LSU Tigers: Connor Neighbors

LSU notes: Miles talks ULM upsets

September, 8, 2014
Sep 8
5:00
PM ET
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Les Miles is already playing the Arkansas and Alabama card -- as in the two SEC teams that have lost games to LSU's opponent on Saturday, Louisiana-Monroe.

ULM beat No. 8 Arkansas early in the 2012 season that was anything but memorable for a Razorbacks program in post-Bobby Petrino turmoil. And the Warhawks toppled Alabama in 2007, Nick Saban's first season with the Crimson Tide.

As of Monday afternoon, LSU is favored by 31 points against ULM, but Miles said history shows that his team must be prepared for a challenge.

"We are so warned," Miles said at his Monday press luncheon. "We recognize and respect that opponent. We will prepare for their best efforts."

Injury updates: Several Tigers are nursing injuries after the first two games, although Miles offered positive news on that front.

Junior linebacker Kwon Alexander said he will be ready to play Saturday after playing only two defensive series in last Saturday's 56-0 win against Sam Houston State after reaggravating a right neck/shoulder stinger he first suffered in the opener against Wisconsin.

"It's just he was bruised up a little bit and we feel like with some quiet time he'll be fine," Miles said.

Miles said sophomore center Ethan Pocic should also be available Saturday after getting hurt against SHSU, although he added that senior Elliott Porter will be back in the starting lineup following a two-game suspension to start the season. Andy Dodd played most of the second half in Pocic's place on Saturday.

Senior fullback Connor Neighbors entered the SHSU game wearing a club cast covering his entire right hand and left the game with a foot injury, but Miles said he should also be good to go on Saturday.

"He had a very difficult time catching the ball with that club on his hand. So I would think that what that was was a little wrist sprain. That will be replaced by a very mobile and agile hand for this next Saturday," Miles said. "His injuries other than that are improved and we would expect him to play and start."

In addition, senior tight end Logan Stokes was wearing a walking boot on his foot when he arrived at LSU's practice facility on Monday.

Garrett will play: LSU has already played 16 true freshmen, but one of them isn't Clifton Garrett, ESPN's No. 31 overall prospect and No. 2 inside linebacker in the 2014 signing class.

Miles predicted that could change soon.

"We expect that he'll play a good portion of the remainder of the time. We think that he came in … [and] needed an adjustment period with the weather and the heat here," Miles said. "Once he got his feet underneath him, he's really improved and we would expect that he play not only this Saturday, but Saturdays as we go forward."

Alexander said Garrett is still learning what to do behind D.J. Welter and Kendell Beckwith at middle linebacker.

"He should be ready to get in," Alexander said. "He's just learning the plays right now. When he gets the plays down pat, I think he'll get in."

Ranking receivers: Miles included Travin Dural, freshman Trey Quinn and John Diarse among the Tigers' top three wide receivers and added that freshmen Malachi Dupre and D.J. Chark as players who could join that group.

Both Dupre and Chark made their college debuts against SHSU, with Dupre also catching a fourth-quarter touchdown after missing the Wisconsin game with an injury.

Miles predicted Dupre could have an expanded role moving forward.

"There's no question that his skillset fits in very well -- tall, athletic, explosive, great ball skills," Miles said. "We're going to have to get him onto the field and he feels much healthier than he's felt. He's not limited in any way."

Versatile Washington: Senior offensive lineman Evan Washington played right and left guard against SHSU after coming off the bench at right tackle against Wisconsin.

He's actually a backup at every offensive line position, which can make things confusing at times.

"I've got a lot more in my head," Washington said. "I've got like three positions in my head. Sometimes in practice Coach [Jeff] Grimes will be like, ‘Why did you do that?' and I'm like, ‘Oh I forgot, Coach. I thought I was at another position.' "

Predominantly a tackle early in his career, Washington said he started learning all of the line positions from teammate T-Bob Hebert as a freshman and picked up pointers from Trai Turner last season about playing guard.

It took time before he felt comfortable shifting from spot to spot.

"I couldn't have done it my first two years, but after a while I was comfortable enough knowing what everybody was doing," Washington said. "Then just the little technique stuff helped me out."
BATON ROUGE, La. -- A good fullback deserves a good nickname, and you won't find one much better than that of LSU's Connor Neighbors: Bone Saw.

[+] EnlargeConnor Neighbors
David Ching/ESPNIt's easy to identify LSU senior fullback Connor "Bone Saw" Neighbors among a crowd -- just look for the beard.
For those unfamiliar with superhero movies, Bone Saw was a character played by the professional wrestler "Macho Man" Randy Savage in "Spider-Man" starring Tobey Maguire. In their scene, Maguire's character used his Spidey powers to beat Savage's character in a wrestling match to the dismay of Bone Saw's many rabid fans gathered around the ring. (To get a better visual, find it on YouTube.)

"If you see the scene, it's pretty intense," said Neighbors, LSU's senior fullback. "This guy's talking a lot of smack to Spider-Man and the people in the stands have got makeshift saws and they're [acting like they are sawing their forearms]."

Fullbacks are often an unusual breed, but Neighbors seems particularly different from the normal SEC football player. He played ice hockey growing up in Huntsville, Alabama, until his junior year of high school. He said he listens to Limp Bizkit as his hype music before games. And he's currently sporting a shaved head and a mountain man beard to "just express myself in a different way."

A guy like that needs a good nickname, so it was fortunate he gained a little inspiration from the Macho Man several years back.

Neighbors started jokingly going by the nickname around friends such as Zach Mettenberger and Sam Montgomery during his freshman year, and it eventually made its way to the Tigers' strength and conditioning staff. One day Neighbors celebrated a particularly satisfying achievement in the weight room by doing the fans' sawing "Bone Saw" hand motion and the nickname spread to the point that it's now what he goes by among teammates.

"One day we were maxing out in the weight room and I was attempting 364 [pounds] on power cleans, so I did it and I dropped down and almost dropped the bar completely," Neighbors said. "But somehow I got my form back and I lifted it up and I [sawed my forearm], like the whole Bone Saw thing, and it just kind of stuck."

