LSU Tigers: LSU Tigers

Editor's note: We broke down LSU's need to improve at quarterback as part of our SEC blog's positional series two weeks ago. This week on the LSU blog, we continue our position-by-position look at the 2015 Tigers.

Perhaps no position group at LSU progressed more over the course of the 2014 season than the defensive line.

That group was a problem early in the season when opponents like Mississippi State and Auburn rolled up two of the biggest yardage totals ever accumulated against the Tigers in the Les Miles era. But by the time the season ended, the line was a strength.

[+] EnlargeDanielle Hunter
AP Photo/Brynn AndersonLSU will be looking to replace solid defensive ends Jermauria Rasco and Danielle Hunter.
"We mainly had to focus on our run this year more than anything because most teams were just trying to run all over us," defensive end Danielle Hunter said.

The biggest question facing the group in 2015 will be whether the Tigers' front can do a better job pressuring the quarterback, particularly without Hunter and Jermauria Rasco. The Tigers did not record many sacks -- they had just 19, second-to-last in the SEC -- even with those two ends, but now it might fall on younger players like Tashawn Bower, Sione Teuhema and Deondre Clark to make quarterbacks sweat.

"It would be great to get all the sacks, but we definitely got a lot of QB pressures and a lot of quarterback hits and things of that nature," Bower said. "So we're definitely happy with where we're at, but we're not content."

New position coach Ed Orgeron also has work to do in developing depth. Predecessor Brick Haley got a lot out of interior linemen Christian LaCouture and Davon Godchaux, but the Tigers have a number of heavily recruited tackles who struggled to make much of a difference.

Entering their redshirt sophomore seasons, tackles Maquedius Bain, Frank Herron and Greg Gilmore could help Orgeron build better depth, as could redshirt freshmen Travonte Valentine and Trey Lealaimatafao.

The two redshirt freshmen might be able to make an immediate impact, in fact.

"Trey Valentine, he's a true run-stopper," Rasco said. "He's got some juice in him in the pass rush. You'll see him in a game and you won't be expecting him to be able to move as good as he moves. And also with Trey Lay, for a guy to be so little, he's real powerful and he brings a lot to the table. Those are going to be the secret weapons for next year as long as they do what they have to do on and off the field."

It will be a huge benefit that LaCouture and Godchaux both return after locking down starting jobs last fall. That should help LSU's front seven remain strong against the run while Orgeron nails down the ends he can rely on to generate a better pass rush.

Some of those players might not even be on the roster yet. LSU continues to pursue several top-tier end prospects, some of whom would be capable of providing an immediate lift should they sign with the Tigers on Feb. 4.

"Those guys, I don't see no letdown," Rasco said during bowl practice. "The only thing that'll happen, I don't know who they're bringing in, but they'd better get with the program early if they want to play. That's the only thing I can say."

BREAKDOWN

Returning players: DT Davon Godchaux (42 tackles, 1.5 TFL), DT Christian LaCouture (40 tackles, 4 TFL, 2.5 sacks), DE Tashawn Bower (16 tackles, 2.5 TFL), DT Quentin Thomas (9 tackles, 0.5 TFL), DE Deondre Clark (9 tackles, 0.5 TFL), DE Sione Teuhema (7 tackles, 2 TFL, 2 sacks), DT Maquedius Bain (6 tackles), DT Greg Gilmore (4 tackles, 0.5 TFL, 0.5 sacks), DE Lewis Neal (3 tackles, 1.5 TFL), DT Mickey Johnson (3 tackles), DT Frank Herron (3 tackles), DE M.J. Patterson (1 tackle), DT Trey Lealaimatafao (redshirted), DT Travonte Valentine (redshirted).

Departed players: DE Danielle Hunter (73 tackles, 13 TFL, 1.5 sacks), DE Jermauria Rasco (71 tackles, 7.5 TFL, 4 sacks), DE Justin Maclin (3 tackles, 0.5 TFL, 0.5 sacks).

Committed prospects: Isaiah Washington (No. 72 DE, three stars)

Outlook: Orgeron will need to fill holes at defensive end after Rasco and Hunter left -- a position battle that should rank among the most intriguing for LSU in the spring and preseason. The good news is that tackles LaCouture and Godchaux developed into solid starters, which should help the line be more stout against the run than it was early last season. If Orgeron can help the Tigers' front produce more sacks and negative-yardage plays, 2015 should be a solid season for the line.
Editor's note: We broke down LSU's need to improve at quarterback as part of our SEC blog's positional series two weeks ago. This week on the LSU blog, we continue our position-by-position look at the 2015 Tigers.

La'el Collins sat down to review LSU practice film late last season and eventually noticed something familiar. When his backup K.J. Malone got reps at left tackle, he was using many of Collins' blocking techniques.

"He's going to be a great player. He's learned a lot," said Collins, who won the SEC's Jacobs Blocking Trophy as the conference's top blocker in 2014. "I watch film on him in practice and I see some of the stuff on his tape, I can tell that he's been watching my film. I asked him, 'Karl, have you been watching my film? Where'd you get that from?' [And he said], 'Yeah, I watched it.'

[+] EnlargeK.J. Malone
Kim Klement/USA TODAY SportsThe Tigers are looking to young players like K.J. Malone to keep their offensive line strong.
"That makes me feel good to know that I'm able to impact a player. That's all I'm trying to do."

Collins leaves an enormous void at left tackle, but he is confident that LSU's offensive line will remain strong thanks to youngsters like Malone and Andy Dodd. And it doesn't hurt that right tackle Jerald Hawkins and left guard Vadal Alexander decided against entering the NFL draft, giving LSU three returning starters along with center/guard Ethan Pocic.

'Y'all haven't gotten a chance to see the young guys, really, at all, and y'all will be pretty shocked at how athletic and strong and talented the guys are coming up on the offensive line, from Garrett Brumfield to Josh Boutte, K.J. Malone," Alexander said.

Alexander started at right tackle as a freshman before shifting to left guard for 2013 and 2014. After announcing he would return for his senior season, he said he expected to move back to tackle this fall -- although he didn't know which side he or Hawkins might play. He predicted that rising junior Pocic and other young players would fill in the interior spots.

As for Hawkins, he definitely has earning the starting job at left tackle on his mind.

"I definitely see it as my objective," Hawkins said. "Any lineman, when we play as tackles, always wants to play left tackle."

A possibility at one of the interior spots is Dodd at center. Dodd said he spent 95 percent of his time at the position during practice last season and the other 5 percent at guard, although he played only center during games.

Dodd said knowledge of the playbook is one of the most important factors at center – a lesson that his time behind departed starter Elliott Porter reinforced.

