LSU Tigers: Dillon Gordon

LSU position breakdown: TE

July, 31, 2014
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Editor’s note: This week, we’ll take a quick look at each of LSU's position groups as the Tigers prepare to open preseason practice next week. Up next are the tight ends.

TIGHT END

Returning starters: Dillon Gordon (Six catches, 88 yards in 2013). Gordon started 12 of LSU’s 13 games last season. He had the most catches among LSU’s tight ends. Logan Stokes (no catches) started three games last season and Travis Dickson (5 catches, 109 yards) started once.

Starters lost: None.

Key newcomers: The Tigers signed the extremely athletic Jacory Washington -- ESPN’s No. 169 overall prospect and No. 5 traditional tight end -- in February. They also added junior college transfer Colin Jeter to the roster during the summer.

Player to watch: DeSean Smith (1 catch, 14 yards). Gordon, Stokes and Dickson are all established veterans and all will continue to fill roles in an LSU offensive scheme that regularly features multiple tight ends. Smith, however, stands to make the biggest leap after making only minor contributions as a freshman in 2013. He seems to be a gifted pass catcher and could become a key player if Cam Cameron’s offense begins to feature its tight ends more frequently as pass targets.

Overall: This is one of the deepest groups on LSU’s roster, although the tight ends don’t have much in the way of statistics to show for the group’s collective experience. That could change this season. Cameron traditionally has made extensive use of his tight ends, and with LSU undergoing extensive turnover at wide receiver and at quarterback, this seems like a good season to take advantage of the Tigers’ experience at tight end.

There are a couple of strong blockers in the group -- and that will certainly always rank among most tight ends’ top priorities -- but LSU has added a couple of players at the position who are capable of splitting out wide and functioning as receivers. Smith is such a player, and he might be in line for a strong season. In fact, let’s chalk the entire group for an uptick in offensive production in 2014 in addition to their traditional blocking duties.
Editor’s note: On Thursday, we examined LSU’s success on third down last season (the Tigers led the nation by converting 57.1 percent of the time) and the importance the quarterbacks will play in remaining successful. Today we explore how much production the Tigers must replace at the skill positions in order to remain effective on third down.

BATON ROUGE, La. -- Among ESPN’s top-10 quarterback prospects for the upcoming NFL draft, LSU’s Zach Mettenberger posted the best third-down conversion percentage (53.7) of the bunch.

Certainly it helped that Mettenberger possesses a cannon for a right arm and the experience that comes with being a fifth-year senior. But even Mettenberger would agree that he greatly benefited from the freakish playmaking abilities of receivers Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham and tailback Jeremy Hill.

That foursome helped LSU lead all FBS teams with a 57.1-percent conversion rate on third down last season, but now all four are waiting to hear their names called in next month’s NFL draft.

That leaves offensive coordinator Cam Cameron and the other offensive assistants with the burden of replacing some incredibly productive players who were often at their best on third down.

On Thursday, we looked at the role young quarterbacks Anthony Jennings and Brandon Harris will play in LSU’s third-down fortunes in the fall. We’ll do a bit more of that in a second, plus we’ll examine LSU’s third-down production at receiver and running back in an effort to identify which returning players have the most experience at keeping drives alive by achieving all-important first downs.

Mettenberger was outstanding on third down last season, averaging 16.6 yards per completion and throwing only one interception against nine touchdowns. That’s going to be nearly impossible for either Jennings or Harris to duplicate this season, but it should help that the two youngsters have the ability to run as well as throw.

Mettenberger hung out in the pocket as if his sneakers were made of lead, but Jennings and Harris are both quick enough to move the chains on the run. Harris, in particular, showed his speed in the Tigers’ spring game with a 41-yard run, and he also converted for a first down or touchdown on six of the last eight times he was under center on a third down.

Jennings struggled in that department in the spring game, with the offense converting for a first down just once in his seven attempts on third down. He also threw an interception that linebacker Deion Jones returned for a 67-yard touchdown on a third down.

Mettenberger should send a thank you note to Landry for all the times he made a clutch grab to extend a drive or end one with a touchdown. The junior wideout made a catch on 28 of the 35 times he was targeted, with 20 of the receptions earning a first down and six more going for a touchdown. He finished the season with 474 receiving yards and an average of 16.9 yards per catch on third down alone.

