Michigan Wolverines: Charles Woodson

Big Ten roundtable: Impact freshmen

June, 6, 2014
Jun 6
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With incoming freshmen set to report to their respective B1G teams later this month, we thought now would be a perfect time to take a closer look at the 2014 class.

Who'll end up as the most memorable player? And who'll see time right away? Adam Rittenberg, Brian Bennett and Josh Moyer joined Big Ten recruiting writer Tom VanHaaren in discussing the big questions surrounding the freshmen.

So let's get started ...

Based on talent, which freshman is too good to leave off the field?

[+] EnlargeJabrill Peppers
Miller Safrit/ESPNJabrill Peppers is the type of physical defensive back that Michigan's defense needs.
Bennett: First, let's start off with the caveat that college is a lot different from high school, and more goes into being successful at this level than pure physical gifts. That said, I have never heard anyone dispute the natural talent and football instincts of Michigan’s Jabrill Peppers. He was ESPN's No. 2 recruit in the Class of 2014 for a reason. The comparisons to Charles Woodson are already being made, and the corner spot is open with Blake Countess playing nickelback. Michigan needs to get more physical in its pass coverage and have more defensive playmakers in general. If Peppers fulfills even 80 percent of his hype, he'll be on the field early and often for Brady Hoke.

VanHaaren: Peppers is the first name that comes to mind. Michigan doesn't really have anyone like him on the roster. His combination of size and speed, which he displayed at a recent track meet by running a 10.52-second 100-meter dash, is something that Michigan needs in the defensive backfield. I just don't see a scenario where a healthy Peppers doesn't see the field in some capacity.

Moyer: Everyone should be familiar with Peppers, so let's forget about him for a minute. Someone whom Buckeyes fans already know -- and whom other B1G fans should familiarize themselves with -- is linebacker Raekwon McMillan, who was rated as the top inside linebacker recruit in the nation. He's already enrolled, he's already impressed Urban Meyer, and he's already a physically imposing athlete. At 240 pounds, he's bigger than all but one of OSU's 10 other linebackers. Almost every scouting report you read on the guy describes him as a "thumper," and Meyer said three months ago that there'll be no redshirt for McMillan. He should make an impact early on.

Based on need, which freshman is a lock to start from Day 1?

Bennett: I'll go with Purdue's Gelen Robinson. He's following in the footsteps, sort of, of his dad -- Boilers basketball legend Glenn "Big Dog" Robinson. The younger Robinson was Purdue's most celebrated recruit in this class, but not just because of that name. He's also an outstanding athlete who should force his way onto the field from Day 1. He'll likely play outside linebacker, which is a position of need for Darrell Hazell's team. Heck, they need players everywhere, but particularly difference-makers on defense. Robinson will get every opportunity.

Rittenberg: It's hard for true freshman offensive linemen to step in immediately, but keep an eye on Maryland's Damian Prince, the nation's No. 26 prospect in the 2014 class. The recent suspension of potential starter Moise Larose creates a need at tackle, and both Prince and Derwin Gray both have a chance to win starting jobs this summer. Wisconsin will play several of its freshman wide receivers, and I could easily see a guy like Dareian Watkins entering the starting lineup. And let's not forget about Michigan State defensive tackle Malik McDowell. The Spartans lost a few pieces on the interior defensive line.

Moyer: Penn State wideout De'Andre Thompkins. In a normal year, he might be a redshirt candidate. He's incredibly athletic -- Bill O'Brien recruited him thinking he could be a two-way player and compete at nickelback -- but he's also a bit raw since he played mostly at running back in high school. He still needs to sharpen his routes but, between the scholarship reduction and the lack of experience at receiver this season, Thompkins will have to step up sooner rather than later. The early enrollee has already proven he's the fastest player on the roster, and he's taken reps as a return man. So he should play on Day 1, in some capacity.

When this freshman class graduates, who will be remembered as the best player?

Bennett: Peppers is the easy and safe choice here. Another possibility is Maryland's Prince. He's a mountain, and given the value of offensive tackles in the NFL, we could be hearing his name early in the 2017 or 2018 draft.

VanHaaren: It could very well be either Peppers or McMillan. It's tough to argue against those two just based off of talent and ability, and I would probably go with Peppers here. I saw him at the Under Armour All-America Game and coach Herm Edwards told me Peppers was the best high school prospect he had coached in the few years he had been coaching at the event. That's high praise for a former defensive back.

[+] EnlargeDamian Prince
Tom Hauck for Student SportsThe massive Damian Prince might be too good to keep out of Maryland's starting lineup.
Rittenberg: McDowell's recruiting melodrama gained a lot of attention, overshadowing how good a player he could be for MSU. Mark Dantonio isn't one to heap praise on freshmen but held a news conference specifically to discuss McDowell, saying, "Malik will be on the field for us, he's too big and fast [not to be], he can play inside or outside." I've been told McDowell's parents are on board with MSU now, and with the distractions behind him, he should become a star for an already elite defense.

What redshirt freshman should fans keep an eye on?

Bennett: I trust the player development program at Michigan State. Guys there just seem to get better and better throughout their careers, especially on the defensive side of the ball. Defensive end Demetrius Cooper turned a lot of heads this spring and forced himself into the rotation, even with standout returning starters Shilique Calhoun and Marcus Rush ahead of him. Cooper was just a three-star recruit, according to ESPN, but the Spartans have made a living turning moderately-rated recruits into true college stars.