Not that it always feels like a positive thing -- for instance, when a teammate drops the nickname around a member of the opposite sex.

"When we're out and about and people say that, girls look at me like, 'What does that mean?' I'm just like, 'Uh, my name's Connor,'" Neighbors laughed.

Apparently when your nickname is Bone Saw, you can't choose when it applies. You're Bone Saw 24/7, for better or worse. Might as well make the best of it.

"I didn't think that it would get out to the media, but since it has, I'll embrace it," Neighbors said. "I like it a lot."

He joked that some LSU fans could even take the nickname to the next level, perhaps mimicking the fans surrounding the wrestling ring with signs and homemade cardboard saws during the movie scene.

"That'd be great," Neighbors said. "In the movie, the 'Macho Man' Randy Savage says, 'I've got you for three minutes. Three minutes of play time.' You've got to look it up. He's just talking smack the whole time. I guess people could just make signs or something, get the saws, I don't know."

In other words, get creative. When the subject is a guy who goes by Bone Saw, the possibilities are seemingly endless -- especially within the nutty confines of Tiger Stadium.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- The LSU Tigers lost one the few veterans on its interior defensive line in the first week of preseason camp when Quentin Thomas tore a bicep on Wednesday.

LSU sports information director Michael Bonnette confirmed that Thomas had suffered an injury after the fourth-year junior missed practice on Thursday and Friday, but the Baton Rouge Advocate reported that he is expected to miss the season.

"With him going down, he's a great friend of mine [and] I felt terrible when I heard about it," sophomore defensive tackle Christian LaCouture said after Friday morning's practice. "Somebody's got to step up."

LaCouture and Thomas were listed as starting tackles on LSU's preseason depth chart, although they have only one start between them. Thomas started in place of Ego Ferguson in last season's Outback Bowl when Ferguson did not play in the game. He finished last season with nine tackles in 11 games.

Thomas redshirted in 2011 and contributed in a minimal role in 2012. He finally saw the field a bit last season and said earlier this week that he was excited to have a chance to truly make an impact.

"Redshirting and not playing as much for the past few years has helped me learn my plays and put me in a better position for when they do give me my chance, I'll be able to perform well," Thomas said after Monday's first preseason practice.

Now it looks like it will be a while before Thomas gets that chance, which his coach at Breaux Bridge (La.) High School, Paul Broussard, admitted would be a major disappointment for his former player.

"He had worked hard, waited his turn and bided his time and finally had his chance to start," said Broussard, who had not yet spoken to Thomas a couple of hours after the news broke Friday. "I know it has to be devastating for him."

The Tigers now must lean more heavily on a trio of defensive tackles: Frank Herron (LSU coach Les Miles described as "a beast" earlier this week), Greg Gilmore and Maquedius Bain . All three redshirted last season after arriving at LSU as ESPN 300 honorees in 2013.

Additionally, LSU might get some good news about 2014 signee Travonte Valentine soon. Champagnat Catholic (Fla.) coach Mike Tunsil told TigerSportsDigest.com that he expects the NCAA Clearinghouse to permit Valentine to enroll at LSU next Tuesday. Valentine was ESPN's No. 164 overall prospect in the 2014 class and the No. 11 defensive tackle.

Regardless of whether Valentine contributes this fall, the interior line will still feature mostly inexperienced players. The next several weeks of practice will help determine which players figure heavily into defensive line coach Brick Haley's plans.

"Even though I'm a sophomore, I'm trying to be an upperclassman and trying to help with the young guys. A lot of them have to play," LaCouture said. "With everything going on, we're just trying to figure out who's ready to play. I thought we had a great day today."

Thompson playing it smart: Safety Corey Thompson said his surgically repaired knee is completely healthy, but he's still trying to be smart in his return to the field.

"I took limited reps today, but the first few practices, I got them all, I got it in," Thompson said after Friday's first practice in full pads. "So just trying to get back in shape is my main thing."

Thompson missed spring practice following surgery to repair the ACL he tore last season against Texas A&M. He's in the mix to return to the starting lineup this fall -- he had started five of the last six games last season when he went down against the Aggies -- although LSU lists him behind Rickey Jefferson on the preseason depth chart.

Thompson said he expects all of the returning veterans -- a group that also includes Jalen Mills and Ronald Martin -- to contribute this season, as could freshmen Jamal Adams, John Battle and Devin Voorhies.

"We're just trying to teach the freshmen, make sure they understand, because they're going to get some play, too," Thompson said. "So we know that everybody's going to play, everybody's good enough to play, so we're all rotating."

Absences and graduations: Center Elliott Porter was among the Tigers who were absent from Friday's practice periods that were open to the media. The senior sport administration major participated in summer commencement exercises Friday morning at LSU's Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

Porter was one of three current players -- along with fullback Connor Neighbors and Justin Maclin -- to graduate Friday, as did former Tigers Rob Bolden, Richard Murphy and Karnell Hatcher.

Among the other Tigers who were not present during Friday's practice periods that were open to the media: receiver Malachi Dupre, linebacker Clifton Garrett and cornerback Rashard Robinson.

LSU position breakdown: RB

July, 29, 2014
Jul 29
10:00
AM ET
Editor’s note: This week, we’ll take a quick look at each of LSU’s position groups as the Tigers prepare to open preseason practice next week. Up next are the running backs.

RUNNING BACK

Returning starters: Fullback Connor Neighbors (7 catches, 92 yards in 2013). Neighbors started seven of the last eight games after overtaking J.C. Copeland at fullback. He figures to share time with converted linebacker Melvin Jones (1 catch, 7 yards, TD) this fall.

Starters lost: Running back Jeremy Hill. After rushing for 1,401 yards and setting an SEC record for a back with at least 200 carries with 6.9 yards per carry, Hill turned pro and went to the Cincinnati Bengals in the second round of the draft. He ended the season by rushing for a career-high 216 yards in the Outback Bowl win against Iowa.

Key newcomers: No. 1 overall prospect Leonard Fournette and running back Darrel Williams (three stars, No. 77 running back) both joined the team this summer. Fournette should make an instant impact, while Williams could also contribute in the Tigers’ depth-deprived backfield alongside seniors Terrence Magee (626 rushing yards, 8 TDs) and Kenny Hilliard (310-7).