Beckham’s solid numbers are unfairly overshadowed by Landry’s, as Beckham caught a pass on 15 of the 25 times he was targeted on third down, gaining 272 yards in the process. Thanks to a pair of penalties against defenders, LSU actually picked up more first downs (16) on passes in which Beckham was targeted than there were instances when he actually caught the ball (15). He averaged 18.1 yards per catch on third down.

LSU’s problem is that only two of its top six third-down targets will be back this fall. Travin Dural (five catches, 97 yards, two touchdowns on third down) returns, but wideout Kadron Boone (four catches, 93 yards and two touchdowns) and tailback Alfred Blue (three catches, 46 yards) are both gone.

It wouldn’t be a surprise to see tailback Terrence Magee (three catches, 46 yards), tight ends such as DeSean Smith, Travis Dickson and Dillon Gordon and fullback Connor Neighbors play more active roles on third down in Landry's and Beckham’s absence. The Tigers might also lean heavily on a new crop of receivers (including redshirt freshman John Diarse and signees Malachi Dupre and Trey Quinn) on key downs once the season begins.

Hill was superb when Cameron called his number on third down last season, averaging 13.2 yards per carry and achieving either a first down or a touchdown 13 times in 18 tries. Included in that fairly small collection of carries was a 49-yard touchdown on a third-down run against Auburn, a 69-yard burst for a score against Mississippi State and a 37-yard score that put away the Tigers’ Outback Bowl victory over Iowa.

Magee and Kenny Hilliard, meanwhile, posted fairly pedestrian numbers in limited work on third down. Both players receieved eight carries on third down, with Magee achieving three first downs and two touchdowns (he also lost a fumble) and Hilliard getting two first downs and two touchdowns.

The fullback typically earns some short-yardage carries in LSU’s offense – senior J.C. Copeland picked up two first downs and scored twice in four carries on third down – so it will be interesting to see whether Neighbors or Melvin Jones continue that trend.

Freshman tailback Leonard Fournette will be another player to watch here, as the nation’s top overall prospect will certainly earn some carries when the Tigers need to move the chains or hammer the ball into the end zone. Fournette and fellow signee Darrel Williams aren’t on campus yet, but the Tigers’ lack of backfield depth means they must be ready to perform once the season arrives.
LSU’s spring practice ended two weeks ago, leaving a full 15 weeks before the Tigers return to the practice field.

The position battles that started in the spring will continue through summer workouts before resuming in front of coaches in August. Let’s take a look at what happened in a few of those spring battles and what we’ll be watching between now and Aug. 30, when the Tigers open the season against Wisconsin.

Defensive tackle: The spring was as much a feeling-out process as anything for defensive line coach Brick Haley. He mostly rode two departed veterans last fall while using youngsters Christian LaCouture and Quentin Thomas in spot duty. LaCouture and Thomas jumped into leading roles during the spring, and Haley also tested Maquedius Bain, Greg Gilmore and Frank Herron (at times) in the middle. Haley has probably established a mental pecking order with the group, but August and the early-season games will certainly play important roles in cementing the coach’s opinions. It will also be worth watching how signees such as Travonte Valentine perform once they arrive on campus, as they might allow Haley to utilize a true rotation in the middle.

[+] EnlargeKendell Beckwith
Derick E. Hingle/USA TODAY SportsSophomore linebacker Kendell Beckwith moved inside and was impressive this spring.
Linebacker: This should be a fun bunch to watch in the fall. While Kwon Alexander, Lamar Louis and D.J. Welter seemed to rank among John Chavis’ first options during the spring, it’s apparent that the Tigers’ defensive coordinator has no shortage of talented options. One of the intriguing spring storylines was Kendell Beckwith’s transition to middle linebacker behind Welter. The linebackers as a group had an excellent spring game, with Ronnie Feist leading all tacklers with 14 stops and both Alexander and Deion Jones picking off Anthony Jennings passes and returning the interceptions for touchdowns. Clifton Garrett is one of the Tigers’ highest-rated 2014 signees, and he could add even more intrigue to the competition for playing time once practice resumes.