VanHaaren: I don't know if this is cheating or not because he's a sophomore, but I'm really interested to see what quarterback Wes Lunt does for Illinois. I put him here because he transferred and had to sit out the last season. I think he could be a big boost to that program if he can get things rolling offensively for the Illini.

Rittenberg: Iowa wide receiver Derrick Willies. Not only did he have a breakout spring for the Hawkeyes, but he's the type of receiver Iowa has lacked for a while: tall, fast and explosive. Iowa wants to ramp up the offensive tempo even more this season, which likely means the ball will be spread around more. Expect some big plays from Willies in his first game action.

Moyer: Minnesota running back Berkley Edwards. If it wasn't for an ankle injury early last season, he probably would've played. As it is, he'll definitely see the field this fall -- and he might see it quite a bit. Jerry Kill was asked earlier this spring if Edwards might get five to seven carries a game. "We'll see," Kill said, chuckling, to the Minneapolis Star Tribune. "He might need more touches." Edwards is an exciting player who has a chance to break it anytime he touches the ball, and he could end up being an important change-of-pace back for the offense. Definitely worth watching.

Big Ten lunch links

May, 21, 2014
May 21
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Only 99 days left.

Big Ten Friday mailblog

April, 11, 2014
Apr 11
4:30
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Enjoy all the spring games this weekend. We'll recap each early next week.

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To the inbox ...

Ethan from Abbottstown, Pa., writes: While watching March Madness, I couldn't help but notice how full the stands were for semis and finals. One of the arguments against the college playoff was that fans wouldn't travel on short notice. Why? I never understood that argument. March Madness has been in play for more than 75 years and the less popular college basketball with smaller fan bases have been traveling to game sites for under a week's notice for years.

Adam Rittenberg: Ethan, the concern isn't so much that fans would travel to a national semifinal but whether they could travel to both a semifinal and the championship game the following week. Are Ohio State fans going to attend the Rose Bowl in Pasadena and then head back to Arlington, Texas, the following week for the championship game? Would Oregon fans make two potentially long trips back to back? The nice thing about basketball's Final Four is that both the semis and title game are at the same site. Remember, you're filling much larger stadiums for football, and you ideally don't want the title game to just feature a corporate crowd.

 




LoveLikeLacey from Chicago writes: What are your thoughts on how the backup QB situation will work out at MSU? There are a great deal of implications if either Damion Terry or Tyler O'Connor transfer, since Sparty didn't take a QB in the 2014 class. I realize Terry has a great skill set and might even see the field this year in certain packages, but O'Connor was fairly highly recruited himself and I believe he also has some skills.

Adam Rittenberg: Love the name, Lacey. It will be interesting to see how that competition unfolds. Before Connor Cook became Connor Cook, some folks criticized the staff for not giving O'Connor much of a chance to prove himself in games. O'Connor seemed to perform well in last week's jersey scrimmage (10-for-15 passing, 132 yards, TD), and he has created some separation with Terry since the start of the spring. It might be a case in which MSU uses Terry in different ways to keep him involved this year, but Cook still has two years left, so a true O'Connor-Terry competition might not take place until 2016. It's not ideal, and it could result in one player leaving.

 




A.J. from Madison, Wis., writes: Adam, I love how Gary Andersen tries to adapt his schemes to the personnel he has. What has been driving me nuts, however, is the continual position switching of players back and forth. I get that he wants to maximize the talent on the field, but doesn't it hurt the development of the players? If you want to get the best players at the positions, part of that is learning technique and scheme, which seems difficult to do if guys keep getting moved.

Adam Rittenberg: A.J., it could come back to hurt Andersen, and as he told me this week, the switches don't always work, but you never know if you don't try. The good thing is Andersen has a track record for moving players around on defense and making it work. He did it at Utah State, which typically has less talent than Wisconsin, and produced strong defenses. There's definitely a big emphasis on technique as well, but the coaches need to see how a player looks at a certain position before making their determination.

 




Bob from Virginia writes: I didn't think you were fair with your comments about Julie Hermann and the Star-Ledger's campaign against her, specifically Steve Politi. I'd like to see you tell her face to face that you actually believe she was glad those people lost their jobs. You know it's not true. Have some integrity and stand up for what's right, Adam, not for a has-been columnist who had more to do with his paper's demise than anything else. Here's a different point of view of what happened in that classroom: Last I heard it was a free country, and if Julie felt the way she did about a newspaper, she had a good reason for it.

Adam Rittenberg: Bob, whether or not she's actually glad to see the newspaper struggling, she should have been more careful with her comments. Stand up for what's right? How about showing some poise despite the pressure? That's what other Big Ten athletic directors do. I understand there are discretion policies about comments made in classroom settings at Rutgers, but the risk of something like this getting out outweighs the potential benefit (is there a benefit?) of making that comment.

I doubt you're the only Rutgers fan who feels this way, but I look at the bigger picture. Very few people are fired up about Rutgers in the Big Ten. A lot of Big Ten fans strongly believe Rutgers doesn't belong. The events of the past year at Rutgers only reinforce this perception. It's up to Hermann, with help from Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany, to change the perception. This didn't help.