Player to watch: Fournette. The New Orleans native is arguably the most heavily hyped prospect ever to enroll at LSU, with comparisons to no less than Minnesota Vikings superstar Adrian Peterson following him to college. He brings an impression of size, power and speed to the position, so all the tools are there. LSU’s coaches and veteran backs will unquestionably need to help manage the freshman and the expectations he faces, since few players must deal with this level of fan excitement so early in their careers.

Overall: Magee averaged a whopping 7.3 yards per carry last season and Hilliard has always been an effective power back, so the Tigers have a pair of solid seniors who can help ease the youngsters’ path into college. The big question is how much the freshmen will add to the backfield. LSU fans will probably be disappointed with anything less than immediate stardom for Fournette, while Williams -- a 2,000-yard rusher last season as a high school senior -- has the ability to join the backfield timeshare as a rookie. LSU’s backfield depth is not ideal, which is part of the reason that Jones played some tailback during spring practice, but as long as they avoid any major injuries, the Tigers should be OK on that front.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- In April, we broke down how LSU's offense led the nation in third-down efficiency last season by converting for a first down or touchdown 57.1 percent of the time.

The three key names in that endeavor were quarterback Zach Mettenberger, receiver Jarvis Landry and tailback Jeremy Hill -- all of whom ranked among the nation's most clutch third-down performers. All three are in the NFL now, however, so it will be important for LSU to identify new players capable of keeping drives alive on those all-important downs.

Let's take a look at what could become the key factors in LSU's attempt to remain successful on third down.

Quarterback efficiency, running ability

[+] EnlargeZach Mettenberger
AP Photo, Cal Sport MediaLSU will have a hard time matching the success on third down of departed quarterback Zach Mettenberger.
One of the two April posts focused on the need for the Tigers' quarterbacks to play efficiently. Let's face it, whoever wins the starting job -- whether it's freshman Brandon Harris or sophomore Anthony Jennings -- he's not going to zing third-down completions like Mettenberger did last year.

The fifth-year senior's 96.7 Total Quarterback Rating on third down trailed only that of Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston (96.9) among FBS quarterbacks. Mettenberger was 58-for-89 for 974 yards, nine touchdowns and one interception on third down according to ESPN Stats & Information. Of those 58 completions, 21 went for 20 yards or more -- a total that was second only to Louisville's Teddy Bridgewater (22).

Talented though they may be, a green freshman and a sophomore with one shaky start under his belt are not going to match that kind of passing production. As LSU offensive coordinator Cam Cameron indicated after the Tigers' spring game, they'll have to play it smart early in possessions in order to keep the offense in manageable down-and-distance situations.

Give the young quarterbacks this, though: both of them have an ability that Mettenberger simply does not possess, and it will almost certainly come in handy this fall. Both are good runners, so don't be surprised to see designed runs -- and scrambles after plays break down -- that result in first downs.

Jennings was credited with six rushing attempts on third downs last season, with two of them achieving first downs and another achieving a touchdown. Harris showed off some impressive wheels in LSU's spring game, rushing three times on third down for 45 yards and a touchdown. We'll certainly see more of that in 2014 than when the slow-footed Mettenberger was under center.

Filling Landry's shoes

The question isn't which LSU player replaces Landry's absurd production on third down. It's highly unlikely that one player will do that -- not this fall anyhow -- seeing as how Landry ranked third in the FBS in third-down receptions (28), second in receiving yards (474) and tied for first with six touchdown catches according to ESPN Stats & Information.

2013 FBS Leaders
Third-down receptions
35 -- Jace Amaro, Texas Tech
30 -- Justin Hardy, East Carolina
28 -- Jarvis Landry, LSU
27 -- Allen Robinson, Penn State
26 -- Willie Snead, Ball State

Third-down receiving yards
478 -- Jace Amaro, Texas Tech
474 -- Jarvis Landry, LSU
432 -- Shaun Joplin, Bowling Green
407 -- Ty Montgomery, Stanford
402 -- Antwan Goodley, Baylor

[+] EnlargeTravin Dural
AP Photo/Bill HaberTravin Dural caught the game-winning touchdown against Arkansas on third down.
LSU has only one returning wide receiver who was even targeted with a third-down pass last season -- Travin Dural caught 5 of 11 third-down passes where he was the intended target and scored two touchdowns, including the game winner against Arkansas -- so it would make sense for the Tigers to spread around the opportunities more evenly this fall.

But who will get those chances?

Dural is a given, followed by lots of uncertainty. Freshmen like John Diarse, Malachi Dupre, Trey Quinn, D.J. Chark and Tony Upchurch will be in the mix, but it's possible that the quarterbacks will look more often to players at other positions.

Using veterans at TE, RB in passing game

Since the receiving corps is loaded with inexperience, a good alternative might be the positions where the Tigers return some experience.

They're extremely deep at tight end, and one of the talking points of LSU's spring practice was about how the position should be more active this season.

Last season, the Tigers targeted the tight end 10 times on third down, but came away with only three completions for 35 yards and one first down. In other words, this will be a two-way street. The tight ends must hold onto the ball consistently if the quarterbacks are to look their way more often.

If LSU's spring game was any indication, the chances will be there. Jennings and Harris targeted tight ends on four of their 12 third-down passes, with DeSean Smith catching two of them for 36 yards and a touchdown.

Likewise, tailback Terrence Magee made it a point this spring that he'd like to catch more balls out of the backfield this fall. The former receiver could be dangerous as a third-down target judging by his three receptions for 46 yards in that role last season.

Fullback Connor Neighbors (one catch on two targets for 4 yards and a first down in 2013) could also become more of a factor in the passing games now that he's taking over for J.C. Copeland in the backfield.

Who handles the backfield workload?

Hill was arguably the nation's most explosive third-down back in 2013, leading the FBS with an average of 13.28 yards per carry on third down according to ESPN Stats & Information. Although dozens of players carried the ball more times on third down than Hill's 18 attempts, he ranked 10th nationally with 239 yards thanks in large part to his touchdown runs of 37, 49 and 69 yards.