Quarterback: Surely you’ve heard by now that the battle between Jennings and freshman Brandon Harris appears to be wide open entering the summer months. Jennings has a slight experience advantage, but Harris was the more effective performer in the spring game. Both players made plenty of mistakes, however. Their offseason preparation in the next few months will be enormously important once August arrives.

Right guard: This is another battle that the coaches said was wide open once the spring concluded. Evan Washington shifted from tackle to guard and seemed to take the leading role in the competition. Fellow senior Fehoko Fanaika and sophomore Ethan Pocic are lurking, however. It wouldn’t be much of a surprise to see all of them play some scrimmage downs against Wisconsin -- or in Weeks 2 and 3 against Sam Houston State and Louisiana-Monroe -- as new offensive line coach Jeff Grimes weighs his options. Coach Les Miles complimented all three players after the spring game, so it seems that the coaches would be comfortable playing any of the candidates.

Safety: Injuries caused this position to remain as a bit of a mystery during the spring. Jalen Mills remained in a starting role, and Ronald Martin seemed to be faring well in a return from a fractured right foot. He was injured again by the end of the spring, however, joining Corey Thompson (knee surgery) on the sideline by the time the spring game rolled around. Mills and Rickey Jefferson were the top options in the spring game, but the Tigers could use any number of combinations when the season arrives -- especially once highly-rated safety prospect Jamal Adams and the other signees make it to Baton Rouge this summer. Once the Tigers are back to full strength in August, this should make for one of the most intriguing position battles.

Tight end: This will be a fun position to track in the fall. They had plenty of playing time last season, but barely made a blip as receivers. They seem to be confident that they will make a more well-rounded contribution in 2014. Sophomore DeSean Smith and signee Jacory Washington possess intriguing receiver skills, and Dillon Gordon, Travis Dickson and Logan Stokes worked this spring to prove that they are well-rounded players at the position. It’s a big group, but all of them should have roles to fill during the season.

Wide receiver: They were the walking wounded for much of the spring, with Avery Peterson, Kevin Spears, John Diarse and Quantavius Leslie all spending time in non-contact jerseys. That was a tough blow for a group that has a lot to prove after Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry, Kadron Boone and James Wright all left the roster after last season. Travin Dural -- who had an outstanding spring game with five catches for 130 yards and two touchdowns -- seemed to solidify his spot as the No. 1 receiving option for now. But this will become one of the Tigers’ most interesting position battles in August once a star-studded signing class, led by Malachi Dupre and Trey Quinn, arrives to challenge the returning wideouts.

Spring cleaning: Logan Stokes

April, 16, 2014
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Editor’s note: With LSU’s spring practice now in the rearview mirror, this week we’ll empty our notebook from the spring and cover a few topics that we weren’t able to hit before the Tigers’ spring game. On Wednesday we focus on a senior who is still learning how to play his position.

BATON ROUGE, La. -- A year ago at this time, not only was Logan Stokes preparing for his rookie season in SEC football, he was also a virtual rookie at his position, tight end.

And yet the junior college transfer played in every game and even started three in LSU’s tight end-heavy offense last fall.

[+] EnlargeLogan Stokes
AP Photo/Gerald HerbertAfter a season spent strictly as a blocker, LSU tight end Logan Stokes is getting some experience in the passing game.
“I started playing tight end my sophomore year in junior college -- and I’m still learning,” said Stokes, who up until that point had played defensive end. “I’m still young at this. I think I may have the least experience at tight end of any of them. This is my second year really playing tight end.”

Stokes had other options when he picked the Tigers more than a year ago, but he knew he’d have a chance to play immediately despite his relative youth at the position. There were only a couple of tight ends on campus when he arrived last January, and all of them -- plus freshman DeSean Smith -- played once the season rolled around.

Stokes played a role as a blocker but never dented the stat sheet with a reception. He made improving as a receiver one of his priorities during spring practice. In fact, Stokes said all of the tight ends worked to diversify their games so they could fill all of the roles required of a well-rounded tight end.

