: no mortal running back has escaped the AIRBHG (Shonn Greene is the exception; he was Herculean, and able to battle back to return and prove the follies of the AIRBHG). If the AIRBHG shows his wrath, I hold you entirely responsible retroactive to 9/17/13, at 5:30 ET.

Adam Rittenberg: Yikes. I should know better. The AIRBHG has seemed to be preoccupied lately, building His brand on social media and the like. At some point, He will be defeated, and I think it'll be this year. But I realize the perils of challenging Him, and for that, I am truly sorry.

Big Ten lunchtime links

September, 18, 2013
9/18/13
12:00
PM ET
I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords.

Diagnosing the Big Ten

September, 18, 2013
9/18/13
10:30
AM ET
The doctor is in. Three weeks into the 2013 season, it's my job to diagnose any ailments in the Big Ten. After last Saturday's results, it's not hard to find some.

Let's begin ...

What's ailing the Big Ten?

[+] EnlargeDeion Barnes
Bradley Leeb/USA TODAY SportsBig Ten defenses would get better with pass-rushers like Penn State's Deion Barnes getting more heat on opposing QBs.
Leaky defenses: Defense hasn't been the Big Ten's biggest problem in recent years, but there are some troubling signs this fall. Four teams are allowing more than 400 yards a game against mostly weak competition. Half of the league's teams are surrendering more than 250 passing yards a game. Only one Big Ten team (Michigan State) ranks in the top 40 nationally in sacks, and only one squad (Minnesota) ranks in the top 40 in tackles for loss. Minnesota end Theiren Cockran is the only Big Ten player with at least three sacks.

What's the cure?

Develop the pass rush: Certain position groups have gone downhill in the Big Ten in recent years, but the league has had no problems producing elite defensive linemen. More players need to emerge in the coming weeks to put some heat on opposing quarterbacks and help out some young defensive backs. I'm looking at you, Deion Barnes, Tyler Scott, Frank Clark and all of Wisconsin's down linemen (the team has only one sack, from linebacker Chris Borland).

And, now, for Part II ...

What's ailing the Big Ten?

Limited pass games: This is hardly a new problem for the Big Ten, which had only one team (Indiana) finish among the top 30 in pass offense last season. There has been a dearth of elite wide receivers throughout the Big Ten, which has been reflected in recent NFL drafts. While certain pass offenses have improved this fall -- Northwestern, Illinois, Michigan -- the league still has four teams averaging fewer than 200 pass yards per game. Minnesota has only 28 completions in three games.

What's the cure?

Develop No. 2 options at receiver: The No. 1 receivers around the Big Ten are pretty strong, from Penn State's Allen Robinson to Michigan's Jeremy Gallon, Nebraska's Kenny Bell to Wisconsin's Jared Abbrederis and Iowa's Kevonte Martin-Manley. But not enough teams have found second and third options early this season. The ones who have -- Indiana, Northwestern, Illinois -- are seeing good results through the air. It's important for teams like Iowa, Penn State and Wisconsin to find complementary pieces for the pass game.
Is it preseason All-America team season already? You bet it is.

Phil Steele has issued his 2013 preseason All-America teams, and a total of 15 players from the Big Ten made the four squads.

Let's take a look:

First team
Second team
Third team
Fourth team

Some notes and thoughts:
  • Lewan is an obvious choice for the first team, while Steele clearly sees the potential in Shazier and Roby after breakout seasons for the 12-0 Buckeyes in 2012. I don't see much separating Bullough from Shazier and Dennard from Roby, and wouldn't be surprised to see either Spartans defender moving up a team on the postseason All-America list.
  • Ohio State's Miller is listed behind only Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel and ahead of Alabama's A.J. McCarron and Louisville's Teddy Bridgewater. It's clear Miller will enter the season very much on the Heisman radar. Nebraska's Taylor Martinez didn't make the top four signal callers, but can't be too far behind.
  • Wisconsin's Pedersen is a solid player, but Penn State's Kyle Carter has the higher ceiling among Big Ten tight ends, in my view. Carter had 453 receiving yards in just nine games in 2012. He'll be a big help for Penn State's new starting quarterback, and could work his way onto the postseason All-America list.
  • It's not a huge snub, but Northwestern's Mark should be better than a fourth-team all-purpose player. He earned first-team All-America honors in 2012, and also was a second-team All-Big Ten selection as a running back. Mark could have worked his way onto the list as a running back. Instead, Steele went with former Penn State star Silas Redd as a fourth-teamer despite a so-so first season at USC. Mark's teammate Jeff Budzien also was snubbed from the kickers list after a near-perfect junior season.
  • Michigan linebacker Jake Ryan didn't make the preseason list despite an excellent 2012 season. Ryan suffered a torn ACL this spring, but is expected back before the end of October. It'll be interesting to see if other Wolverines players besides Lewan put themselves in contention for postseason All-America honors.
  • It's nice to see Steele recognize Wisconsin's Abbrederis, who might still be the Big Ten's top receiver. Like Pedersen, Abbrederis' numbers suffered in 2012 as Wisconsin sputtered on offense, and especially in the passing game. Abbrederis is an excellent route runner, a big-play threat, and a good return man.
  • I'm interested to see which Big Ten linemen work their way onto Steele's postseason All-America teams. Keep an eye on guys like Minnesota defensive tackle Ra'Shede Hageman, Penn State defensive end Deion Barnes, Wisconsin offensive lineman Ryan Groy, Northwestern defensive end Tyler Scott, Penn State guard John Urschel, and Ohio State's dynamic young pairing of defensive linemen Noah Spence and Adolphus Washington.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- While Michigan won’t see a ton of offensive stars in 2013, there is little question about the amount of elite defensive talent the Wolverines will face this season.

Six of the top defenders Michigan will play are in the top five of their respective positions for the 2014 NFL draft as rated by Mel Kiper Jr. The top three could all challenge to be drafted as high, if not higher, than Michigan star tackle Taylor Lewan next April as well.

It isn’t a surprise, either, that six of the 10 top defensive players Michigan will play come from the Wolverines’ three major rivals: Notre Dame, Ohio State and Michigan State.

Big Ten power rankings: Week 15

December, 5, 2012
12/05/12
10:15
AM ET
Only one Big Ten game took place since the last edition of the power rankings, but the surprising result left quite a conundrum.

How should we rank teams 2 through 6 after Wisconsin smashed Nebraska by 39 points in the Big Ten championship game? Wisconsin had a truly great night in Indy and looked like a different team than we've seen all season, but the Badgers still have more losses than Nebraska, Northwestern, Michigan and Penn State.

Oh, the decisions. In the end, this version of the power rankings takes into account the totality of the season. It's a little different from the weekly ones in that sense. Plus, we want to remain consistent with how we voted in the ESPN.com power rankings. As a result, Wisconsin stays at 6 (commence hate mail).

Let's get to it ...

1. Ohio State (12-0, last week: 1): Get used to the Buckeyes occupying the top spot under coach Urban Meyer, who guided Ohio State to its sixth unbeaten and untied season in team history. The big keys entering the offseason are addressing depth issues on the defensive side, finding more consistent playmakers to surround quarterback Braxton Miller and maintaining the standard set this season on the offensive line.

2. Michigan (8-4, last week: 3): Jadeveon Clowney and the South Carolina Gamecocks await Michigan at the Outback Bowl, giving the Wolverines one final chance at a signature victory. Clowney and Wolverines tackle Taylor Lewan face off in a battle of future NFLers. Michigan should benefit from bowl practices as it continues to adjust to having both Devin Gardner and Denard Robinson in the backfield.

