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Monday, December 31, 2012
Countdown to signing day: Greg Gilmore

By Gary Laney

To gear up for 2013 national signing day, GeauxTigerNation's Gary Laney will break down every commitment in the Tigers' 2013 recruiting class.

Vitals: DT Greg Gilmore, Hope Mills, N.C./South View, 6-foot-4, 285 pounds

Committed: Nov. 8, 2012

ESPN Grade: 84, four-star prospect

Picked LSU over: Florida at the end, but he also visited Oklahoma and had offers from the likes of Alabama and USC.

Greg Gilmore
ESPN 150 defensive tackle Greg Gilmore will be among the candidates to fill a huge position of need for LSU on the defensive front.
State of the position: LSU has made a name for itself for sending defensive tackles to the NFL and the Tigers will have a need at the position, thanks in part to what appears to be a continuation of that trend as starter Bennie Logan appears headed out the door at the end of this, his junior season, to go somewhere in the top two rounds of the draft. Given the history of putting players in the pros and the need for players at the position -- the Tigers will also lose senior starter Josh Downs -- it makes perfect sense for the No. 104 player in the country to want to go from North Carolina to Louisiana to play his college football.

Pros: Gimore is a big-bodied player who can carry much more weight than his current 285 pounds, according to ESPN Scouts. A perfect "Three" technique who can play head-up on a guard to clog the middle, Gilmore can develop into a prototypical run-stuffer inside.

Cons: Not a particularly gifted pass rusher, Gilmore has work to do to avoid being one of those tackles who gets taken out of a game when LSU goes to its "Mustang" 3-2-6 package it favors on third-and-longs or against teams that routinely use four or five wides. He comes off the ball well, so the raw ability might be there for him to take that step.

Similar to/potential role: It's hard to pick one player in LSU's recent history Gilmore compares to, but he leans more toward some of the longer tackles like Michael Brockers or Al Woods and perhaps less like the more compact, quickness-oriented tackles like Glenn Dorsey or Drake Nevis. As it was with Brockers and Woods, expect the primary challenge for Gilmore to be consistently coming off the ball with a low pad level.