“Obviously DeSean’s more of a deep threat than I am. I’ll just face the facts there,” Stokes joked of Smith, who is enough like a receiver that the Tigers might flex him out into a slot receiver position at times. “I mean, I can get out on the routes and I can do what they ask me to do in the route game and DeSean is getting to where he can do what they want him to do in the blocking. Now when we play teams and we’re in the game, they can’t be like, ‘Oh, they’re running the ball’ or ‘Oh, they’re throwing the ball.’

“Now we can kind of mix it up on people and they won’t know what’s going on. I feel like this year we’ve all been catching balls in the scrimmages and we’ve all been active in all aspects of the game.”

All of them were active in the passing attack during the Tigers’ spring game. Smith caught three passes for 45 yards, including a 19-yard touchdown from Brandon Harris. Dillon Gordon caught two balls for 32 yards and Travis Dickson one for 8. Stokes hardly looked like a guy with limited receiving skills when he went over the middle to make a pretty, 26-yard grab from Anthony Jennings in the second quarter.

“The tight ends you saw involved more [in the spring game] than you’ve seen. I thought our tight ends did an outstanding job,” offensive coordinator Cam Cameron said after the game. “I thought Dillon Gordon did a good job, DeSean Smith really an outstanding spring, Logan Stokes, Travis Dickson, that group. So they’re doing some things today that we enjoyed and I thought our guys did well.”

The Tigers’ tight ends echo Cameron’s optimism and expect their increased involvement to be a trend that lasts beyond the spring, thanks in no small part to the progress they made during the 15 spring workouts.

“I think we’ve had a great spring,” Stokes said. “Everyone’s gotten better at their weaknesses. DeSean’s improved a lot on his blocking, I’ve improved a lot on my receiving game – me and Dillon both. Me and Dillon are both still strong blockers. Travis is good at both. So right now, we’re all working on our weaknesses and we’ve all made improvements.”
BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU is scheduled to hold its final spring walk-through on Tuesday, which will officially send the Tigers into the offseason.

As Les Miles’ club wraps up its 15 spring workouts, here are five things we took away from the last month on the practice field:

[+] EnlargeJennings
Al Messerschmidt/Getty ImagesAnthony Jennings' ability as a running quarterback will be a weapon LSU can utilize this fall.
1. Those QBs can move: Having seen Anthony Jennings play a bit as a freshman, we already knew he had some wiggle. But freshman Brandon Harris looks to be at least his equal in the running-quarterback department after he had 76 rushing yards and a touchdown in last Saturday’s spring game.

Whichever quarterback wins the starting job, it’s a certainty that his playing style will differ wildly from predecessor Zach Mettenberger, who stood like a stone in the pocket. With either Jennings or Harris under center, defenses will have to respect that he can take off and make big plays with his legs.

“Oh boy, isn’t that fun to see?” Miles asked, referring to a 41-yard run that Harris made in the second quarter. “You go back in there and the defense makes a mistake and let me tell you what happened: One of those linebackers went over there to the other side with one of those backs and did not stay home. And so that quarterback came out the back side and suddenly 41 yards later, he’s run out of bounds.

“That’s something you can’t do, either, so when you line up against a quarterback with that kind of ability -- and both of our guys have it -- you’d better keep that linebacker home.”

Jennings still seems to have a tendency to hold on to the ball too long while looking to pass. Iowa sacked him four times in the Outback Bowl, and his defensive teammates got to him four times in the spring game. Harris seemed to have a better idea when to tuck it and run, which doesn’t seem to be a terrible idea for either of them, as they can both be dynamic runners when they leave the pocket.

2. Linebackers will be strong: Saturday was a great day for LSU’s linebackers. Not only did Kwon Alexander and Deion Jones both intercept Jennings' passes and take them to the house for touchdowns, but Ronnie Feist (14 tackles) and Lamar Louis (seven tackles, 0.5 tackle for a loss) were their respective teams’ leading tacklers.

Feist seemed to be everywhere, continuing what Miles said was an impressive spring from a physicality standpoint.

“When he hits you, you’re hit,” Miles said of Feist. “There’s no pretend to it.”

Senior middle linebacker D.J. Welter apparently left a major impression on his coaches this spring as well. Not only was he among the defense’s honorees in awards for leadership and for outstanding performance, but he was the lone winner of the Jimmy Taylor Award, the team’s comprehensive spring award for outstanding leadership, effort and performance.