"You have to be confident. You've got to know your stuff," Dodd said. "You just have to be able to think during the game. Like whenever something's not exactly how it is in practice, you have to be able to adjust to it. It's not really hard. You just have to focus."

Pocic is capable of playing any position on the line, which will give second-year position coach Jeff Grimes plenty of flexibility. With Boutte, Malone, Brumfield -- ESPN's No. 1 guard prospect in 2014, who redshirted last season -- Jevonte Domond, Will Clapp and Jonah Austin all back, Grimes will also have multiple lineup options.

"It's going to be a lot of room for learning," Malone said. "We're going to be really young because we're losing a lot of veterans, maybe. La'el, he's going to be a great loss to the O-line. But I think learning from all the veterans right now, I think we'll be ready for it."

Entering his third season as a starter, Hawkins agrees with Malone's assessment. He said he has been impressed by the potential he sees from the group of players who will begin fighting to grab starting spots this spring.

"All our young guys -- from Garrett Brumfield to K.J. Malone, William Clapp, especially Andy Dodd -- they're just coming up like they want it," Hawkins said during bowl practice. "I can see it in their eyes like they really want it. They want to play, and you can tell in practice. They're going after it each and every day."

BREAKDOWN

Returning players: Starters: LG Vadal Alexander, RT Jerald Hawkins, C/RG Ethan Pocic. Reserves: OG Jonah Austin, OG Garrett Brumfield, OL Josh Boutte, C/OG Andy Dodd, OT K.J. Malone, OL Will Clapp, OT Jevonte Domond.

Departed players: Starters: LT La'el Collins, C Elliott Porter. Reserves: RG Fehoko Fanaika, OL Evan Washington.

Committed prospects: Maea Teuhema (No. 2 OG, No. 71 overall on ESPN 300, four stars), Adrian Magee (No. 41 OT, four stars), George Brown Jr. (No. 67 OT, three stars).

Outlook: LSU got welcome news in mid-January when Alexander and Hawkins announced they would return next fall, giving the Tigers three returning starters. No doubt, it hurts losing star left tackle Collins, but the Tigers have some promising youngsters waiting for their shot. It will be interesting to see where Pocic lands during spring practice -- either guard or center, most likely -- and which players get the first shot at the other two starting jobs on the interior line, assuming Alexander and Hawkins occupy the tackle spots. The ground should remain a strength for LSU in 2015.

LSU position breakdown: Tight end

January, 28, 2015
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Editor's note: We broke down LSU's need to improve at quarterback as part of our SEC blog's positional series two weeks ago. This week on the LSU blog, we continue our position-by-position look at the 2015 Tigers.

Although he won't be around to make a difference in the fall, Logan Stokes sees great potential from his former position mates at LSU.

Tight end was one of the deepest positions on the team last season, and even without Stokes and fellow 2014 senior Travis Dickson, it should remain a valuable group this season.

"I expect nothing but the absolute best from those guys," said Stokes, whose lone reception at LSU went for the game-winning touchdown last season against Ole Miss.

Stokes' specialty was blocking, but the Tigers have several tight ends with receiving skills. The question is whether they will actually get many balls thrown their way. LSU tight ends accounted for just 12 receptions last season, including seven by Dickson and one by Stokes. DeSean Smith accounted for the other four (for 66 yards), all of which came in a bowl loss against Notre Dame.

Perhaps that's a sign that Smith will play a bigger role as a receiver this fall, or that tight ends Dillon Gordon, Colin Jeter or redshirt freshman Jacory Washington might also get some looks.

"[Smith is] just going to continue to grow and get better and I think that he could definitely be one of the best tight ends in college football next year," Stokes said. "Jacory could be one of those guys, too, him or Jeter. All three of those guys bring something special to the table."

Gordon is the veteran of the bunch after starting 25 games in the last two seasons, but he is predominantly a dominant blocker.

"We can put him over there by one of those tackles and there's a bang on that side," LSU coach Les Miles said.

If the tight ends account for more passing production, it will probably come from Smith, Washington and Jeter.

Rising junior Smith might be the frontrunner to get the most looks, but Washington will also be an intriguing player to watch in the spring and preseason. He redshirted last fall because of the Tigers' considerable depth at the position, but his athleticism will make him an asset moving forward.

"I think Jacory's going to be a monster one day," Stokes said. "He's big, tall, strong. Just coming here, they wanted him to put some size on and get used to the system and we had a lot of older guys in front of him, so they redshirted him. But it's definitely benefited him a lot. He looks a lot more comfortable out there at practice, especially blocking. I don't think he had ever blocked before he got here and he's actually going to be a very good blocker."

The Tigers already have commitments from two tight ends for this recruiting class -- one of whom, blocking specialist Hanner Shipley, has already enrolled.

But the Tigers will again be led by veterans at tight end, and they will benefit from the versatility that exists within the bunch.

"They all kind of have what the other one doesn't have, I guess you could say," Stokes said. "They're going to work out perfect next year."

BREAKDOWN

Returning players: Dillon Gordon (no catches in 2014), Colin Jeter (no catches), DeSean Smith (4-66), Jacory Washington (redshirted).

Departed players: Travis Dickson (7-60), Logan Stokes (1-3, TD).

Committed prospects: Bry'Kiethon Mouton (No. 6 TE-H, four stars), Hanner Shipley (No. 120 DE, three stars).

Outlook: Will this be the year where LSU makes greater use of the tight end in the passing game? The Tigers finally looked to the position a bit in the bowl loss to Notre Dame, but their tight ends mostly served as blockers in 2014. There is a good mixture of skillsets in the group, with Gordon easily the top returning blocker and youngsters Smith and Washington as candidates to contribute as receivers.
Editor's note: We broke down LSU's need to improve at quarterback as part of our SEC blog's positional series two weeks ago. This week on the LSU blog, we continue our position-by-position look at the 2015 Tigers.

LSU's growing pains at quarterback made for the biggest storyline in the Tigers' 2014 season, causing similar issues at wide receiver to fly under the radar somewhat.

But if the Tigers are to improve upon their underwhelming passing numbers, it will take more than development from Anthony Jennings or Brandon Harris under center. The young receiving corps will have to make big strides as well.

[+] EnlargeLSU's Travin Dural
Photo by Bob Levey/Getty ImagesTravin Dural delivered for LSU's passing game in 2014, but he'll need help from fellow receivers next season.
"I see a lot of guys who can help us produce next year," said Travin Dural, the Tigers' only consistent weapon in the passing game last fall. "We're going to be a little deep receiving corps next year and we're going to be more mature than we were this year. Everyone's going to have that game experience, so we can't really say no one knows what it feels like to play in this game or play in that game. That's going to be something we've done before and we're going to know how to handle these situations."

