LSU Tigers: Jerry Sandusky

BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU officially added another name to its list of summer departures on Monday when a school spokesman confirmed that senior Rob Bolden intends to transfer.

In addition to the seven Tigers who sacrificed their remaining eligibility in order to enter the 2014 NFL draft, four others have announced plans to transfer, including defensive end Jordan Allen (Arizona) and quarterbacks Stephen Rivers (Vanderbilt) and Hayden Rettig (Rutgers). Now Bolden becomes the third player capable of lining up under center who has opted to continue his career elsewhere.

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Ronald Martinez/Getty ImagesRob Bolden is the third player capable of playing quarterback to transfer from LSU this offseason.
Bolden played receiver this spring after spending the past two seasons as a backup quarterback at LSU -- he never appeared in an actual game -- and the two seasons before that as a part-time starting quarterback at Penn State. He transferred to LSU in 2012 in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky investigation.

Had he remained at LSU, he would have been one of the most veteran players at whichever position he played. Of the nine wideouts listed on the preseason depth chart LSU released Monday, Quantavius Leslie is the only senior, there are no juniors and Travin Dural is the only sophomore.

Bolden attempted to put a positive spin on his shift to receiver during the spring, but obviously something changed since then. A report on Monday by SpartanNation.com had the Michigan native transferring to Eastern Michigan in order to play quarterback.

LSU's more pressing issue now is at quarterback, where the trio's departure leaves sophomore Anthony Jennings and Brandon Harris as the only scholarship players and walk-ons Brad Kragthorpe, Jake Clise and Brandon Bergeron as reserves.

That isn't necessarily a nightmare scenario so long as Jennings and Harris stay healthy this fall. LSU used only two quarterbacks -- senior Zach Mettenberger and Jennings -- all of last season, even though Mettenberger dealt with minor injuries for a portion of the fall before suffering a season-ending knee injury in the regular-season finale against Arkansas.

It obviously helped from a continuity standpoint that Mettenberger was a fifth-year senior who possessed extensive college experience and an NFL-level skillset. Jennings and Harris are both early in their developmental cycle, which already leaves LSU with little breathing room at the position even before potential injuries enter the equation.

LSU's coaches made it clear during the spring that Jennings and Harris are their top two options -- hence the departures of the three backup quarterbacks -- so Bolden would have been nothing more than an emergency option as long as the youngsters stayed upright. But he would have been an awfully useful emergency option.

In 2010, Bolden became the first true freshman quarterback to start a game at Penn State in 100 years and he went on to start 17 games between that season and the next before transferring to LSU. Backup quarterbacks with that kind of major-conference experience aren't particularly plentiful, and now LSU has decided to spend his last season of eligibility elsewhere.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Let’s get this out of the way first: Rob Bolden might be playing receiver now, but he hasn’t completely abandoned the idea of playing quarterback.

“I’m still open to quarterback,” he said last week, only a few days into his first-ever attempt at playing wideout. “I want to play quarterback and any time that they would need me, I’m willing to switch back and forth or whatever.”

Bolden is also a realist, though. He sees the writing on the wall -- most likely, LSU will pick between dual-threat quarterbacks Anthony Jennings or Brandon Harris as the starter -- and knows that playing receiver might be his best chance to get on the field during his senior season.

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Ronald Martinez/Getty ImagesRob Bolden knows it's unlikely he will be at quarterback for LSU this coming season.
So for the first time in his life -- Bolden said he played safety, tight end and quarterback as youth football player, but never receiver -- he’s attempting to become the guy who catches the passes instead of the guy who throws them.

“It’s just going to take a little extra, just after practice, doing a little bit with Coach [Adam Henry, LSU’s receivers coach],” Bolden said. “He’s going to coach me up and show me how to do all the stuff that I need to learn.”

Catching the ball doesn’t appear to be a problem. In his first practice at receiver, Bolden turned heads with a one-handed catch. At 6-foot-4 and 209 pounds, overpowering cornerbacks who try to jam him at the line of scrimmage probably won’t be an issue, either.

“He’s pretty big,” receiver Travin Dural chuckled. “I was telling him some techniques about how to get off the jam and he was like, ‘I’m bigger than all the cornerbacks and I’m stronger, so I can just throw them around.'”

Not that brute force is a completely effective method.

“It’s a little bit of that, but at the same time, you’ve got to learn how to use your hands, which [at last Tuesday’s practice] I kind of struggled with that,” Bolden said. “But once I learn, I’m sure -- I’m a big, strong guy and that won’t really faze me at all.”

It’s still extremely early in Bolden’s transition, so any predictions of future stardom would be premature. Understandably, LSU’s coaches are taking a wait-and-see attitude as he learns the ins and outs at his new position.

“He’s taking some snaps at receiver and it appears to be a pretty good move,” LSU coach Les Miles said. “He made a couple nice catches [in the first spring practice]. Yeah, it’ll be interesting to see how he performs.”

Such a move is not unprecedented. For example, Kodi Burns shifted from wideout at Auburn in 2009 when he lost a quarterback competition against Chris Todd. Burns became a valuable role player and even caught a touchdown pass against Oregon in the BCS title game the following season.

As it was with Burns, one thing that should ease Bolden’s transition is that he has a quarterback’s working knowledge of the offensive scheme. He already knew how the various receivers’ routes complemented each other in the passing game and thinks he might be able to help players at his new position gain a better understanding of what a quarterback sees on different plays.

“It’s a great opportunity with me knowing the offense the way that I do,” Bolden said. “I know it like a quarterback, so I know the thought process of it, I know the reads, I know everything. So I may be able to help some of the other guys out as far as lining up and doing all that type of stuff.

“You know a lot of stuff that a lot of other guys wouldn’t. Being in there with [offensive coordinator Cam Cameron], you’re going to learn the offense in and out -- this way, that way, every type of way. That’s going to benefit me a lot. The only thing that I will have to really learn is how to run certain routes and that type of stuff.”

Bolden certainly has spent enough time in quarterback meeting rooms to develop that knowledge base. He’s entering his fifth season in college -- and his third at LSU -- although he hasn’t appeared in a game since 2011. At the time he was at Penn State, where he started 17 games as a freshman and sophomore before transferring to LSU in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal.

He has only watched from the sidelines at LSU, redshirting in 2012 and backing up Zach Mettenberger last season. Even when Mettenberger suffered a season-ending knee injury late last fall, Miles’ staff turned to then-freshman Jennings to start against Iowa in the Outback Bowl, which offers some insight into where Bolden sat in the quarterback pecking order.

So now he’s a wideout, and his new position mates are willing to teach Bolden the ins and outs of the job. Considering how the Tigers lost their most experienced and productive wideouts in Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry, Kadron Boone and James Wright, Bolden should have more than enough opportunity to gain some experience this spring.

LSU signed four receivers whom ESPN ranked among the nation’s top 300 prospects -- led by No. 1 wideout Malachi Dupre and No. 3 Trey Quinn -- but those signees won’t arrive on campus until this summer. For now, Bolden is the newest member of an inexperienced receiving corps, and his fellow receivers are trying to encourage him that wideout is a position where he can be successful.

“It was kind of funny seeing him put on gloves and catch balls with us, but I just took him in just like he’s any other guy,” redshirt freshman John Diarse said. “Any little question he has, I try to answer to the best of my knowledge and just try to keep him encouraged that, ‘You’re an athlete. You can do anything you put your mind to.’ So I’m trying to keep him going here."

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