2013 FBS Leaders
Third-down yards per carry
13.28 -- Jeremy Hill, LSU (18-239)
11.92 -- Kenneth Dixon, Louisiana Tech (13-155)
10.76 -- Duke Johnson, Miami (17-183)
10.50 -- Larry Dixon, Army (12-126)
10.20 -- Tevin Coleman, Indiana (10-102)

Seniors Magee (eight carries, 44 yards, three first downs, one touchdown in 2013) and Kenny Hilliard (eight carries, 36 yards, two first downs, two touchdowns) have handled short-yardage duty well in limited work, but the X-factors might be freshmen Leonard Fournette and Darrel Williams.

ESPN's No. 1 overall prospect for 2014, Fournette has LSU fans drooling over his combination of size, power and breakaway speed. He'll almost certainly play a leading role on third down -- and in every other type of running situation -- early in his college career. And Williams was no slouch himself as a prep star, rushing for 2,201 yards and 32 touchdowns as a senior at John Ehret High School in Marrero, Louisiana.

It's possible that LSU could use all four tailbacks in some capacity, similar to a 2011 backfield that utilized Hilliard, Spencer Ware, Michael Ford and Alfred Blue. Ware led the Tigers with 92 yards on 25 third-down rushing attempts that year, while Blue (16 carries for 85 yards) and Ford (13 carries for 77 yards) led the way with two touchdown runs apiece.

With inexperience at quarterback and receiver and a next-level talent like Fournette joining the backfield, conventional wisdom indicates that LSU will lean heavily on its veteran offensive line and the ground game, especially on third downs. The previously mentioned factors will certainly play an enormous role in LSU's attempt to remain effective on third down, but this might be a season where the rushing attack is the most important element in keeping the chains moving.
Editor’s note: On Thursday, we examined LSU’s success on third down last season (the Tigers led the nation by converting 57.1 percent of the time) and the importance the quarterbacks will play in remaining successful. Today we explore how much production the Tigers must replace at the skill positions in order to remain effective on third down.

BATON ROUGE, La. -- Among ESPN’s top-10 quarterback prospects for the upcoming NFL draft, LSU’s Zach Mettenberger posted the best third-down conversion percentage (53.7) of the bunch.

Certainly it helped that Mettenberger possesses a cannon for a right arm and the experience that comes with being a fifth-year senior. But even Mettenberger would agree that he greatly benefited from the freakish playmaking abilities of receivers Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham and tailback Jeremy Hill.

That foursome helped LSU lead all FBS teams with a 57.1-percent conversion rate on third down last season, but now all four are waiting to hear their names called in next month’s NFL draft.

That leaves offensive coordinator Cam Cameron and the other offensive assistants with the burden of replacing some incredibly productive players who were often at their best on third down.

On Thursday, we looked at the role young quarterbacks Anthony Jennings and Brandon Harris will play in LSU’s third-down fortunes in the fall. We’ll do a bit more of that in a second, plus we’ll examine LSU’s third-down production at receiver and running back in an effort to identify which returning players have the most experience at keeping drives alive by achieving all-important first downs.

Mettenberger was outstanding on third down last season, averaging 16.6 yards per completion and throwing only one interception against nine touchdowns. That’s going to be nearly impossible for either Jennings or Harris to duplicate this season, but it should help that the two youngsters have the ability to run as well as throw.

Mettenberger hung out in the pocket as if his sneakers were made of lead, but Jennings and Harris are both quick enough to move the chains on the run. Harris, in particular, showed his speed in the Tigers’ spring game with a 41-yard run, and he also converted for a first down or touchdown on six of the last eight times he was under center on a third down.

Jennings struggled in that department in the spring game, with the offense converting for a first down just once in his seven attempts on third down. He also threw an interception that linebacker Deion Jones returned for a 67-yard touchdown on a third down.

Mettenberger should send a thank you note to Landry for all the times he made a clutch grab to extend a drive or end one with a touchdown. The junior wideout made a catch on 28 of the 35 times he was targeted, with 20 of the receptions earning a first down and six more going for a touchdown. He finished the season with 474 receiving yards and an average of 16.9 yards per catch on third down alone.

Beckham’s solid numbers are unfairly overshadowed by Landry’s, as Beckham caught a pass on 15 of the 25 times he was targeted on third down, gaining 272 yards in the process. Thanks to a pair of penalties against defenders, LSU actually picked up more first downs (16) on passes in which Beckham was targeted than there were instances when he actually caught the ball (15). He averaged 18.1 yards per catch on third down.

LSU’s problem is that only two of its top six third-down targets will be back this fall. Travin Dural (five catches, 97 yards, two touchdowns on third down) returns, but wideout Kadron Boone (four catches, 93 yards and two touchdowns) and tailback Alfred Blue (three catches, 46 yards) are both gone.

It wouldn’t be a surprise to see tailback Terrence Magee (three catches, 46 yards), tight ends such as DeSean Smith, Travis Dickson and Dillon Gordon and fullback Connor Neighbors play more active roles on third down in Landry's and Beckham’s absence. The Tigers might also lean heavily on a new crop of receivers (including redshirt freshman John Diarse and signees Malachi Dupre and Trey Quinn) on key downs once the season begins.

Hill was superb when Cameron called his number on third down last season, averaging 13.2 yards per carry and achieving either a first down or a touchdown 13 times in 18 tries. Included in that fairly small collection of carries was a 49-yard touchdown on a third-down run against Auburn, a 69-yard burst for a score against Mississippi State and a 37-yard score that put away the Tigers’ Outback Bowl victory over Iowa.

Magee and Kenny Hilliard, meanwhile, posted fairly pedestrian numbers in limited work on third down. Both players receieved eight carries on third down, with Magee achieving three first downs and two touchdowns (he also lost a fumble) and Hilliard getting two first downs and two touchdowns.

The fullback typically earns some short-yardage carries in LSU’s offense – senior J.C. Copeland picked up two first downs and scored twice in four carries on third down – so it will be interesting to see whether Neighbors or Melvin Jones continue that trend.