Perhaps that was the biggest issue for the Tigers from a receiving standpoint. Star freshman signees Malachi Dupre and Trey Quinn were playing big roles in their first SEC season. Same for redshirt freshman John Diarse, who was in line to play in 2013 before a season-ending injury.

Even Dural was playing a much bigger role, taking over as the Tigers' go-to target once Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry jumped to the NFL after standout junior seasons in 2013. But Dural largely delivered, leading the team with 37 catches for 758 yards and seven touchdowns.

Considering that the Tigers passed for just 2,118 yards all season, Dural needs assistance from his fellow receivers -- and stronger play from his quarterback -- if the passing game is to improve in 2015.

The good news is that Jennings said he witnessed signs of growth throughout the season from some of the others.

"John Diarse is getting better, Trey Quinn is getting better," Jennings said. "All those guys that we're going to need in the offense are getting better each and every day. I think those guys are going to be a force to be reckoned with."

Same for Dupre, ESPN's No. 1 wideout prospect in 2014, who was second on the team with 318 receiving yards and five touchdowns. He will be a key figure if the Tigers' passing production increases, as his 6-foot-3 frame makes Dupre a potential target for downfield throws and jump balls at the goal line.

However, fans should also keep an eye on another 2014 freshman, Dural said. D.J. Chark did not record a reception in six games, but Dural said he was impressive in practice and could be next in line to claim a bigger role in the position rotation.

"He's a guy who can help us stretch the defense out because he's a guy who runs 4.4., 4.3. He runs real fast and is long and athletic and can really jump," Dural said. "So coming into spring, if he has a good spring, he can be a guy who can really help us out next year."

The Tigers could use the help. If Jennings or Harris don't get it together between now and September, the receivers' improvement might not matter much. But assuming the Tigers put the ball in the air more than they did last fall -- and they almost certainly will after only 11 FBS programs averaged fewer passing yards per game than LSU in 2014 -- those still-developing quarterbacks need a more consistent effort from their receivers this fall.

After learning on the job last season, the group could be in for a season of major growth.

BREAKDOWN

Returning players: Travin Dural (37 catches, 758 yards, 7 TDs), Trey Quinn (17-193), John Diarse (15-275, 3 TDs), Malachi Dupre (14-318, 5 TDs), D.J. Chark (no catches), Avery Peterson (no catches), Kevin Spears (no catches), Tony Upchurch (redshirted).

Departed players: Quantavius Leslie (no catches).

Committed prospects: Tyron Johnson (No. 3 WR, No. 30 overall on ESPN 300, four stars), Jazz Ferguson (No. 52 WR, four stars). ESPN lists verbal commit Lanard Fournette as a running back (No. 100 RB, three stars), but he could play receiver in college.

Outlook: The Tigers return every significant contributor from a year ago, plus they will add Johnson, who has the ability to play immediately. Dural is the veteran of the bunch after a breakthrough redshirt sophomore season, but Diarse, Dupre and Quinn all got valuable experience as freshmen in 2014. It will be interesting during spring practice to see whether any of the youngsters who didn't play much last fall will begin to make a move.

LSU position breakdown: Running back

January, 26, 2015
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Editor’s note: We broke down LSU’s need to improve at quarterback as part of our SEC blog’s positional series two weeks ago. This week on the LSU blog, we continue our position-by-position look at the 2015 Tigers.

Leonard Fournette did not live up to preseason Heisman Trophy buzz last fall, but he still set LSU’s freshman rushing record with 1,034 yards. Now, with seniors Terrence Magee and Kenny Hilliard working to earn NFL roster spots, Fournette is in position to become the Tigers’ feature back as a sophomore.

“I talked to Leonard and his mindset is very strong right now,” offensive lineman Vadal Alexander said on Jan. 16 after announcing his decision to return for his senior season. “He’s ready to go back to work. I talked to him actually today walking from class and he’s ready to go. We’re ready to make this offense explosive. Along with him and the whole offense, we’re ready to do big things.”

During his freshman season, Fournette displayed glimpses of the potential that made him ESPN’s top overall prospect in the 2014 recruiting class. His 264 all-purpose yards (including 143 rushing yards and a 100-yard kickoff return touchdown) in a bowl loss to Notre Dame made for one of the most dynamic performances in LSU postseason history, and his power running was the driving force in key SEC wins against Florida and Texas A&M.

If he and fellow sophomore Darrel Williams take a step forward like their former teammates expect, LSU’s running game should remain in good shape.

[+] EnlargeLeonard Fournette
Scott Halleran/Getty ImagesLeonard Fournette will shoulder even more of the load for LSU in 2015 after an outstanding freshman season.
“I expect a lot out of those boys, especially with Leonard and Darrel,” ex-Tigers fullback Connor Neighbors said. “They probably could be the two best backs we’ve ever had. Leonard’s shown flashes of what he can do, and so has Darrel in some cases.

“But I know once Kenny and Terrence leave, Darrel’s role is going to expand. He’s a hell of a back just like Leonard is. He just has to wait his turn. It’s hard when your classmate is the same age and gets a little more playing time. I know how that feels. But once he steps up, it’s going to be great.”

Williams was the less-heralded prospect out of LSU’s 2014 running back signees but became a valuable reserve, particularly in short-yardage situations. Magee agreed with Neighbors’ assessment that Williams’ role should expand, partially because of LSU’s traditional philosophy of spreading around the carries and partially because of Williams’ ability to avoid fumbling.

“It’s always running back by committee here,” Magee said. “Since he’s been here, the biggest thing that I’ve seen about him, he does a great job of taking care of the ball. Since he’s been here, I can only remember him fumbling the ball twice. That plays a big part in playing running back -- you’ve got to take care of the ball. He does a great job in pass protection, so I think he’s going to find his way on the field very easily next year on third downs as well as first and second down.”

The biggest question surrounding the group will be depth. Neighbors and Melvin Jones are out of the picture, leaving John David Moore as the Tigers’ only player with game experience at fullback. And with Magee and Hilliard completing their eligibility, Fournette and Williams will be entrusted with helping verbal commits Derrius Guice and Nick Brossette get ready to play as freshmen.

“I know they’re going to bring in two great young freshmen and hopefully they can learn from Darrel and Leonard and be able to contribute to the team next year,” Magee said.