3. Offensive playmakers still must emerge: It seemed like a foregone conclusion even before spring practice started that some of the team’s top offensive players for 2014 weren’t on campus yet. Spring didn’t do much to change that perception.

Kenny Hilliard and Terrence Magee -- who dealt with a sprained ankle for much of the spring -- were adequate at tailback, but freshman Leonard Fournette will inject some star power to the position once he arrives on campus. Likewise, Malachi Dupre, Trey Quinn and the new receivers will add explosiveness at a position that was riddled with injuries throughout the spring. The receivers were nearly nonexistent in the spring game.

LSU wide receivers totaled seven catches for 200 yards and two touchdowns on Saturday. Sounds pretty good, right? But five of the catches, 130 yards and both touchdowns came from one player: Travin Dural.

Otherwise, the group frequently dropped passes and misplayed catchable balls, proving that they need every bit of the available practice time this summer to develop chemistry with their quarterbacks. Dural looks like a star in the making, but the others have a lot to prove from a consistency standpoint.

4. Tight end talk seems legit: DeSean Smith and the Tigers’ other tight ends expressed hope this spring that they would get more opportunities to catch passes in 2014 than they did last season, when wideouts Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham got most of the looks from Mettenberger.

They said that’s how things had been going in practice, and Saturday looked to continue that trend. Smith led the way with three catches for 45 yards and a touchdown, but Dillon Gordon (2-32), Logan Stokes (1-26), John David Moore (1-20) and Travis Dickson (1-8) also made receptions. In all, the tight ends accounted for eight of the Tigers’ 21 catches in the final spring scrimmage, and offensive coordinator Cam Cameron seems pleased with the weapons he has at his disposal at the position.

“Every year, with different personnel, creates a whole new set of opportunities, and I think the opportunities for our tight ends are going to be critical,” Cameron said. “I was thrilled -- for the most part -- I thought they made the most of it.”

5. Defense is on the comeback: Judging by the way the White team (which featured the starters) throttled the Purple team’s offense on Saturday, it looks like LSU’s first-team defense has the potential to rank among the SEC’s best this fall.

The Purple team accounted for 179 yards of offense on 46 plays -- 53 rushing on 27 carries and 126 passing on 6-for-19 attempts. The Purple converted for a first down just once out of 11 third downs.

After saying earlier in the week that he overthought things in his first season as a starter, defensive end Danielle Hunter seems to have cut loose now. He recorded two sacks on Saturday and was a regular presence in the Purple team’s backfield.

He was only one member of a sizable group of defensive players on both teams who flashed major potential in the scrimmage. Things seem to be looking up for defensive coordinator John Chavis’ bunch.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Asked to describe how an ideal 2014 season might develop for his position group, LSU’s DeSean Smith sets a high bar for the tight ends to attempt to clear.

“I envision of course all of us playing, all of us rotating,” Smith said after Tuesday’s practice. “I see our tight ends with probably seven or eight catches a game -- at least -- just to make that big step now that we’re improving in practice and showing them we can catch and be their go-to targets. We have a great receiving corps, too, so I plan on a lot of people getting a lot of balls, but much more [at tight end] than we got last year.”

For those who expected LSU’s tight ends to receive heavy attention last fall in Year 1 under Cam Cameron -- a noted tight end enthusiast during his decade as an NFL offensive coordinator -- Smith’s projection probably seems comical.

[+] EnlargeCam Cameron
AP Photo/Jonathan BachmanLSU offensive coordinator Cam Cameron is known for getting the tight ends involved and that group expects to have a big role in the offense this season.
The Tigers had three tight ends (Smith, Dillon Gordon and Logan Stokes) play in all 13 games and Travis Dickson appeared in 12. But the four players combined for just 12 catches, 211 yards and zero touchdowns last season.

It wasn’t that the tight end didn’t play an active part in the offense, however, it’s that senior quarterback Zach Mettenberger had two of the nation’s most productive wide receivers in Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry and made full use of their abilities. With Beckham and Landry -- who combined for 136 catches and 2,345 yards last fall -- now chasing NFL dreams, the tight ends believe they will garner more attention from their quarterbacks.