Freshman tailback Leonard Fournette will be another player to watch here, as the nation’s top overall prospect will certainly earn some carries when the Tigers need to move the chains or hammer the ball into the end zone. Fournette and fellow signee Darrel Williams aren’t on campus yet, but the Tigers’ lack of backfield depth means they must be ready to perform once the season arrives.
Editor’s note: Today and tomorrow, we’ll take a look at LSU’s success on third down last season -- the Tigers led the nation by converting 57.1 percent of the time -- and the obstacles Cam Cameron’s offense will face in its attempt to remain similarly efficient this fall.

BATON ROUGE, La. -- Cam Cameron used a golf analogy to describe his quarterbacks’ nonchalance when LSU’s offense faced third-down situations during spring practice. Clearly the Tigers' offensive coordinator has yet to see the young quarterbacks execute at a Tiger Woods level, unlike their predecessor Zach Mettenberger.

“The biggest thing that young quarterbacks have to learn is that if you don’t convert on third down, you’re going to go sit down,” Cameron said. “In practice, it’s almost like they’re at the driving range hitting a bucket of balls: ‘Ah, I missed that one. I’ll put another one down.’ Well, playing quarterback is not like hitting a bucket of balls. You go three-and-out, you’re sitting down watching.”

[+] EnlargeAnthony Jennings
Crystal LoGiudice/USA TODAY Sports Anthony Jennings excelled on third down in his limited playing time last season but struggled mightily on third down in LSU's spring game.
LSU’s veteran-heavy offense was the best in the nation on third down last fall, converting for a first down or touchdown 57.1 percent of the time (92 of 161). LSU was one of nine teams to convert at least half the time and one of just two in the SEC -- trailing the Tigers were Texas A&M (50.3 percent) and Alabama (47.6).

But the Tigers posted those numbers with a fifth-year senior, Mettenberger, under center, with veterans Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham Jr. at receiver and NFL-bound Jeremy Hill at tailback. That group of recently departed stars posted eye-popping numbers in general, particularly on third down (more on that tomorrow).

Mettenberger threw 94 passes on third downs, completing 59 of them for a total of 978 yards. Of those passes, 44 resulted in a first down, and nine more went for touchdowns. Mettenberger tossed only one interception and was sacked six times in such situations.

Then-freshman quarterback Anthony Jennings also posted solid third-down statistics in a significantly smaller sample size, although his 49-yard touchdown pass to Travin Dural in the waning moments against Arkansas accounted for nearly half of his yardage total. Jennings was 5-for-11 on third downs for 120 yards, with four of the completions going for a first down and the one to Dural accounting for a game-winning score. He also tossed a third-down interception in his lone start, the Outback Bowl win against Iowa.

One threat that both Jennings and freshman Brandon Harris present that Mettenberger didn’t is their ability to move the chains by running for first downs. On the three third downs that Jennings attempted to run last season, he achieved two first downs and a touchdown. And Harris proved in the spring game that he might be even more dangerous as a scrambler.

“One of those linebackers went over there to the other side with one of those backs and did not stay home,” LSU coach Les Miles said of a 41-yard Harris run in the second quarter of the Tigers’ spring game. “And so that quarterback came out the back side and suddenly 41 yards later, he’s run out of bounds. That’s something you can’t do, either, so when you line up against a quarterback with that kind of ability -- and both of our guys have it -- you’d better keep that linebacker home.”

If the trends from LSU’s spring game carry over into the fall, Jennings would almost certainly be the quarterback who is sitting down and watching in Cameron’s analogy. The rising sophomore struggled mightily on third down, while early enrollee Harris made some of the day’s most exciting plays in those situations.

Jennings was under center for seven third downs, and only one of them resulted in a first down: a 3-yard run by fullback Connor Neighbors. Jennings was 0-for-3 passing on third down and tossed an interception that linebacker Deion Jones returned 67 yards for a touchdown.

On the other hand, Harris overcame a sluggish start -- the offense failed to convert on third down on any of Harris’ first five attempts -- to finish with a flourish. The Harris-led offense converted six of the final eight third downs, including three touchdowns: a 19-yard pass to tight end DeSean Smith, a 21-yard rainbow to Dural on the final play of the opening half, and a 4-yard touchdown run of his own.

In all, LSU’s offense gained 115 yards in 13 plays when Harris was on the field for third down and lost three yards in the seven times that Jennings was under center -- and that doesn’t include the 67 going the wrong direction for a score on Jones’ interception.

Harris had a hot streak in the second quarter where five of six plays on third down went for either a first down or a touchdown. It’s no coincidence, Cameron said, that only once in those instances did he face third-and-10 or longer -- a down-and-distance scenario that his starting quarterback must avoid if LSU’s youthful 2014 offense is to remain effective on third down.

Mettenberger’s veteran savvy and strong throwing arm frequently dug LSU out of third-and-long situations last year, and it didn’t hurt that he had two future NFL wideouts in Landry and Beckham and a future NFL tailback in Hill at his disposal.

This season’s offense will be extremely young at the skill positions, so Cameron emphasized that whoever wins the quarterback job must keep the offense in manageable situations in order to move the chains.

“I thought we converted pretty well on third down [in the spring game] and now they’ve got to understand how you set yourself up for a manageable third down by the decisions you make on first and second down,” Cameron said. “And right now, we’re not where we need to be.

“We’ve got to know on first down and second down, let’s put ourselves in the best third-down position possible. Last year we converted on third-and-22, third-and-15, third-and-18, third-and-10 consistently. You don’t do that every year, and I think they’re starting to figure that out.”

Five LSU spring movers

April, 21, 2014
Apr 21
9:00
AM ET
Sometimes spring practice is important to a football player not because he seizes a starting job, but because he proves to his coaches that he deserves to play.

We’ve discussed plenty of LSU’s key spring position battles here in the last few weeks and speculated about who might become the starters at those spots. But what about some younger players who haven’t played much or at all? There are several who made an impression during the Tigers’ spring practice and, even if they don’t become starters, we should see them make an impact in the near future.