 




Mitch from Massachusetts writes: With Michigan's relatively new tradition of giving the numbers of great players from the past to current stars, do you see them ever giving out Charles Woodson's number 2? If so, who (besides Jabrill Peppers) has a shot of wearing it?

Adam Rittenberg: Interesting question, Mitch. Most of the legends Michigan is honoring played a long time ago, such as Tom Harmon (QB Devin Gardner wears his No. 98) or Bennie Oosterbaan (LB Jake Ryan wears his No. 47). I'm not sure how Michigan would feel about doing the same thing for a fairly recent player like Woodson, who is still active in the NFL. My sense is the program would rather wait and honor other players who might be lesser known by most younger fans. While Peppers could be a star, I'd be shocked if he received such an honor early in his career. Veteran CB Blake Countess would be a better bet.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The Michigan-Ohio State rivalry has a ton of individual moments which stick out in the memories of fans, be it individual performances or games or sometimes even the hoopla surrounding it.

Considering this rivalry is among the biggest, longest and best in sports, there is an overflow of Michigan-Ohio State moments to pick from when it comes to selecting the five most memorable, from a Michigan perspective.

Here’s one man’s look at five signature moments in the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry.

1. Michigan upsets Ohio State in 1969: The game which turned the rivalry from just another rivalry into one of the most celebrated rivalries regardless of sport in the nation. First-year head coach Bo Schembechler and Michigan upset Ohio State, 24-12, snapping a 22-game winning streak for the Buckeyes. The win sparked the “Ten-Year War” between Michigan and Ohio State and its legendary coaches, Schembechler and Woody Hayes. At the time it was considered among the biggest upsets in college football history.

[+] EnlargeTim Biakabutuka
AP Photo/Tom PidgeonMichigan running back Tim Biakabutuka high steps past an Ohio State defender to gain some of his career-high 313 yards.
2. Tim Biakabutuka, 1995: Perhaps the single-most impressive individual performance from a Michigan player in the history of the rivalry. While Biakabutuka only scored once in a 31-23 win over then-No. 2 Ohio State, ruining the Buckeyes’ national title hopes, he gained 313 yards, slashing through the entirety of the OSU defense. It was the second-best single-game rushing performance in Michigan history and one of two 300-plus yard rushing games in school history.

3. Snow Bowl, 1950: Like most seasons, the Big Ten title was on the line when these teams played in what the Ohio State library website quotes the Ohio State University Monthly as a “full-scale blizzard.” Michigan won, 9-3, in a game where Wolverines punter Chuck Ortmann punted 24 times. The game’s only touchdown, according to the OSU library site, came after a blocked Ohio State punt in the end zone was recovered by Michigan.

4. Punt returns. So many punt returns: Stop in the end zone. Look around. Pose. When Desmond Howard finished off a 93-yard punt return for a touchdown in 1991, he struck the iconic Heisman pose still replayed more than 20 years later. The return -- and the pose against Ohio State -- helped cinch his Heisman Trophy. Six seasons later, with another potential statue there for the taking, Charles Woodson caught a punt of his own and returned it 78 yards for a touchdown to help Michigan knock off the Buckeyes. Woodson didn’t pose after his return, but the win pushed Michigan to the Rose Bowl and eventual national championship. Oh, and for Woodson, the first and only primarily defensive player to win the Heisman.

5. The day after Bo Schembechler’s death: The day before the biggest game in the history of this rivalry, one of its biggest icons collapsed and died of a heart attack. Bo Schembechler, the architect of a lot of what has turned into the Michigan football of today, had passed away. The last 24 hours of his life included a funeral for a former player, speaking to the 2006 Michigan team and a dinner with old friends. While Michigan lost the next day in Columbus, it turned what would usually have been one of the more intense atmospheres of the year into a somber remembrance. Ohio State honored Schembechler, a former assistant, before the game. His death also transformed Michigan’s program for a handful of years until Brady Hoke’s hire in 2011.
The rivalry never sleeps, even in the middle of summer as the final days tick away until camp opens in August.

But just in case a little offseason kick was needed to get the juices flowing for the next edition of "The Game," BuckeyeNation and WolverineNation are teaming up for a week of content looking at some moments from the past and forecasting what will happen a few short months into the future.

Today, we peek back into series history and identify some of the top heroes and villains from the blood feud. Here are Ohio State's villain for the Wolverines:

1. Jim Tressel, coach: From the moment he was introduced and grabbed a microphone to address the Ohio State faithful, Tressel’s mission was clear -- get the program back on top in The Game. The Buckeyes backed up their new coach with a road upset in 2001, and the next decade was completely dominated by The Vest, who posted a 9-1 record before scandal ended his run on the sideline. Even his exit might have twisted the knife in the Wolverines since it helped Ohio State land Urban Meyer, who knocked off Michigan in his first Game to finish an unbeaten season in 2012.

2. Troy Smith, quarterback: At the height of that dominant run under Tressel, it was the prolific signal-caller inflicting the majority of the damage on the Wolverines. Smith became just the second Ohio State quarterback to beat Michigan three times, with the last couple coming in forgettable fashion. There was the late comeback in 2005 keyed that included 386 passing yards from Smith, and another virtuoso performance in the epic showdown in 2006 that individually clinched a Heisman and sent the Buckeyes to the national title game.