“We had the two best receivers in the country -- that’s what I say, anyway -- and obviously we’re going to push the ball to those guys in game situations,” Stokes said. “But this year, we’re young across the board and we’re looking for playmakers. This spring, we’re starting to find them and some of those playmakers happen to be us.

“When they need us to make a play, DeSean’s made some great plays downfield and me and Dillon have made some nice plays, 10, 15 yards. We’ve had a couple of deep balls this year, too, so we’re definitely going to get more involved this year, I feel like.”

It doesn’t hurt their confidence in making such claims that Cameron has a proven track record of using the tight end. In 10 seasons as an NFL coordinator, his offenses frequently targeted players like Dennis Pitta, Todd Heap and Antonio Gates, who helped usher in a new era of athletic, pass-catching tight ends. Over that 10-year period, Cameron’s top tight end averaged 55 catches for 668 yards and six touchdowns per season.

Obviously it was exciting news to the group, then, that Cameron joined Les Miles’ coaching staff last February.

“First thing, my dad called and told me,” Smith recalled. “Right then, everybody in my family was talking about how he’s a tight end guy. That was pretty neat.”

Now it’s a matter of proving that the group deserves more of an opportunity. That has been a goal this spring, as blocking-oriented players like Stokes work on their pass-catching skills and receiving-oriented tight ends like Smith attempt to become better blockers.

If each member of the group proves he can excel in both areas, LSU’s offense becomes less predictable and more difficult to defend.

“Now when we play teams and we’re in the game, they can’t be like, ‘Oh they’re running the ball’ or ‘Oh they’re throwing the ball.’ Now we can kind of mix it up on people and they won’t know what’s going on,” Stokes said. “I feel like this year we’ve all been catching balls in the scrimmages and we’ve all been active in all aspects of the game.”

They’ll add another member to the group over the summer when signee Jacory Washington on campus. He’ll add another player in the hybrid, pass-catching role of a Smith, as Miles mentioned after a recent spring practice.

“We’ve used them in the past and I think that any time that you have a position that is used to block and he can also receive the ball, it makes a tremendous difference in your attack. And it’s another quality receiver,” Miles said. “I think both DeSean Smith and Jacory Washington will be guys that we’ll use in the fall.”

Since the tight end is involved in essentially every formation the Tigers utilize, expect to see plenty of them on the field this fall -- often two at a time. Whether the group’s reception total rises remains to be seen, but spring is always a time for optimism, and LSU’s tight ends fully believe that their time is coming.

“This year a lot of people have got big shoes to fill, so hopefully we’ll be able to see the tight ends step into that position of being the old tight ends you see in the Cam Cameron offense,” said Dickson, who led LSU’s tight ends with 109 yards on five catches last season. “There’s definitely more opportunities, as much as we use tight ends in our offense. As the season goes on and as a lot of us develop into our key roles, we’ll see what happens.”

LSU position groups to improve: No. 5

February, 10, 2014
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- With more than three weeks to go until LSU opens spring practice on March 7, we'll use some of the down time to review the Tigers' recruiting efforts in recent years and to preview the upcoming series of spring practices.

We begin today with the first installment in a series where we examine five position groups with room to improve. Today's first group is the tight ends.

[+] EnlargeJacory Washington
Courtesy of IntersportESPN 300 tight end Jacory Washington might need time to develop before he sees the field for the Tigers.
5. Tight end

Battling for No. 1: Based on offensive coordinator Cam Cameron's history, many expected LSU to make better use of the tight end as a receiving option in Cameron's first season with the Tigers. That was not to be, as the Tigers used the tight ends almost exclusively as blockers -- same as they had for the last few seasons -- while wideouts Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham contributed the vast majority of the catches and receiving yards. Rising senior tight end Travis Dickson ranked sixth on the team with 109 receiving yards, while rising junior Dillon Gordon (six catches, 88 yards) started 12 of 13 games. With Beckham, Landry and quarterback Zach Mettenberger departed for the NFL, it wouldn't be a big surprise to see the tight ends -- either Dickson, Gordon or one of the younger players on the roster -- play bigger roles as receivers in Year 2 under Cameron.