Here are five of those spring movers:

Maquedius Bain: Christian LaCouture and Quentin Thomas mostly handled the first-team snaps at defensive tackle this spring, but Bain was among the youngsters who made it seem likely that the Tigers will utilize a deeper rotation in the middle this fall. Bain, Greg Gilmore and Frank Herron -- all redshirt freshmen -- sat out last season while veterans Anthony Johnson and Ego Ferguson played most of the important snaps. We should hear all three players’ names quite a bit in 2014, particularly Bain, who tied with Herron for most tackles (four) among second-team defensive linemen in the spring game.

[+] EnlargeBrandon Harris
Derick E. Hingle/USA TODAY SportsLSU freshman quarterback Brandon Harris showed plenty of potential this spring.
Ronnie Feist: LSU has no shortage of talented linebackers, a truth that will become even more evident this summer once Clifton Garrett and the other signees arrive on campus. But Feist -- who did not play last season after contributing as a true freshman in 2012 -- proved during the spring game that he will not be ignored. In fact, he was one of the stars of the afternoon, leading all tacklers with 14 stops and a couple of big hits. It remains to be seen where he’ll fall on John Chavis’ depth chart, but Feist showed that he belongs to be on there somewhere.

Brandon Harris: The big question entering spring practice was whether Harris could threaten Anthony Jennings for the starting quarterback job. The big question afterward concerns how quickly he will overtake his sophomore competitor. An early enrollee, Harris is understandably raw and mistake-prone. He’s extremely talented, however, blessed with an outstanding arm and impressive quickness. Harris will become LSU’s starting quarterback and, based on what we saw from Harris and Jennings this spring, it might happen sooner rather than later.

Melvin Jones: Is he going to play tailback at LSU? No. But a shortage of scholarship tailbacks this spring gave Jones a chance to learn a bit more about how to function in the running game. The sophomore switched from linebacker to fullback last season and even caught a touchdown pass against Furman. He has yet to record a carry in a game yet, however, so the opportunity to carry the ball some during the spring will be helpful when he splits time with senior Connor Neighbors at fullback this fall. Jones led the backup offense with 38 rushing yards on 12 carries in the spring game.

DeSean Smith: After catching just one pass last season (for 14 yards against UAB), Smith seems primed to play a much larger role in 2014. The sophomore tight end possesses valuable pass-catching skills and is nimble enough to split out wide as a receiver. If he proves himself as a capable blocker, Smith’s three catches for 45 yards in the spring game -- including a 19-yard touchdown catch from Harris -- should be only the tip of the iceberg in terms of his offensive production.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- You know what early enrollees typically do when they play in their first spring game? They stink up the joint -- and understandably so.

By all rights, they should still be in high school, making prom plans or figuring out where to go for spring break. They’ve had only a couple of months to digest a complex college playbook, and they’re competing against more seasoned, more physically mature athletes.

[+] EnlargeBrandon Harris
Courtesy of IntersportEarly enrollees aren't supposed to make an impact in spring ball, but QB Brandon Harris did just that in the spring game.
But not only did Brandon Harris not stink up the joint in LSU’s spring game on Saturday, he was arguably the star of the show with three touchdown passes and 195 passing yards. He also flashed impressive escapability when the pocket collapsed, rushing six times for 76 yards and another score.

It was an eye-opening performance, but let’s pump our breaks before declaring the Tigers’ quarterback race over -- even if Anthony Jennings followed an underwhelming performance in the Outback Bowl by going 9-for-17 for 157 yards and tossing interceptions that linebackers Deion Jones and Kwon Alexander returned for touchdowns.

Let’s be clear: if LSU had been playing Alabama -- which seems to be the measuring stick for anything around this program these days -- the performances by either Jennings or Harris would have probably led to an LSU loss.

“There needs to be improvement at the position for both guys,” LSU coach Les Miles confirmed afterward.

Obviously the pair of pick-sixes determined the day’s narrative for Jennings, but Harris had plenty of misfires himself. He displayed a phenomenal skillset and made some remarkable plays, without question, but he simply must reduce the mistakes before he can fulfill his obviously sky-high potential.

Case in point: in the second quarter, Harris overthrew a wide-open DeSean Smith -- wide open as in there was nobody within 10 yards of the big tight end -- and then floated an ugly throw over fullback Connor Neighbors' head on his next pass attempt. Later, he made a debatable decision to throw into double coverage in the end zone, with the pass luckily falling incomplete.

“I really think he made, I don’t know, four, five, six major errors in the scrimmage and yet had the ability to get beyond it, which always is a tremendous mark,” Miles said of Harris, whom LSU has not made available to speak to the media. “And if we can eliminate the mistakes and really play to the advantages, that’s what we’re looking to do.”

If there was anything positive that Jennings could take away from the day, it’s that he at least finished with a flourish. In the first two quarters, Jennings presided over seven drives -- the longest of which covered 31 yards -- with those seven possessions ending in five punts and the two interception returns for touchdowns.

He wrapped up his day with an efficient 73-yard touchdown drive in the third quarter, concluding the possession with a 13-yard scoring pass to Travin Dural.

“If you throw an interception and you don’t come right back, you’re not a good quarterback,” Jennings said afterward. “So every quarterback goes through adversity. It’s how you respond, it’s not how you fall.”

He seemed to take a nasty fall on Saturday, but Jennings now has plenty of time to respond. The good news for the Tigers is that they don’t play Alabama for seven months. In fact, they don’t play anybody until the Aug. 30 kickoff against Wisconsin. That’s nearly five months for both quarterbacks to keep developing a rapport with their receiving corps and battling for the right to take the first snap against the Badgers.

Asked about the message he will send the quarterbacks going into summer workouts, Miles’ message was simple: “Compete. That’s it.” This after saying in his press conference that the coaches plan to “let the competition continue and see how this thing plays out” this summer.

Competition was also the theme of this spring, and it was apparently a productive period for both players, of whom Miles reiterated after Saturday’s game that “I think both guys are talented enough to be our quarterback.”