It helps that David Ducre, who can play fullback and tailback, is already on campus as an early enrollee. Perhaps he wasn’t as high-profile a prospect as LSU’s tailback commits, but LSU believes it got a steal in Ducre, whose versatility could make him an immediate weapon.

The most important figure will be Fournette, though. He should be the centerpiece of LSU’s offense in 2015, and based on his performances when LSU continuously fed him the ball in 2014, that should be a good thing for the Tigers.

BREAKDOWN

Returning players: TB: Leonard Fournette (187 carries, 1,034 yards, 10 TDs; 7 receptions, 127 yards; 1,786 all-purpose yards), Darrel Williams (64-302, 3 TDs; 6-63 receiving). FB: John David Moore (No carries).

Departed players: TB: Terrence Magee (112-571, 3 TDs; 17-171 receiving), Kenny Hilliard (90-447, 6 TDs; 4-35 receiving). FB: Connor Neighbors (No carries, 4-27 receiving), Melvin Jones (4-12; 5-22 receiving, TD).

Committed prospects: TB: Derrius Guice (No. 8 RB, No. 96 overall on ESPN 300, four stars), Nick Brossette (No. 12 RB, No. 121 overall, four stars). FB: David Ducre (No. 35 RB, four stars, early enrollee). ESPN lists Fournette's younger brother Lanard, who committed to LSU over the weekend, as a running back (No. 100 at the position, three stars), but it's possible that he will play receiver in college.

Outlook: This will be a young bunch with seniors Magee, Hilliard and Neighbors completing their eligibility. Fournette’s presence obviously solidifies the position, but the Tigers will enter the season with very little experience at fullback and only Fournette and Williams with on-field work at tailback. Ducre will get a leg up by participating in spring practice and tailback commits Guice and Brossette should have a chance to contribute as freshmen should they sign with the Tigers next month.

LSU freshman tracker: Week 14

November, 30, 2014
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LSU wrapped up an 8-4 regular season by edging Texas A&M on Thursday -- with freshman running back Leonard Fournette leading the way.

Here is how Fournette and LSU’s other true freshmen fared in the 23-17 victory over the Aggies:

S Jamal Adams

What he did: Adams started for the second time in the past three games and tied for the team lead with eight tackles, plus he made a tackle for loss.

What it means: The freshman safety was all over the place against the Aggies, including on an impressive third-down stop to force a punt in the second quarter. Adams is one of the most exciting young defensive players on LSU’s roster. He’ll be an All-SEC candidate next season once he enters the starting lineup full-time.

WR Malachi Dupre

What he did: Dupre made one catch for a 41-yard gain deep into Texas A&M territory in the fourth quarter on Thursday.

What it means: Dupre hasn’t made many catches lately (three receptions for 28 yards in the previous five games), but he’s made a couple of them count. He made highlight reels with a one-handed touchdown catch against Alabama, and his catch against A&M extended a late drive while the Tigers were trying to hold onto the lead.

RB Leonard Fournette

What he did: Starting for the fifth time in the past six games, Fournette posted a new career high with 146 rushing yards on 19 carries. He also returned two kickoffs for a total of 34 yards.

What it means: This was Fournette’s fourth game with at least 100 rushing yards, and he produced one of the SEC’s most memorable runs of the season by plowing over A&M safety Howard Matthews on a 22-yard touchdown in the second quarter. Fournette hasn’t lived up to preseason Heisman hype, but he has been LSU’s best running back with 891 rushing yards and eight touchdowns.

DT Davon Godchaux

What he did: Godchaux started for the eighth consecutive game at defensive tackle and finished with one tackle.

What it means: Clearly Godchaux is one of LSU’s top options in the middle, as he has become a fixture in the starting lineup. Perhaps some of the Tigers’ redshirt freshmen will create more of a rotation at tackle next season, but Godchaux and Christian LaCouture appear to have the top spots locked down. Thanks to their improved play, the position is no longer the liability that it was early in the season.

S Devin Voorhies

What he did: Working on LSU’s kickoff coverage unit, Voorhies stripped A&M return man Speedy Noil on a kickoff just before halftime, with LSU’s Duke Riley recovering at the Aggies’ 19-yard line. It was the little-used Voorhies’ first career forced fumble.

What it means: It would not be a surprise to see Voorhies play more on scrimmage downs next season after contributing almost exclusively on special teams this fall. He appeared in seven games and made two tackles this season. To date, Thursday’s forced fumble, which led to a field goal and a 17-7 halftime lead, was easily his biggest play as a Tiger.

LSU freshman tracker: Week 12

November, 16, 2014
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Nobody on LSU's roster put up huge totals in Saturday's 17-0 loss to Arkansas, but here is a recap of the night for five of the Tigers' true freshmen:

S Jamal Adams

What he did: Adams totaled four tackles on Saturday against Arkansas.

What it means: A week after making his first start, Adams came off the bench against Arkansas. He still played plenty and should be in line for extensive playing time in the finale against Texas A&M.

WR Malachi Dupre

What he did: Dupre caught one pass for 6 yards against Arkansas.

What it means: Only two Tigers (Travin Dural and Terrence Magee) caught more than once pass, so that's not a big deal as it relates to Dupre. It's not a particularly positive sign about the Tigers' passing game, however.

RB Leonard Fournette

What he did: Fournette started at tailback and ran five times for 9 yards against Arkansas. He did not catch a pass or return a kickoff.

What it means: LSU coach Les Miles said after the game that Fournette was not injured, but that the plays they might have called for the star freshman tailback were not working. The Tigers struggled with their typical play-calling patterns since starting offensive linemen Vadal Alexander and Elliott Porter were out for all or most of the game.

DT Davon Godchaux

What he did: Godchaux started for the seventh straight game at defensive tackle and registered five tackles and two quarterback hurries.

What it means: Godchaux and LSU's defense were fine against the Razorbacks. Arkansas ran 38 times for just 95 yards (2.5 yards per carry) and totaled just 264 yards of total offense. It was an OK performance by the Tigers' defense, but the offense was so anemic that it wasn't nearly enough to win the game.

RB Darrel Williams

What he did: Williams ran six times for 16 yards on Saturday. He also returned a kickoff for a 21-yard gain.

What it means: With senior Kenny Hilliard out of the lineup, Williams played a more active role in the offense. It didn't matter much since the Tigers were unable to generate much on the ground -- Williams' 16 rushing yards were second on the team behind Magee's 24 -- but Williams will probably play an active role against Texas A&M if Hilliard remains out.

Four storylines for LSU-Arkansas

November, 14, 2014
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BATON ROUGE, La. – Could this be the week that Arkansas ends its 17-game losing streak in SEC play? The oddsmakers in Las Vegas seem to think so, setting the Razorbacks (4-5, 0-5 SEC) as a narrow favorite to beat No. 17 LSU (7-3, 3-3) on Saturday night.