Strength in numbers: Then-freshman DeSean Smith (one catch, 14 yards) arrived at LSU with plenty of acclaim last year -- he was ESPN's No. 5 tight end and No. 141 overall prospect -- but was not ready to be a starter. He and junior college transfer Logan Stokes appeared in all 13 games, but Smith seems like the candidate to watch for extended playing time as he matures.

New on the scene: New signee Jacory Washington -- who is ranked No. 169 in the ESPN 300 and No. 5 tight end -- seems to have comparable upside to Smith. He could emerge as a receiving weapon in time but needs to add size and become a consistent blocker in order to earn playing time. With all of the key players back from last season, Washington will have to put together a great August to become an immediate contributor. But the athleticism that he and Smith bring to the position group might help the tight end become a more visible element in the passing game over the next couple of seasons.

LSU spring game: What we learned

April, 20, 2013
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Five things we learned in LSU's spring game Saturday, a 37-0 win for White (first-team players) over Purple (various reserves):

1. Mettenberger adjusts: Quarterback Zach Mettenberger completed 12 of 19 passes for 236 yards and two touchdowns, all in the first half, after he evidently adjusted his own game plan.

Offensive coordinator Cam Cameron came up with the idea of allowing the quarterbacks to call their own plays in the spring game, so Mettenberger had some adjustments to make to his own calls.

"It was tough out there," the quarterback said. "Coach Cameron allowed us to call our own plays and it was the first time I've ever done that. It was kind of a slow start to get going, but we turned it around and had a pretty good day."

LSU coach Les Miles said the idea was to allow coaches to get a better feel for each quarterback's preference in certain situations and to allow the quarterbacks to gain a respect, and some insight, in the play-calling process.

"It allows you to see how the quarterback thinks," Miles said. "It allows you to see how he views the game plan, what he would call. I think it was a tremendous exercise."

It didn't get off to a rip-roaring start. Playing against a depleted second-team defense, the White offense managed a single field goal in its first three possessions before threw touchdown passes of 15 and 79 yards from Mettenberger to tight end Dillon Gordon and receiver Odell Beckham on consecutive possessions.

"We turned it around and had a pretty good day," Mettenberger said.

That goes especially for Beckham, who had two touchdown and 202 receiving yards on six catches, and Jarvis Landry, who added 132 yards on six catches.

2. Left out: LSU was without six injured first team players, as the secondary was depleted by injuries that kept out Jalen Collins, Jalen Mills and Ronald Martin. Offensive linemen Elliott Porter and Vadal Alexander also missed the game, as did defensive end Jermauria Rasco.

(Read full post)

BATON ROUGE, La. -- So far, neither junior college transfer in LSU's 2013 signing class has become the obvious starter at their positions.

On the other hand, it looks like the six freshmen who entered college early might already be reaping some rewards from their early entry.

Here is a look at how LSU's eight new players have done after three weeks of spring.

LSU TEs excited by Cameron offense 

March, 22, 2013
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DeSean SmithJohn Albright/Icon SMI2013 TE DeSean Smith is expected to perform well in LSU's new offense.

BATON ROUGE, La. -- When LSU hired Cam Cameron as its new offensive coordinator, tight end Travis Dickson had reason to be excited.

Cameron's reputation for using tight ends in the passing offense preceded him.

"I heard, then I looked into it myself," Dickson said. "And once I saw (the offense) my mind was blown. I couldn't wait to start spring (practice)."

Cameron's offense did, indeed, employ tight ends more in the passing game, not so much because Cameron has a particular infinity for the position where he has enjoyed coaching talent like Antonio Gates and Dennis Pitta, Dickson said. He said it's because Cameron is position agnostic and will cater the offense to its strengths.


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LSU spring football primer

March, 14, 2013
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Here are things to know as LSU starts spring practice:

Practice dates: March 14, 15, 16, 19, 21, 23 (scrimmage), 25, 26 and 28. After spring break, resumes April 9, 11, 13 (scrimmage), 16, 18 and 20 (spring game).

What's new: Offensive coordinator Cam Cameron will install his new offense, and four new starters will man the defensive line.

What's old: The Tigers have eight returning starters on offense, led by quarterback Zach Mettenberger.