The talent was apparent, particularly when Harris was throwing darts and sprinting away from defenders for big gains. But will LSU’s coaches be able to harness that talent quickly enough to beat opponents like Wisconsin, Auburn, Florida, Mississippi State and, of course, the mighty Crimson Tide?

That is going to be the deciding factor in LSU’s 2014 season. With what should be an improved defense and with Leonard Fournette, Terrence Magee and Kenny Hilliard in the backfield, the Tigers should be able to pound most of their opponents into submission. But against the nastiest teams on the schedule, they need to be able to at least make opposing defenses respect the pass -- and not make any catastrophic errors when they do choose to put the ball in the air.

Both quarterbacks made some potentially catastrophic throws on Saturday, and that’s OK for now. Jennings and Harris need to make great strides in this summer’s passing sessions, however, or it will be 2015 at the earliest before the Tigers again rank among the top contenders for a national championship.

LSU SPRING AWARDS
Here is the full list of spring practice awards that LSU coach Les Miles presented after Saturday’s spring game:

Jimmy Taylor Award (Comprehensive spring award for outstanding leadership, effort and performance): D.J. Welter

Ralph Norwood Performance Award (Outstanding performance in spring drills, offense): Kenny Hilliard, La'el Collins, Elliott Porter, Jerald Hawkins

Toby Caston Performance Award (Outstanding performance in spring drills, defense): Deion Jones, Tre'Davious White, Rashard Robinson, Danielle Hunter, D.J. Welter, Kwon Alexander

Eric Andolsek Leadership Award (Outstanding leadership in spring drills, offense): La'el Collins, Connor Neighbors, Kenny Hilliard, Terrence Magee, Jerald Hawkins

Mike Miley Leadership Award (Outstanding leadership in spring drills, defense): Danielle Hunter, Christian LaCouture, D.J. Welter, Jalen Mills, Ronald Martin

Alvin Roy Fourth Quarter Award (Outstanding performance in LSU offseason program): Danielle Hunter, Duke Riley, K.J. Malone, Ethan Pocic, Travin Dural, Christian LaCouture, Lewis Neal, Tre'Davious White, Tre' Sullivan, Terrence Magee, Luke Boyd, Jeff Lang

Most Improved Award: Ronald Martin, Lewis Neal, Quentin Thomas, Dillon Gordon, Dwayne Thomas, Fehoko Fanaika, K.J. Malone, DeSean Smith, Anthony Jennings, Tashawn Bower

Jerry Stovall Special Teams Award: Colby Delahoussaye, Reid Ferguson, Tre'Davious White

Newcomer Award: Brandon Harris, Ed Paris

Overcoming Adversity Award: Dwayne Thomas, Quantavius Leslie, Lamar Louis

Coaches Award: Devante Meullion, John David Moore, Chris LaBorde, Tommy LeBeau, Tre' Sullivan, Brad Kragthorpe, Alex Cheramie
BATON ROUGE, La. – This was a spring of transition for LSU offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, with inexperienced players sliding into leading roles at most of the skill-position spots.

That might cause the Tigers to utilize some positions -- like tight end -- differently than they did a season ago, as LSU will certainly carry more question marks into preseason practice than it did last year with a senior quarterback and veteran stars at tailback and receiver.

[+] EnlargeCam Cameron
Derick E. Hingle/USA TODAY SportsLSU's Cam Cameron isn't quite ready to name a starting quarterback.
Cameron discussed that possibility and a variety of other subjects with reporters after Saturday’s spring game. Here is some of what he had to say:

Q: How important will it be that you work the ball to the fullbacks and tight ends in the passing game this season?

A: It’s critical. We want every guy on our offense involved in both phases of our game, run and pass. And at any point in time, if a defense knows you’re not going to throw the ball to a guy, then I think you make it tough on yourself. But Connor Neighbors is as good a receiving fullback as I’ve been around. Melvin Jones is going to be outstanding. All our tight ends, I just mentioned all of them, even J.D. Moore came in and made a big play at the end, so we’ve got great depth at tight end, we’ve got two really outstanding fullbacks and we’re going to need them this season.

Q: How much did you have to tinker with the scheme to work the ball to the tight ends?

A: Our system is what it is. It’s a route tree that allows tight ends to do what they do best. We didn’t feature it last year for obvious reasons, knowing the talent at outside, and then we would move Jarvis [Landry] and Odell [Beckham] down inside almost in a tight end-type role. But this year is different. Every year with different personnel creates a whole new set of opportunities and I think the opportunities for our tight ends are going to be critical. I was thrilled -- for the most part I thought they made the most of it.

Q: How much will the group of signees arriving this summer cause you to re-evaluate how you use the different positions?

A: You’re always evaluating. But I think everyone knows this: we bring young players here to play. It’s Les [Miles'] philosophy. No one plays more young players than we do to my knowledge. But the key thing is, they know, we expect them to come in and play a major role. Not just play. Not just letter. They need to take a major role and make big plays in big games and this is a freshman class that I know our current players are looking forward to playing with. And at the same time, it’s a group that’s looking forward to coming in here and playing big roles in big games.

Q: How did Rob Bolden make the transition from quarterback to receiver this spring?

A: Rob is 6-5, he looks the part. He’s spatially starting to get a feel for how to play out in space. Was really pleased. First thing he said to me coming through the tunnel was, ‘Gosh, I should have made a couple of those plays,’ and we know that. But I think I’m confident he’ll make those plays.

Q: How much of Brandon Harris’ feel for the pocket and his decisions to tuck it and run were natural and how much was by design?

A: You mean total panic, scramble and run? [Laughs] The only reason I’m saying that is we tease Brandon about that. He may not be doing it for reasons you think he is. But again, I think mobility is something that we like in a quarterback. We know what to do, we think, with a quarterback that doesn’t have mobility and I think there’s certain things that you try to allow QBs to do when they have it, and he and Anthony [Jennings] and even Hayden [Rettig] -- you saw Hayden’s an athlete -- all our guys are pretty athletic and mobility’s going to be a big thing for us this season.

Q: How different are those two quarterbacks from where they were when you started at the first of March?