Here are four key storylines to watch as kickoff approaches:

Snow Tigers: The weather could become a major storyline in this game, and it will be interesting to see whether it impacts the style of play in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

As of Thursday afternoon, the weather forecast for Saturday’s game called for temperatures in the 20s at kickoff along with a 10 percent chance of snow.

If that prediction comes through, it would be the coldest game in Les Miles’ tenure as the Tigers’ coach. To date, the coldest temperature at kickoff since Miles arrived at LSU in 2005 was 43 degrees for a 2005 game at Ole Miss. The Tigers have played just three games under Miles in which the temperature was 50 degrees or cooler at kickoff (the others were 47 degrees for a 2012 game at Arkansas and 50 degrees for a 2008 home game against Troy).

It could also be the coldest LSU game from at least the last 40 years. According to LSU’s online archive of box scores, the coldest temperature at kickoff since 1974 was 31 degrees for the 1992 LSU-Arkansas game in Fayetteville. The Tigers played 28 games in that timespan when the temperature was 50 degrees or cooler at kickoff and just seven when it was 40 or cooler.



Run and run some more: If it does snow, it wouldn’t be much of a surprise to see two run-heavy teams rely even more heavily on the ground game.

ESPN Stats & Information reports that LSU has run the ball an SEC-high 67 percent of the time this season, and its rushing success seems to have a correlation to its wins and losses. The Tigers are 5-0 when they rush for at least 200 yards and 2-3 when they do not.

Likewise, Arkansas has run for more than 200 yards in all four of its wins, but it has broken the 200-yard mark just once in its five losses (in an overtime loss to Texas A&M).

So if Arkansas’ backfield duo of Jonathan Williams (137 carries, 877 yards, 10 TDs) and Alex Collins (134-840, 10 TDs) enjoys more success moving the ball on the ground than LSU’s Leonard Fournette (152-736, 7 TDs) and Terrence Magee (81-447, 3 TDs), the Razorbacks are likely the favorite to win. LSU senior Kenny Hilliard (87-431, 6 TDs) is questionable to play after injuring his shoulder against Alabama last Saturday.

Loading the box: The worse the weather, the more likely it will be that the two defenses crowd the line of scrimmage to defend the run. That would be nothing new for the three top running backs in this game.

Fournette (67) has the most carries of any SEC back against defenses with eight or more defenders in the box. Williams (59) and Collins (56) are next in line behind the Tigers’ star freshman.

ESPN Stats & Information reports that Fournette is averaging 4.1 yards per carry against defenses with eight or more men in the box and 5.4 yards per carry against seven or fewer defenders.

LSU defense trending upward: It didn’t seem like it at the time, but the Tigers’ 41-7 loss to Auburn was a turning point in their season – particularly for their run defense.

In LSU’s first three games against Power 5 opponents (Wisconsin, Mississippi State and Auburn), the Tigers surrendered 289.3 rushing yards per game. In the last four games (Florida, Kentucky, Ole Miss and Alabama), LSU gave up 109.3 rushing yards per game.

They have done an excellent job of shutting down drives in a hurry, too. Overall, LSU has forced 46 three-and-outs this season, which is tied for third in the FBS. Of those 46 three-and-outs, 18 came in the last four games – seven of which were by Alabama last week.

Defensive end Danielle Hunter (24 tackles, 5.5 tackles for loss) was a key figure in that four-game stretch, as were weakside linebacker Kwon Alexander (31 tackles, 5 TFLs), middle linebacker Kendell Beckwith (30 tackles, 2 TFLs) and defensive end Jermauria Rasco (28 tackles, 2 TFLs).

In the last three games, LSU’s defense has allowed just two touchdowns in regulation: passes by Ole Miss and Alabama. The Tigers haven’t surrendered a rushing touchdown since the first quarter of the Florida game on Oct. 11.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Logan Stokes know how it looks. But the LSU tight end insists that he didn't intentionally pull down Alabama linebacker Reggie Ragland's uniform pants after a play last Saturday.

"I'm actually a great prankster, so if I was going to pants him, it would have been a lot better job than that," Stokes said after Monday's practice. "Everybody saw the top half of his butt for two seconds and you would have thought I just pulled the biggest prank ever out there. It was not the case, it was not intentional and my apologies to him and all the Alabama fans that have just contacted me and just let me know how they feel."

Stokes said he frequently pulls players off the pile by the back of their pants. In this case, however, Ragland was not wearing a belt and that led to a wardrobe malfunction when Stokes gave his pants a strong tug after an Anthony Jennings run in the third quarter.

"If you watch the Florida game or the Kentucky game, there was a pile and I grabbed people the exact same way, but they were actually wearing a belt, so when I pulled them off, I just yanked them back," Stokes said. "He wasn't wearing a belt, so when I yanked, his pants came down. It wasn't intentional."

The LSU senior, a native Alabamian, said he initially tried to shrug off the response to the play as something funny that happened in the course of a game. But Stokes said the public reaction became a nuisance when it wouldn't die after a day or two -- with even Ragland continuing to have fun with the situation.



Asked if he had heard from many Alabama fans, Stokes responded, "Oh my, have I. I guess I should take my own life after that. Ooh. I get back to the locker room and I can't even open up my cell phone because people are just letting me know exactly what they think.

"Some woman messaged me and told me she's been an Alabama fan for 30 years and she'd never seen anything like that and she thinks I should be suspended for the remainder of the year" Stokes continued. "So if y'all want to take that to the NCAA, I guess I should be suspended and never play again."

That won't happen, but Stokes will probably have to suck it up for a few more days until Saturday's slate of games brings new oddities to distract fans. For now, his revealing Ragland's rear end to the world is the trendy source of viral amusement -- for everyone but Stokes.

"I'm not like real happy about it," he said. "I tried to play it off, but it seems like I take three steps forward and five steps backward."

LSU freshman tracker: Week 11

November, 9, 2014
11/09/14
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Several LSU true freshmen played key roles in the Tigers’ 20-13 overtime loss to Alabama on Saturday.

Here is a recap of their performances against the Crimson Tide:

S Jamal Adams

What he did: With LSU opening in a nickel defense, Adams earned his first career start. He had a relatively quiet night, finishing with two tackles.

What it means: Regardless, Adams is already one of LSU’s most valuable special-teams players and is quickly developing into a defensive star. He was already playing a bigger role on defense prior to cornerback Rashard Robinson’s indefinite suspension, which LSU announced prior to kickoff. If Robinson remains sidelined, that might mean even more playing time for Adams.