3. Penn State (8-4, last week: 4): Penn State won't soon forget the 2012 season or the 2012 senior class, but it's now time to look ahead to an uncertain future. Bill O'Brien and his assistants must be extremely selective with the 2013 recruiting class and future classes, as they can ill afford to miss on more than a few prospects. Penn State loses a lot of star power on defense but has a nice piece to build around at defensive end in Big Ten Freshman of the Year Deion Barnes.

4. Nebraska (10-3, last week: 2): On the cusp of its first league title since 1999, Nebraska tumbled down the mountain yet again. Saturday's loss was an all-time stinker, the worst in team history, according to veteran columnist Tom Shatel. The defense allowed more rushing yards (539) than it ever has, and the offense turned over the ball and didn't find a rhythm until it was far too late. Nebraska will try to rebound against Georgia in the Capital One Bowl.

5. Northwestern (9-3, last week: 5): Will Northwestern finally get the bowl monkey off of its back this year? Pat Fitzgerald's crew has a potentially favorable matchup against slumping Mississippi State in the TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl. A young Wildcats squad should benefit from bowl practices, as players such as cornerback Nick VanHoose can fully heal. Northwestern's formidable rushing attack faces a Bulldogs defense ranked 70th nationally against the run.

6. Wisconsin (8-5, last week: 6): Yes, we saw what you saw Saturday night. The Badgers were brilliant. And if they follow it up against Stanford in the Rose Bowl Game presented by Vizio, they'll make a serious move up the power rankings. Still, this has been an inconsistent team that now must deal with the stunning departure of coach Bret Bielema to Arkansas. After dealing with so much adversity this season, can the Badgers rally again?

7. Michigan State (6-6, last week: 7): The good news for both the Spartans and their Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl opponent, TCU, is that their upcoming matchup is at a neutral site. Both squads failed to win a conference home game this season. Both squads are also very good on defense and inconsistent on offense. It'll be interesting to see Mark Dantonio and Gary Patterson match wits, and how Michigan State running back Le'Veon Bell performs against a stout Frogs defense.

8. Purdue (6-6, last week: 8): The Boilers have a new head coach in Darrell Hazell, but his impact won't be felt until 2013. An extremely tough matchup against Oklahoma State awaits Purdue in the Heart of Dallas Bowl. Cornerbacks Josh Johnson and Ricardo Allen will be tested early and often, and quarterback Robert Marve and the offense will need to put up big numbers for the Boilers to have a chance against the heavily favored Pokes.

9. Minnesota (6-6, last week: 9): Like Purdue, Minnesota heads to Texas for a bowl matchup in which it is a sizable underdog. And like the Boilers, Minnesota needs its cornerbacks (Michael Carter and Troy Stoudermire) to step up against a very good passing offense in Texas Tech (second nationally). The Red Raiders allowed 111 points in their final two games, but Minnesota's offense has been banged up and struggling and must get healthy this month.

10. Indiana (4-8, last week: 10): It's all about improving the defense in Bloomington, and Indiana has upgraded its recruiting, most recently adding a commitment Insider from defensive tackle Darius Latham, an ESPN 300 prospect who had originally pledged to Wisconsin. The Hoosiers need more depth and more talent on defense to complement what will be a very explosive offense in 2013.

11. Iowa (4-8, last week: 11): Offensive coordinator Greg Davis is staying, and he'll be tasked to upgrade an offense that took a significant step back in his first season. Jake Rudock is expected to step in at quarterback, and Iowa should have good depth at running back (famous last words, I know). The defense returns most of its key pieces and showed the ability to take the ball away this season (23).

12. Illinois (2-10, last week: 12): As expected, coach Tim Beckman will get at least another season to get things right after a miserable first go-round. Staff changes probably are coming as Illinois tries to get back on its feet before spring practice. The Illini lose several NFL-caliber defensive players, but the bigger concerns are with an offense that finished 119th nationally this season.

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Kirk Herbstreit's Gameplan Breakdown
Kirk Herbstreit looks at the five big rivalry games of the week that not only give state bragging rights but also have direct implications on the College Football Playoff.
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