[+] EnlargeSean Payton, er, Woody Hayes
George Long/Getty ImagesIt was during Woody Hayes' 27 years as Ohio State head coach that the blood feud with Michigan truly took shape.
3. Woody Hayes, coach: The rivalry became firmly entrenched among the most passionate, competitive series in the country when Hayes was at the top of his coaching game and matching wits -- and trading barbs -- with Bo Schembechler. Tressel’s gaudy record might have diminished some of hatred for Hayes, however slightly, but his 16 wins in The Game, an infamous decision to go for a 2-point conversion “because he couldn’t go for 3” and his place in Ohio State history will always get some Michigan blood boiling.

4. Mike Doss, safety: Working on a 14-year drought in Ann Arbor and trying to live up to the goal Tressel established when he took over, Doss was instrumental in snapping the skid and setting the tone under Ohio State’s new coach in 2001. A pair of interceptions helped set up scoring drives, and an unranked group of Buckeyes snatched a 26-20 win over the No. 11 Wolverines to start building the momentum that would last for pretty much the entire decade.

5. David Boston, wide receiver: After coming up short in 1997 and hearing all about it from Charles Woodson, Boston exacted some revenge a year later with a massive individual performance as the Buckeyes knocked off the Wolverines 31-16 for one of John Cooper's two wins in the series. Boston was already an enemy for his brash comments before his final season with the Buckeyes, but he could be easily dismissed without ever winning a game. He changed that with 10 catches for 217 yards and two touchdowns, finally backing up his mouth and getting the best of Michigan where it counted -- on the field.

Bonus pick -- Bob Ferguson, fullback: The message apparently hadn’t been delivered emphatically enough, despite Ferguson already having scored three times. He would finish the game with 151 yards. The fourth touchdown by the All-American rusher, though, set the table for the Buckeyes to rub a 50-20 win and a national championship in Michigan’s face in 1961 by going for a 2-point conversion with the outcome well in hand.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Nothing really says as much about a rivalry as a good villain. Every narrative, whether someone wants to admit it or not, has one. There’s a white hat, a black hat, all of those cliched things.

With Michigan and Ohio State, there is plenty to go around.

Here’s a look at the top five Michigan villains for the Buckeyes, most of whom had a hand in critical wins in the last game of the regular season.

1. Bo Schembechler, Coach: Much like Woody Hayes on the Ohio State side (and maybe Jim Tressel) there is no surprise Schembechler is tops on this list. Heck, a band made up of Ohio State fans even called themselves the Dead Schembechlers. Bo vs. Woody still ranks among the best coaching rivalries in the history of sports. Schembechler finished 11-9-1 against his biggest rival and a 5-4-1 record against Hayes. Oh, and if there were any questions about this, Schembechler’s win over Ohio State in 1969 ignited the “Ten-Year War,” which elevated this rivalry to among the best in all of sports.

[+] EnlargeJim Harbaugh
Mike Powell/Allsport Michigan quarterback and Ann Arbor native Jim Harbaugh guaranteed a win over Ohio State in 1986 and delivered.
2. Jim Harbaugh, QB: You make a guarantee that you will beat your rival, you'd better back it up. When Harbaugh, who grew up in Ann Arbor, said Michigan would beat Ohio State, he permanently placed himself in the history of this rivalry. The Monday before The Game in 1986, Harbaugh said “I guarantee we will beat Ohio State and go to Pasadena.” Michigan’s response -- they had to do it. Harbaugh did, leading the Wolverines to a 26-24 win at Ohio State that Saturday, sending his team to the Rose Bowl.

3. Charles Woodson, DB: Where to start? Woodson talked trash with Ohio State receiver David Boston prior to the 1997 contest, then went out and clinched the Heisman Trophy with a 37-yard touchdown reception, a 78-yard punt return touchdown and an interception. This on top of his 1995 performance as a freshman, where in the Tim Biakabutuka game he intercepted two passes to knock off the undefeated Buckeyes. Being from Fremont, Ohio, only makes it more difficult to deal with.

4. Tom Harmon, HB: Harmon wasn’t really even a villain in this rivalry except that he was just so much better than the rest of his peers at the time. According to the Heisman Trophy website, Harmon completed 11 of 12 passes for 151 yards and two touchdowns along with 139 rushing yards and two touchdowns in the final game of his college career and against Ohio State. He also intercepted three passes and kicked four extra points in the game. Harmon won the Heisman after the season. Why wasn’t he a bigger villain? Consider this: After the performance, the Michigan Alumnus magazine (on the Bentley Historical Library website) said the crowd at Ohio State gave Harmon a “thundering ovation.” Chances are, that doesn’t happen today.

5. Barry Pierson, DB: In the game which really launched the rivalry -- that 1969 one -- Pierson intercepted Ohio State three times. He also had a massive special teams play, returning an Ohio State punt 60 yards to set up a Michigan touchdown. While that entire 1969 team could probably be on that list, Pierson statistically made a major impact that day.