Offensive outlook:
Starters returning (8): QB Mettenberger, RB Jeremy Hill, FB J.C. Copeland, WR Jarvis Landry, WR Odell Beckham, LT La'el Collins (moved from left guard), LG Josh Williford (moved from right guard), RG Trai Turner, RT Vadal Alexander.

New starters: TE Dillon Gordon or Logan Stokes, C Elliott Porter. Key reserves -- QB Stephen Rivers, RBs Alfred Blue, Kenny Hilliard and Terrance Magee, FB Connor Neighbors, LT Jerald Hawkins, RG Fehoko Fanaika, RT Ethan Pocic, WR James Wright, Kadron Boone, John Diarse and Travin Dural, TE Travis Dickson.

(Read full post)

Spring preview: Storylines to watch

March, 13, 2013
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As LSU prepares to begin spring practice March 14, GeauxTigerNation will take daily looks at aspects of the spring camp. This is the eighth in the series:

BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU begins springs football practice Thursday with plenty of question marks, from adjusting to a new offensive coordinator to replacing the entire defensive line.

Here are the big story lines as practice gets set to start Thursday and continue until the spring game April 20:

1. What's the Cam Cameron effect? It's really going to be hard to pinpoint the Cameron influence on the offense until the Tigers start taking snaps in games next fall.

But if we start seeing Jeremy Hill taking swing passes from Zach Mettenberger and tight ends getting targeted repeatedly in passing drills, we'll know where that came from.

(Read full post)

Where LSU will need help: Offense 

January, 4, 2013
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- There are some unknown variables when trying to figure out where true freshmen might play a big role on a team.

Avery Johnson
Davide De Pas/ESPN.comClass of 2012 wide receiver Avery Johnson looks to re-enroll after going to prep school for a year. He could contribute to LSU as soon as next season.
Take LSU right tackle Vadal Alexander. The 2012 signee became a true freshman starter at right tackle halfway through the season, something nobody saw coming. But when left tackle Chris Faulk suffered a season-ending knee injury, it opened the door for Alexander to move into the lineup, and he took the job and ran with it after another veteran starting tackle, Alex Hurst, left the team.

Similarly, with a veteran stable of running backs returning, few saw true freshman Jeremy Hill emerging as a primary running back for LSU this year. Yet, it took only one injury -- to original starter Alfred Blue -- to get Hill the break he needed to start getting carries and eventually become the starter and the Tigers' leading rusher.

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Logan Stokes won't drop ball on Tigers 

December, 19, 2012
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Logan Stokes wanted to clear up a misconception about him on the eve of his signing with LSU.

"In my first game in junior college, I made catches but I had to learn how to block," said the sophomore at Northeast Mississippi Community College, who will sign with the Tigers on Wednesday morning before having an informal evening ceremony with teammate Nick Thomason. Stokes said Thomason will sign with Louisiana Tech.

Stokes, a converted high school defensive end, is the only player expected to sign with LSU during the junior college signing period today. Quantavius Leslie, a wide receiver committed to LSU, did not graduate from Hinds Junior College and must return to junior college for the spring semester.

Stokes' comment about his natural receiving ability might come as a revelation to many who have looked at Stokes' modest statistics -- he had just 12 catches in his sophomore season -- and his large frame (6-foot-6, 240 pounds) and assume he's in the mold of current LSU starter Chase Clement, a devastating blocker who rarely gets involved in the passing game.

Stokes said there are other reasons for his lack of production as juco receiver.

"We just could not throw the ball," Stokes said. "We had a weak offensive line that couldn't pass-block very well and our quarterbacks struggled some, too."

As for Stokes, he said he caught it just fine.

"Didn't have one drop," he said.

Indeed, that seems to be the book on Stokes from those who actually covered him. Scouts, including ESPN's own scouting report, noted that he had soft hands and looked comfortable catching the ball. He said he is athletic enough to "flex" out to a wide receiver spot.

"I actually caught a lot of my passes this year doing flexed out," he said.


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Countdown to Signing Day: Logan Stokes 

December, 14, 2012
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To gear up for 2013 national signing day, GeauxTigerNation's Gary Laney will break down every commitment in the Tigers' 2013 recruiting class.

Vitals: TE Logan Stokes, Muscle Shoals, Ala./Northeast Mississippi CC

Committed: May 28, 2012

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