A: That’s a good question. They’re better. They should be better. They’ll continue to get better. I would think that all our quarterbacks, until the day they leave, will be continuing to improve and will be ascending players after they leave here. That would be our goal. So every snap these guys get in practice or in a scrimmage or in a game, if they can stay healthy, they should get better -- especially when you’re 18, 19 years old.

Q: As you get ready to send them into the summer, what’s the message you’re sending them over what to work on?

A: You know, I haven’t thought about that yet. I’m going to kind of look at the tape, think about it [Sunday] and we’ll meet on Monday, we’ll talk to them on Tuesday. And we’ll kind of get with the staff collectively, ‘OK, where are we? What are our strengths right now? What are the areas we need to improve?’ We’ll kind of let this marinate for a night, think about it and kind of come up with something for them by Monday or Tuesday.

SEC lunchtime links

November, 29, 2013
11/29/13
12:00
PM ET
It was a good start to Week 13 with a thriller in the Egg Bowl. There still are plenty of games to be played, including Saturday’s Iron Bowl. Let’s take a look around the SEC:

LSU spring football primer

March, 14, 2013
3/14/13
10:00
AM ET
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Here are things to know as LSU starts spring practice:

Practice dates: March 14, 15, 16, 19, 21, 23 (scrimmage), 25, 26 and 28. After spring break, resumes April 9, 11, 13 (scrimmage), 16, 18 and 20 (spring game).

What's new: Offensive coordinator Cam Cameron will install his new offense, and four new starters will man the defensive line.

What's old: The Tigers have eight returning starters on offense, led by quarterback Zach Mettenberger.

Offensive outlook:
Starters returning (8): QB Mettenberger, RB Jeremy Hill, FB J.C. Copeland, WR Jarvis Landry, WR Odell Beckham, LT La'el Collins (moved from left guard), LG Josh Williford (moved from right guard), RG Trai Turner, RT Vadal Alexander.

New starters: TE Dillon Gordon or Logan Stokes, C Elliott Porter. Key reserves -- QB Stephen Rivers, RBs Alfred Blue, Kenny Hilliard and Terrance Magee, FB Connor Neighbors, LT Jerald Hawkins, RG Fehoko Fanaika, RT Ethan Pocic, WR James Wright, Kadron Boone, John Diarse and Travin Dural, TE Travis Dickson.

(Read full post)

Where LSU will need help: Offense 

January, 4, 2013
1/04/13
10:17
AM ET
BATON ROUGE, La. -- There are some unknown variables when trying to figure out where true freshmen might play a big role on a team.

Avery Johnson
Davide De Pas/ESPN.comClass of 2012 wide receiver Avery Johnson looks to re-enroll after going to prep school for a year. He could contribute to LSU as soon as next season.
Take LSU right tackle Vadal Alexander. The 2012 signee became a true freshman starter at right tackle halfway through the season, something nobody saw coming. But when left tackle Chris Faulk suffered a season-ending knee injury, it opened the door for Alexander to move into the lineup, and he took the job and ran with it after another veteran starting tackle, Alex Hurst, left the team.

Similarly, with a veteran stable of running backs returning, few saw true freshman Jeremy Hill emerging as a primary running back for LSU this year. Yet, it took only one injury -- to original starter Alfred Blue -- to get Hill the break he needed to start getting carries and eventually become the starter and the Tigers' leading rusher.

After decommits, how might LSU proceed? 

December, 4, 2012
12/04/12
8:24
AM ET
BATON ROUGE, La. -- When news came down last week that LSU had lost a pair of commitments from wide receiver Chuck Baker and fullback Kennard Swanson, it wasn't met with the angst from fans that one might think.

It wasn't long before the 4-star receiver and 3-star fullback parted ways that some were wondering how LSU would make room if all the star prospects who are considering LSU and still available -- including the nation's top two athletes in Ricky Seals-Jones and Kendell Beckwith -- want to come.

That doesn't seem to be an issue now.

To continue reading this article you must be an Insider

Miles not ready to shuffle offense

October, 9, 2012
10/09/12
8:33
AM ET
BATON ROUGE, La. -- As its beleaguered offense has looked for answers to injury and ineffective play this season, LSU has found itself shuffling players around.

The Tigers have started three running backs at least one game this season. Because of injury, three players have started at least one game at left tackle and two at right tackle. Alex Hurst has started at both right tackle and left tackle and Josh Dworaczyk has spent time at guard and tackle.

But even with a recent trend to struggle offensively against SEC opponents, including an anemic 200-yard offensive performance in last week's 14-6 loss to Florida, there are two shuffles LSU coach Les Miles isn't considering: his offensive coaching staff and the Tigers' offensive approach.

[+] EnlargeGreg Studrawa
Derick E. Hingle/US PresswireOffensive coordinator Greg Studrawa will continue to call plays from the press box, LSU coach Les Miles said.
Asked if he would consider any changes in game-day responsibility for his offensive staff heading into this week's game against No. 3 South Carolina, Miles said, "We're all doing the things we've been doing for the last number of years and there's no reason to change responsibilities in my mind."

That's not exactly the case. Offensive coordinator Greg Studrawa was promoted from offensive line coach after then-offensive coordinator Steve Kragthorpe was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in August 2011. Kragthorpe is now quarterbacks coach and coaches from the field while Studrawa calls plays in the press box.

Tight ends coach Steve Ensminger is available to deal with the linemen on the sideline during games.

In recent games against SEC opponents, the approach hasn't worked well. While the issues were often masked by a forgiving early schedule in which the Tigers piled up points in wins over North Texas, Idaho and Washington, LSU has managed 18 points and one touchdown in two SEC games this season.

Dating to last season's 21-0 loss to Alabama in last season's BCS championship game, the Tigers have 18 points, one touchdown and 643 yards in their last three games against SEC opponents.

"In our view," Miles said, "we have to run it and throw it better."

And maybe call plays better.

(Read full post)

SPONSORED HEADLINES

False Start For College Football Season?
Danny Kanell and Adam Rittenberg look back on Texas A&M and South Carolina from week 1. Did the first big game of the season point us in the wrong direction?
VIDEO PLAYLIST video