Bonus selection: Drew Henson, QB: Henson is on this list for a couple of reasons. He was the last Michigan quarterback to beat Ohio State in Columbus in 2000. While that alone might not be enough to be on this list, consider this: When he left Michigan to pursue baseball following that season, he was assigned to be the third basemen for ... the Columbus Clippers. It did not go well. Henson was booed over and over again despite playing for the hometown team and the Triple-A affiliate of the Yankees. All because he played for Michigan and beat Ohio State.

Fresh ideas: Cornerback 

July, 12, 2013
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ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Can a true freshman really contribute at the college level? Is it easier to do so at one position than another? Over the next two months WolverineNation will be breaking down the probabilities of playing time and projections of the Wolverines’ freshmen, position by position. Today, we look at cornerback.

Ohio State and Michigan don’t get along very well, period.

But if the Buckeyes were able to nab one player for their all-time draft to round out a team, fans might not mind it. Well, if for no other reason than to stick it to the Wolverines.

After analyzing WolverineNation’s draft and looking at my own team, it came down to three players.

[+] EnlargeCharles Woodson
Jonathan Daniel/Stringer/Getty ImagesAt Michigan, Charles Woodson won the 1997 Heisman Trophy and became the first predominantly defensive player to win the award. And he's also from Fremont, Ohio.
It was either Tom Harmon from Chantel Jennings, Desmond Howard from Michael Rothstein or Charles Woodson from Tom VanHaaren.

All three were Heisman winners, and Harmon is the only player to lead the nation in scoring in consecutive years. But sorry, I’ll still take two-time Heisman king Archie Griffin in my backfield.

That left the choice between Howard and Woodson. Both were great for Michigan, but Woodson was arguably the best player on the last national championship team for the Wolverines. Even if that title was shared. (Sorry, couldn’t resist the dig there.)

That said, what Woodson did against Ohio State -- and all of college football for that matter -- can’t be overstated.

An eight-time Pro Bowl selection and seven-time All-Pro, the defensive rookie of the year and Super Bowl champion’s game certainly translated to the NFL.

But this wasn’t a draft based on the NFL, it was a draft based on college, and what the native of Fremont, Ohio, did for the Wolverines was legendary.

The Big Ten Freshman of the Year in 1995, Woodson set a Michigan record for pass breakups as a sophomore with 15, was a finalist for the Jim Thorpe Award and was an Associated Press first-team All-American.

In 1997, he was the first predominantly defensive player to win the Heisman. He also won the Bronko Nagurski Trophy and Jim Thorpe Award and was the Chevrolet Defensive Player of the year for the second year in a row.

Ohio State remembers Woodson for returning a punt 78 yards for a score against the Buckeyes in 1997 and stopping a fourth-quarter drive with an interception in the end zone.

He finished his college career with 18 interceptions, 30 pass breakups and countless broken hearts collected from Buckeyes fans.

That made him an easy pick as the player I’d take from Michigan and suit up in scarlet and gray.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The top picks in the WolverineNation all-time draft all had a few characteristics in common: They were tremendous players at Michigan; they had high goals and worked hard to achieve them; and they, for the most part, avoided serious injuries. And in the time since they left the maize and blue, they still seem recent in fans’ memories.

So it’s not hard to imagine that in 20 years, when a new set of writers are drafting an all-time team, there might be a member of the 2014 class going early, gracing himself among the one-named fames of Michigan football -- Harmon, Desmond, Woodson, Long, Braylon and maybe ... Peppers?


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Region Series Quick Hits: Midwest 

June, 11, 2013
6/11/13
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ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Quick Hits is a look at the must-know facts for each region in regard to Michigan and its football recruiting efforts. It will give you an idea of the Wolverines’ history in that region, as well as what one can expect from that region over the next few seasons.

MIDWEST

1. How many players on Michigan’s roster are from the region?


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Michigan in the NFL: Week 5

October, 9, 2012
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Here are how Michigan's alumni fared in Week 5 of the NFL season:

  • Jay Feely, K, Arizona: Made 1 of 2 field goals in a 17-3 loss to St. Louis. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Leon Hall, CB, Cincinnati: Had two tackles (1 solo, 1 assisted) and a pass defended in a 17-13 loss to Miami. Next up -- vs. Cleveland, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jeff Backus, OT, Detroit: Idle. Next up -- vs. Philadelphia, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Charles Woodson, CB, Green Bay: Made eight tackles (7 solo, 1 assisted) and two passes defended in a 30-27 loss to Indianapolis. Next up -- vs. Houston, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Tim Jamison, DE, Houston: Did not make a tackle in a 23-17 win over the New York Jets. Next up -- vs. Green Bay, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Chad Henne, QB, Jacksonville: DNP in a 41-3 loss to Chicago. Next up -- OFF
  • Steve Breaston, WR, Kansas City: Did not catch a pass in a 9-6 loss to Baltimore. Next up -- vs. Tampa Bay, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jake Long, OT, Miami: Started at left tackle in a 17-13 win over Cincinnati. Next up -- vs. St. Louis, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Tom Brady, QB, New England: Completed 23 of 31 passes for 223 yards and one touchdown along with four rushes for minus-2 yards in a 31-21 win over Denver. Next up -- vs. Seattle, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Zoltan Mesko, P, New England: Punted three times with a 43 yard average and one inside the 20-yard line in a 31-21 win over Denver. Next up -- vs. Seattle, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • David Baas, C, New York Giants: Started at center in a 41-27 win over Cleveland. Next up -- vs. San Francisco, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Stevie Brown, DB, New York Giants: Had three tackles (2 solo, 1 assisted), a pass defended and an interception in a 41-27 win over Cleveland. Next up -- vs. San Francisco, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • David Harris, LB, New York Jets: Had nine tackles (5 solo, 4 assisted) and a pass defended in a 23-17 loss to Houston. Next up -- vs. Indianapolis, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jason Avant, WR, Philadelphia: Had three receptions for 34 yards in a 16-14 loss to Pittsburgh. Next up -- vs. Detroit, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Brandon Graham, DE, Philadelphia: Had one assisted tackle in a 16-14 loss to Pittsburgh. Next up -- vs. Detroit, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Larry Foote, LB, Pittsburgh: Had eight tackles (5 solo, 3 assisted) and recovered two fumbles in a 16-14 win over Philadelphia. Next up -- vs. Tennessee, Thursday 8:20 p.m.
  • LaMarr Woodley, LB, Pittsburgh: Had no tackles in a 16-14 win over Philadelphia. Next up -- vs. Tennessee, Thursday 8:20 p.m.
  • David Molk, C, San Diego: Played in a 31-24 loss to New Orleans. Next up -- vs. Denver, Monday 8:30 p.m.
  • Jonas Mouton, LB, San Diego: Was inactive in a 31-24 loss to New Orleans. Next up -- vs. Denver, Monday 8:30 p.m.
  • Jonathan Goodwin, OL, San Francisco: Started at center in a 45-3 win over Buffalo. Next up -- vs. New York Giants, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Mario Manningham, WR, San Francisco: Had four catches for 26 yards and a touchdown in a 45-3 win over Buffalo. Next up -- vs. New York Giants, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Alan Branch, DT, Seattle: Had two tackles (1 solo, 1 assisted) in a 16-12 win over Carolina. Next up -- vs. New England, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Braylon Edwards, WR, Seattle: Had one catch for 10 yards in a 16-12 win over Carolina. Next up -- vs. New England, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Steve Hutchinson, OG, Tennessee: Started at left guard in a 30-7 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- vs. Pittsburgh, Thursday 8:20 p.m.
  • Mike Martin, DT, Tennessee: Had five tackles (3 solo, 2 assisted) and a sack in a 30-7 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- vs. Pittsburgh, Thursday 8:20 p.m.

Michigan in the NFL: Week 4

October, 2, 2012
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Jay FeelyJennifer Stewart/US PresswireJay Feely's field goal in overtime on Sunday pushed the Cardinals to a surprising 4-0.
Here are how Michigan's alumni fared in Week 4 of the NFL season:

  • Jay Feely, K, Arizona: Made a field goal all three extra points in a 24-21 win over Miami. Next up -- vs. St. Louis, Thursday, 8:20 p.m.
  • Leon Hall, CB, Cincinnati: Was inactive due to injury against Jacksonville. Next up -- vs. Miami, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jeff Backus, OT, Detroit: Started at tackle in a 20-13 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- Idle
  • Charles Woodson, CB, Green Bay: Made 11 tackles (8 solo, 3 assisted) in a 28-27 win over New Orleans. Next up -- vs. Indianapolis, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Tim Jamison, DE, Houston: Made one assisted tackle in a 38-14 win over Tennessee. Next up -- vs. New York Jets, Monday 8:30 p.m.
  • Chad Henne, QB, Jacksonville: DNP in a 27-10 loss to Cincinnati. Next up -- vs. Chicago, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Steve Breaston, WR, Kansas City: Had one catch for 12 yards in a 37-20 loss to San Diego. Next up -- vs. Baltimore, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jake Long, OT, Miami: Started at left tackle in a 24-21 loss to Miami. Next up -- vs. Cincinnati, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Tom Brady, QB, New England: Completed 22 of 36 passes for 340 yards and three touchdowns along with one rush for four yards and a touchdown in a 52-28 win over Buffalo. Next up -- vs. Denver, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Zoltan Mesko, P, New England: Punted three times with a 39.7 yard average and three inside the 20-yard line. Next up -- vs. Denver, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • David Baas, C, New York Giants: Started at center in a 19-17 loss to Philadelphia. Next up -- vs. Cleveland, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Stevie Brown, DB, New York Giants: Had eight tackles (7 solo, 1 assisted) in a 19-17 loss to Philadelphia. Next up -- vs. Cleveland, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • David Harris, LB, New York Jets: Had 11 tackles (8 solo, 3 assisted) in a 34-0 loss to San Francisco. Next up -- vs. Houston, Monday 8:30 p.m.
  • Jason Avant, WR, Philadelphia: Had two receptions for 30 yards in a 19-17 win over the New York Giants. Next up -- vs. Pittsburgh, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Brandon Graham, DE, Philadelphia: Did not have a tackle in a 19-17 win over the New York Giants. Next up -- vs. Pittsburgh, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Larry Foote, LB, Pittsburgh: OFF. Next up -- vs. Philadelphia, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • LaMarr Woodley, LB, Pittsburgh: OFF. Next up -- vs. Philadelphia, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • David Molk, C, San Diego: Played in a 37-20 win over Kansas City. Next up -- vs. New Orleans, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Jonas Mouton, LB, San Diego: Was inactive in a 37-20 win over Kansas City. Next up -- vs. New Orleans, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Jonathan Goodwin, OL, San Francisco: Started at center in a 34-0 win over the New York Jets. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Mario Manningham, WR, San Francisco: Had three catches for 47 yards and one rush for 28 yards in a 34-0 win over the New York Jets. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Alan Branch, DT, Seattle: Had one tackle and one pass broken up in a 19-13 loss to St. Louis. Next up -- vs. Carolina, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Braylon Edwards, WR, Seattle: Had no catches in a 19-13 loss to St. Louis. Next up -- vs. Carolina, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Steve Hutchinson, OG, Tennessee: Started at left guard in a 38-14 loss to Houston. Next up -- vs. Minnesota, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Mike Martin, DT, Tennessee: Had one assisted tackle in a 38-14 loss to Houston. Next up -- vs. Minnesota, Sunday 4:25 p.m.