WR Malachi Dupre

What he did: Dupre ended a two-game drought without a catch by hauling in a one-handed touchdown catch in the first quarter. The 14-yard grab was Dupre’s only catch of the night, although he was also the intended receiver on Anthony Jennings’ fourth-down incomplete pass in overtime.

What it means: The touchdown catch was one of LSU’s top offensive highlights, but Dupre and fellow freshman Trey Quinn also had some crucial drops on third down. Those missed opportunities came back to bite the Tigers when Alabama rallied to tie and then win in overtime.

RB Leonard Fournette

What he did: Fournette came off the bench for the first time in four games, but still finished as the Tigers’ leading rusher. He ran 21 times for 79 tough yards and also returned a pair of kickoffs for a total of 45 yards.

What it means: Fournette is up to 736 rushing yards for the season, so he should have an opportunity to crack the 1,000-yard mark as a true freshman. He has been the Tigers’ leading rusher in eight of the past nine games and has clearly established himself as the top option in the backfield.

DT Davon Godchaux

What he did: Godchaux started at defensive tackle for the sixth straight game and finished with three tackles and half a tackle for loss.

What it means: He was particularly effective in LSU’s dominant third quarter, when he and Kwon Alexander once combined to stop T.J. Yeldon for a short gain and later when he and Danielle Hunter stopped Yeldon for a 2-yard loss later in the quarter. On the same series, Godchaux pressured Alabama quarterback Blake Sims into an incomplete pass.

RB Darrel Williams
What he did:
With Kenny Hilliard sidelined by a shoulder injury, Williams emerged as a third option out of the backfield during the second half. He ran five times for 14 yards and also caught a pass for an 8-yard gain.

What it means: Williams doesn’t get a ton of touches, but he frequently makes good things happen when the Tigers put the ball in his hands. He spelled Fournette and Terrence Magee nicely in the second half and kept a fourth-quarter drive alive by converting a third-and-short with a 5-yard run.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- A player's career is often defined by performances in the biggest games. There are no bigger games at LSU than the ones against Alabama.

Will Leonard Fournette, Kendell Beckwith or Tre'Davious White become the next Tigers to make their mark in a win against the Crimson Tide? We'll find out when Nick Saban leads his team into Tiger Stadium on Saturay night.

As we approach Les Miles' 11th game against the Tide as the Tigers' coach -- he's 5-5 thus far, although Alabama has won three in a row -- let's review five LSU players from the Miles era who made career-defining plays against Alabama.

WR Dwayne Bowe: Many of the LSU-Alabama games in the Miles era have come down to the final series, and that trend started with his very first game against the Tide in 2005.

No. 3 Alabama had taken a 13-10 lead in overtime when LSU quarterback JaMarcus Russell hit Bowe with the game-winning, 11-yard touchdown pass to hand the Tide its first loss of the season. Bowe finished that game with seven catches for 98 receiving yards.

He again played a key role in the Tigers' 28-14 win in 2006, catching five passes for 71 yards, including a 19-yard touchdown that put the Tigers up 21-7 in the second quarter.

WR Early Doucet: Like Bowe, Doucet built his legacy with late-game heroics against Alabama.

The 2007 LSU team -- one that would go on to win the BCS championship -- trailed the Tide late in the fourth quarter when Doucet and quarterback Matt Flynn combined to create some of the magic that marked that season. Facing fourth-and-4, Flynn hit Doucet with a 32-yard touchdown pass to tie the score at 34-all with 2:49 remaining.

The Tigers eventually won 41-34, with Doucet catching five passes for 67 yards – including touchdowns of 10 and 32 yards.

Doucet also played a leading role in LSU's win in 2006, catching seven passes for 101 yards and a 30-yard touchdown.

S Chad Jones: Doucet scored the game-tying touchdown in the 2007 win against Alabama, and soon thereafter Jones made the play that led to the Tigers' go-ahead score.

The LSU defensive back tracked down Alabama quarterback John Parker Wilson and sacked him for a 16-yard loss, forcing a fumble that Curtis Taylor recovered at Alabama's 3-yard line with 1:39 to play. Two plays later, Jacob Hester plowed into the end zone for the touchdown that secured the Tigers 41-34 victory, wrapping up their rally from a 27-17 deficit late in the third quarter.

Jones finished that game with four tackles, two sacks, a forced fumble and 18 yards on three punt returns.

TE DeAngelo Peterson: Peterson was at the center of one of the plays that defines the Miles era -- a decade where LSU's coach has certainly proven to be unpredictable.

Alabama led 14-13 in the fourth quarter and LSU faced fourth-and-1 at the Alabama 26. So what did the Tigers do? Run right with Stevan Ridley, who then shocked nearly everyone in the stadium by tossing the ball to Peterson as he streaked left on a reverse.

Peterson's 23-run to the Alabama 3 set up Ridley's go-ahead touchdown run. The Tigers would go on to win 24-21.

Peterson also caught a 12-yard touchdown pass from Jordan Jefferson in the Tigers' 24-15 loss to unbeaten Alabama in 2009.

S Eric Reid: Although Alabama's 21-0 win later that season in the BCS championship rematch spoiled what had been a magical 2011 for LSU, Reid provided one of the plays that kept the Tigers' title chase on track.

With the score tied at 6-all in the fourth quarter, Reid wrestled a Marquis Maze pass away from Alabama tight end Michael Williams at the LSU goal line. His interception helped the Tigers dodge another bullet and send the game to overtime. They would win 9-6 when Alabama's Cade Foster missed a 52-yard field goal in overtime -- his third miss of the night -- and Drew Alleman hit from 25 on the game-winning kick.

Reid finished the night with six tackles, a forced fumble and an interception.

Reid recorded a team-high 11 tackles and broke up a pass in the teams' rematch that season, although the outcome was nowhere near as satisfying for the Tigers. He also notched a team-high seven tackles in Alabama's 21-17 win the following season at Tiger Stadium.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Les Miles said he had never seen a face mask pop off like Leonard Fournette's did last Saturday against Ole Miss, but equipment managers around the SEC have.

LSU director of athletic equipment Greg Stringfellow said his counterparts at Mississippi State and Ole Miss informed him that Fournette was at least the fourth SEC player to have that happen in a game this season.

"I know Ole Miss said it happened one time and Mississippi State said twice," Stringfellow said.

[+] EnlargeLeonard Fournette
Chris Graythen/Getty Images Having his face mask ripped off forced Leonard Fournette from the game for a crucial play.
But that doesn't make it any less of a shock in the moment -- particularly when the key participants had never seen it happen before. To his credit, Fournette tried to keep running on the play, even after Ole Miss linebacker Serderius Bryant grabbed his facemask while falling to the ground and came close to ripping it completely off Fournette's helmet.

"I was just trying to break the tackle," Fournette said. "Next thing I noticed, my facemask was gone. I was looking on the ground for it. I thought it was on the ground, but it actually stuck [to the top of my helmet]."

It was such an egregious personal foul that ESPN color analyst Kirk Herbstreit remarked, "Wow, that may be an NCAA record for a facemask" upon seeing it on instant replay.

Ole Miss' Carlos Thompson tackled the LSU running back shortly after Bryant grabbed the facemask, stopping Fournette for a 6-yard gain. However, the penalty gave LSU a first down at Ole Miss' 3-yard line.

Fournette, who had carried the ball on four of the previous six plays, was unable to continue on the drive, however. Stringfellow and his staff were busy on the Tigers' sideline trying to either fix the original helmet or fit Fournette with a new one as quickly as possible, but quarterback Anthony Jennings hit tight end Logan Stokes with the game-winning touchdown pass two plays later.

"All my guys saw it, so we all kind of ran together at one time," Stringfellow said. "I was the first one there and I just grabbed it and looked at it to see what was broken on it to see if it could be reattached real quickly. We were all kind of like, ‘Holy crap,' but the game was still going on and it was kind of a key part of the game, obviously. We were trying to figure out exactly what was going on, trying to get him back on the field."

What was going on was that a freight train wearing a No. 7 LSU jersey broke away from Bryant, whose right hand held his facemask in a death grip as he fell. Stringfellow said the two forces moving in opposite directions pulled apart three of the four rubberized fixings that held the facemask and helmet together. The fourth was "hanging on by a thread," he said.

Stringfellow didn't think it was a defect with the Riddell helmet that Fournette was wearing, however.

"It looked like it had just had a catastrophic failure because of the amount of force," Stringfellow said. "And facemasks are made, really, to absorb blows that come into them. When you pull the opposite way of the way they're supposed to absorb, different things happen. They're not made to go out from force. They're made to go in with force."

The play has become an amusing sidenote to Saturday's game because LSU still went on to score the go-ahead points on the drive. LSU coach Miles even made light of the situation at his post-practice interview session on Monday.

"I told him today in practice, I said I would've ripped it off much quicker and it would not have slowed him down at all, and then I just told him he needed to be careful where he put his head after he lost his facemask," Miles said. "I never saw anything like it. I never saw a guy handle it like he handled it, either. Just rolled on through it."

Miles would not have found the situation so funny had LSU failed to score on the drive while one of its leading offensive players -- Fournette ran 23 times for 113 yards against the Rebels -- was on the sideline.

That was Stringfellow's beef about the situation afterward. He went so far as to suggest that the SEC establish a rule where a team's equipment staff would receive extra time to fit a player with a new helmet in such a situation, so that the opponent who commits the penalty doesn't gain an advantage through the infraction.

"We probably could have gotten him back in there if we got another first down, but we were so close it didn't happen," Stringfellow said. "But still, missing him that close to the end zone, in that game, we're very fortunate to have a good group of running backs that you could sub somebody in and get the job done.

"But in the same sense, the guy was playing pretty good right then and you don't want to lose him at that point in time. So we did everything that we could to get him back on the field as quick as possible. For the next time that he had to go on the field, he had a brand-new facemask."

Luckily for LSU, the Tigers didn't require Fournette's services any further in the 10-7 win.

LSU freshman tracker: Week 9

October, 26, 2014
10/26/14
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU earned easily its biggest win of the season on Saturday when it rallied past previously unbeaten Ole Miss for a 10-7 victory.

The Tigers once again got major contributions from a host of true freshmen in the contest. Here is a recap of what those freshmen accomplished:

S Jamal Adams

What he did: Adams tied with safety Ronald Martin for the most tackles out of the LSU secondary with five. He also tied cornerback Jalen Collins for the team lead with three pass breakups.

What it means: Adams continues to stand out at safety in the Tigers’ nickel and dime defensive packages and also on special teams. He also attempted another of his famous flops when Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace drove a shoulder into Adams’ chest along the Rebels’ sideline. As when Adams flopped after a nudge from Florida’s Andre Debose two weeks ago, Wallace’s shoulder bump earned him a penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct.

WR Malachi Dupre

What he did: Dupre came off the bench at wideout and played extensively but did not record a catch against Ole Miss.

What it means: This was the second straight game Dupre failed to notch a single reception. He hasn’t had more than one catch in a game since a three-reception outing against New Mexico State Sept. 27. He’s still second on the team with 257 receiving yards, but throwing the ball to Dupre is clearly not LSU’s top priority these days.

RB Leonard Fournette

What he did: Fournette posted his third 100-yard game of the season, rushing 23 times for 113 yards against the Rebels. He also caught two passes for 41 yards and returned two kickoffs for 57 yards. On the negative side, Fournette lost a fumble for the first time this season.

What it means: Fournette started for the third straight game and teamed with Terrence Magee and Kenny Hilliard to give the Tigers a three-pronged rushing attack Saturday. LSU’s offensive line continued its strong play of late, and the backfield trio -- with Fournette in the lead role -- had an outstanding night.

DT Davon Godchaux

What he did: Godchaux started at defensive tackle for the fifth straight game and finished with three tackles and half a tackle for a loss before getting ejected in the fourth quarter after drawing his second unsportsmanlike conduct penalty.

What it means: Godchaux continues to play an important role along the defensive line, but that ejection could have been more costly than it turned out to be. Ole Miss got the ball back for one final possession after he left the playing field and could have won with a touchdown or kicked a field goal to tie the game and force overtime. It didn’t help the Tigers’ cause that one of their starters was watching from the locker room at that point.

WR Trey Quinn

What he did: Quinn started at receiver for the third straight game and finished with two catches for 42 yards. That was his second-best yardage total of the season, trailing only a 46-yard performance against New Mexico State.

What it means: Nobody on the team caught more than two passes Saturday, as LSU quarterback Anthony Jennings completed just eight throws all evening. Jennings looked Quinn’s way several times, but Ole Miss’ secondary is one of the best in the nation and didn’t allow the Tigers to accomplish much through the air.

LSU freshman tracker

October, 19, 2014
10/19/14
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Terrence Magee and the defense were the stars of LSU’s 41-3 win against Kentucky on Saturday, but several of the Tigers’ true freshmen still played key roles in the victory.