Michigan in the NFL: Week 3

September, 25, 2012
9/25/12
8:40
AM ET
Here are how Michigan's alumni fared in Week 3 of the NFL season:

  • Jay Feely, K, Arizona: Made both his field goals and all three extra points in a 27-6 win over Philadelphia. Next up -- vs. Miami, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Leon Hall, CB, Cincinnati: Was inactive due to injury against Washington. Next up -- vs. Jacksonville, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Jeff Backus, OT, Detroit: Started at tackle in a 44-41 loss to Tennessee. Next up -- vs. Minnesota, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Charles Woodson, CB, Green Bay: Made three tackles (2 solo, 1 assisted) in a 14-12 loss to Seattle. Next up -- vs. New Orleans, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Tim Jamison, DE, Houston: Made one tackle in a 31-25 win over Denver. Next up -- vs. Tennessee, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Chad Henne, QB, Jacksonville: DNP in a 22-17 win over Indianapolis. Next up -- vs. Cincinnati, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Steve Breaston, WR, Kansas City: Had one catch for two yards in a 27-24 win over New Orleans. Next up -- vs. San Diego, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jake Long, OT, Miami: Started at left tackle in a 23-20 loss to the New York Jets. Next up -- vs. Arizona, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Tom Brady, QB, New England: Completed 28 of 41 passes for 335 yards, a touchdown and an interception in a 31-30 loss to Baltimore. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Zoltan Mesko, P, New England: Punted four times with a 38.3 yard average and two inside the 20-yard line. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • David Baas, C, New York Giants: Started at center in a 36-7 win over Carolina. Next up -- vs. Philadelphia, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Stevie Brown, DB, New York Giants: Had an interception in a 36-7 win over Carolina. Next up -- vs. Philadelphia, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • David Harris, LB, New York Jets: Had nine tackles (8 solo, 1 assisted) in a 23-20 win over Miami. Next up -- vs. San Francisco, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jason Avant, WR, Philadelphia: Had three receptions for 38 yards in a 27-6 loss to Arizona. Next up -- vs. New York Giants, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Brandon Graham, DE, Philadelphia: Had four tackles (3 solo, 1 assisted) and a half-sack in a 27-6 loss to Arizona. Next up -- vs. New York Giants, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Larry Foote, LB, Pittsburgh: Had seven tackles (5 solo, 2 assisted) in a 34-31 loss to Oakland. Next up -- OFF
  • LaMarr Woodley, LB, Pittsburgh: Had four tackles, all solo, and a sack in a 34-31 loss to Oakland. Next up -- OFF
  • David Molk, C, San Diego: Played in a 27-3 loss to Atlanta. Next up -- vs. Kansas City, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jonas Mouton, LB, San Diego: Was inactive in a 27-3 loss to Atlanta. Next up -- vs. Kansas City, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jonathan Goodwin, OL, San Francisco: Started at center in a 24-13 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- vs. New York Jets, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Mario Manningham, WR, San Francisco: Had five catches for 56 yards in a 24-13 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- vs. New York Jets, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Alan Branch, DT, Seattle: Had no tackles in a 14-12 win over Green Bay. Next up -- vs. St. Louis, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Braylon Edwards, WR, Seattle: Had no catches in a 14-12 win over Green Bay. Next up -- vs. St. Louis, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Steve Hutchinson, OG, Tennessee: Started at left guard in a 44-41 win over Detroit. Next up -- vs. Houston, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Mike Martin, DT, Tennessee: Had five tackles (3 solo, 2 assisted) in a 44-41 win over Detroit. Next up -- vs. Houston, Sunday 1 p.m.

Michigan in the NFL: Week 1

September, 11, 2012
9/11/12
10:34
PM ET
Here's a look at how former Michigan players fared during Week 1 of the NFL season:
  • Jay Feely, K, Arizona: Made both his field goals and extra points in a 20-16 win over Seattle. Next up -- vs. New England, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Leon Hall, CB, Cincinnati: Had four tackles (all solo) and two pass deflections in a 44-13 loss to Baltimore. Next up -- vs. Cleveland, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jeff Backus, OT, Detroit: Started at tackle and blocked for 429 yards of offense in a 27-23 win over St. Louis. Next up -- vs. San Francisco, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Charles Woodson, CB, Green Bay: Had five tackles (3 solo, 2 assisted), two quarterback hurries, a forced fumble and 1.5 sacks in a 30-22 loss to San Francisco. Next up -- vs. Chicago, Thursday 8:30 p.m.
  • Tim Jamison, DE, Houston: Had one tackle and one sack in a 30-10 win over Miami. Next up -- vs. Jacksonville, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Chad Henne, QB, Jacksonville: DNP in 26-23 loss to Minnesota. Next up -- vs. Houston, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Steve Breaston, WR, Kansas City: Had two catches for 30 yards in a 40-24 loss to Atlanta. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Junior Hemingway, WR, Kansas City: DNP (Practice squad) against Atlanta. Next up -- vs. Buffalo, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Jake Long, OT, Miami: Started at left tackle and blocked for 275 yards of offense in a 30-10 loss to Houston. Next up -- vs. Oakland, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Tom Brady, QB, New England: Completed 23 of 31 passes for 236 yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions along with two rushes for one yard in a 34-13 win over Tennessee. Next up -- vs. Arizona, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Zoltan Mesko, P, New England: Punted four times with a 33.5 yard net average, including a long of 51 yards and three inside the 20 in a 34-13 win over Tennessee. Next up -- vs. Arizona, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • David Baas, C, New York Giants: started and helped block for 269 yards of offense in a 24-17 loss to Dallas. Next up -- Tampa Bay, Sunday, 1 p.m.
  • Stevie Brown, DB, New York Giants: had two tackles in a 24-17 loss to Dallas. Next up -- Tampa Bay, Sunday, 1 p.m.
  • David Harris, LB, New York Jets: Had seven tackles (4 solo, 3 assisted) and three assisted tackles in a 48-28 win over Buffalo. Next up -- vs. Pittsburgh, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Jason Avant, WR, Philadelphia: Had four catches for 27 yards in a 17-16 win over Cleveland. Next up -- vs. Baltimore, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Brandon Graham, DE, Philadelphia: Had one tackle in a 17-16 win over Cleveland. Next up -- vs. Baltimore, Sunday 1 p.m.
  • Larry Foote, LB, Pittsburgh: Had eight tackles (7 solo, 1 assisted), a sack and a pass defended in a 31-19 loss to Denver. Next up -- vs. New York Jets, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • LaMarr Woodley, LB, Pittsburgh: Had three tackles (1 solo, 2 assisted) in a 31-19 loss to Denver. Next up -- vs. New York Jets, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • David Molk, C, San Diego: He played, but did not start, in a 22-14 win over Oakland. Next up -- vs. Tennessee, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Jonas Mouton, LB, San Diego: Listed as inactive against Oakland. Next up -- vs. Tennessee, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Jonathan Goodwin, OL, San Francisco: Started at center and blocked for 377 yards of offense in a 30-22 win over the Packers. Next up -- vs. Detroit, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Mario Manningham, WR, San Francisco: Had four catches for 29 yards in a 30-22 win over the Packers. Next up -- vs. Detroit, Sunday 8:20 p.m.
  • Alan Branch, DT, Seattle: Had three tackles (1 solo, 2 assisted) in a 20-16 loss to Arizona. Next up -- vs. Dallas, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Braylon Edwards, WR, Seattle: Had five catches for 43 yards in a 20-16 loss to Arizona. Next up -- vs. Dallas, Sunday 4:05 p.m.
  • Steve Hutchinson, OG, Tennessee: Started at left guard and blocked for 292 yards of offense in a 34-13 loss to New England. Next up -- vs. San Diego, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
  • Mike Martin, DT, Tennessee: Had one solo tackle and two assisted tackles in a 34-13 loss to New England. Next up -- vs. San Diego, Sunday 4:25 p.m.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- It started as a golf tournament in 2007. Now, the event run by former Michigan football players Brian Griese, Steve Hutchinson and Charles Woodson has turned into much more.

The 2012 Griese/Hutchinson/Woodson Champions for Children's Hearts banquet gala took place Saturday evening at the Al Glick Fieldhouse and the building usually reserved for Michigan football practice ended up for one night as a place for major fundraising.

The dinner unofficially raised around $500,000 through its live auction and $1,000 football toss on Saturday night. That figure does not include money raised from a silent auction of other prizes.

The live auction prize with the highest bid was a weekend in Green Bay, Wis. to see a Packers game from former Michigan Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson's seats, dinner with Woodson and a tour of Lambeau Field. After discussion, Woodson gave away two of the packages at $21,000 each.

Woodson, Griese and Hutchinson have chaired the weekend for multiple years and were also given another honor Saturday for their years of work.

The three now have a seating area in one of the gardens at the Mott Children's Hospital named after them. The garden is where patients and families often gather while patients are in the hospital.

"That was unexpected," Griese said. "On behalf of Charles and Steve, we continue to be humbled by the support we receive from all of you. It means the world to us to be a part of Mott Children's Hospital in this way. It is truly an honor."

The event began Friday with a 12-hour radio telethon and concludes Sunday with a golf tournament at the University of Michigan golf course.

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