Here is a recap of some of their performances:

S Jamal Adams
What he did:
Statistics don’t adequately explain the ways Adams impacts a game, but he had his best statistical performance against Kentucky. He finished with eight tackles, one sack and 1.5 tackles for loss and also starred on special teams – particularly with a bone-crushing block on Tre’Davious White’s 67-yard punt return for a touchdown.

What it means: Adams continues to play a valuable role when the Tigers bring extra defensive backs onto the field and is developing into an exciting playmaker. Coach Les Miles described him as "electric" after the game. He still hasn’t started a game yet, but it seems clear that he’s a future star for the LSU defense.

RB Leonard Fournette
What he did:
Fournette ran nine times for 31 yards and a touchdown in the first quarter alone, but took off most of the second half with the game well in hand and Terrence Magee (9-127, 2 TDs) running the ball effectively. Fournette finished with 15 carries for 40 yards.

What it means: After he ran 27 times last week against Florida, LSU seemed prepared to hand Fournette another heavy workload on Saturday. Once the Tigers easily took command in the second quarter, it became unnecessary to feed Fournette, and the Tigers were able to save their star freshman for next week’s showdown with Ole Miss.

DT Davon Godchaux
What he did:
Godchaux started for the fourth straight game -- and fifth time in six games -- and posted two tackles.

What it means: Another freshman whose stat line isn’t a great indicator of his value, Godchaux continues to progress as an interior lineman. There is a correlation between his improvement and the Tigers’ effectiveness up the middle. Let’s see what happens against Ole Miss, though, before we declare the Tigers’ problems solved.

QB Brandon Harris
What he did:
Harris entered the game with a little more than 10 minutes left in the fourth quarter and LSU up 41-3. On his first drive, Harris floated a pass to John Diarse that Marcus McWilson intercepted in the end zone, and the Tigers ran repeatedly to milk the remaining time on the clock on his second drive. The interception was Harris’ only pass attempt, and he ran once for an 8-yard gain.

What it means: Harris didn’t play last week against Florida and only entered the Kentucky game once it was well in hand. It’s obvious which way LSU offensive coordinator Cam Cameron has been leaning since Harris’ disastrous starting debut against Auburn. Anthony Jennings has not been particularly effective as the starting quarterback, but it’s obviously his job for now.

RB Darrel Williams
What he did:
Williams got most of his playing time in the fourth quarter and ran 10 times for 61 yards as the Tigers worked to run the remaining time off the clock in their blowout win.

What it means: Prior to the fourth quarter, Williams had only one carry for 5 yards. He did a nice job with his garbage-time carries, running nine times in the fourth quarter for 56 yards, but he’s obviously on the lower end of the tailback pecking order.
BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU's punt coverage team surrendered 59 return yards in the entire 2012 season. That total dropped to 47 yards last fall. In fact, LSU's punt team hadn't allowed 100 return yards in a season since 2008.

The Tigers' streak ended last Saturday, however, when Florida's Andre Debose scorched LSU for 115 yards on two punt returns -- one of which went for a 62-yard touchdown.

That begs an obvious question: Was the problem simply that LSU was trying to corral one of the best return men in SEC history -- Debose is tied for third in the conference's career record book with five kick returns for touchdowns -- or was something lacking on the coverage units?

[+] EnlargeFlorida's Andre Debose
Rob Foldy/Getty ImagesAndre Debose has 115 punt-return yards against LSU, including a 62-yard touchdown.
“It was a combination of both,” said LSU cornerback Tre'Davious White, one of the Tigers' punt coverage team members. “He's a great returner, not to take nothing away from him, but watching film there were definitely some things that we did wrong. There were some wrong angles that we took and did some things that we need to clean up.”

As White mentioned, the Tigers' issues were twofold. Punter Jamie Keehn accepted some of the blame for Debose's long returns, saying that he should have kicked the ball higher in order to give his teammates more time to sprint downfield. But White and fellow coverage man Deion Jones admitted that the group should have done a better job of defending the areas they were assigned to cover.

“It was just the little things about our lane integrity, and stuff that we worked, but we didn't really stress, and it wound up showing when we took the field,” Jones said. “We saw this could hurt us, and it almost did.”

The Tigers still managed to win 30-27 despite Debose's two long returns, but those runbacks were a blow to the collective ego of an LSU punt coverage team that hadn't allowed a touchdown since Ole Miss' Marshay Green's 44-yard score in 2007.

“It hurt us. We didn't know what it was at first,” Jones said. “We'd been getting by with it each week and then somebody exposes it and it's like, ‘Oh, this is what it was.' ”

As for Keehn, his numbers are actually up from last season, when he averaged 41.0 yards per punt and the Tigers ranked eighth in the SEC in net punting (punting average minus opponent return average) at 38.1 ypp.

After Debose's long returns inflated opponents' punt return average against LSU from 1.47 yards per return to 4.0, the Tigers are currently the only SEC team to have surrendered at least 100 punt returns yards in 2014 (177 yards on 44 punts). LSU ranks fourth in the league in net punting, however, at 41.1 ypp and Keehn is third in the league with an average of 45.6 ypp.

“We have got a weapon there, we've just got to make sure that our guys recognize their responsibility to cover,” LSU coach Les Miles said.

Keehn said he should have punted the ball higher against Florida, but in his defense, LSU was backed up against its own end zone on both punts that Debose returned. LSU's offense stalled at its own 10-yard line before Keehn launched a 52-yard punt that Debose returned for an early touchdown, and LSU was on its own 11 when Debose later returned a 51-yard Keehn punt to the Tigers' 9.

Those are hardly ideal circumstances when punting to one of the conference's all-time most dangerous return men.

“The direction was good, distance was good. [We needed] a bit more hangtime from me, give my guys a little more of a chance to get down there,” Keehn said. “The hangtime probably didn't match the distance. I probably outkicked the coverage a little bit there, but when I'm backed up in my own end zone, I'm trying to hit the biggest ball I can and trying to flip the field.”

Nonetheless, LSU is typically the team that creates huge momentum swings with explosive returns, not the one that surrenders them. Those lapses caught the Tigers off guard, and were the focus of extra attention when they returned to the practice field on Monday.

Saturday's opponent, Kentucky, isn't nearly as dangerous in the return game -- the Wildcats are 10th in the SEC in punt return average at 8.4 -- but the Tigers know they can't afford to remain sloppy while defending their coverage lanes.

“I feel like going into Saturday, it'll show because we practiced it hard [Monday],” White said. “Debose, he's a great returner, not to take anything away from him, but I feel if we do those things right that we did wrong, it could have probably limited some of those yards that he got.”

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